Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 19th, 2004, 2:31 pm #71

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
Denali National Park & Preserve (AK)
Fatal Fall on Mt. Healy

Bethany Pate, 19, of Cleveland, Tennessee died of injuries sustained during a fall that took place at approximately 11:30 p.m. on Monday, August 16th, during a day hike on Mt. Healy. Pate and one of her two hiking companions were attempting to go below a rock outcropping in steep, rugged terrain near the summit at the 4,500 foot elevation when she stepped on a loose rock and fell approximately 45 feet, landing face-down against some rocks below the outcropping. She was semi-conscious when her hiking partner, Rosemary Korish, 18, of Cashton, Wisconsin reached her location. Korish called for help from Anthony Cluff, 23, from Houston, Texas, who had stayed below to wait for the two to return. Cluff remained with Pate while Korish hiked back about three-and-a-half miles back to the trailhead to seek assistance. Park rangers were notified by a call from the concession bus barn just after midnight. Due to the time of night and rugged terrain, the Rescue Communication Center (RCC) in Anchorage was contacted. RCC dispatched a night-vision equipped Pavehawk helicopter with a crew of technically trained rescue personnel, including paramedics, and HC-130 plane from the 210th Rescue Squadron stationed at the Kulis Air National Guard Base in Anchorage. The HC-130 was sent along to facilitate communications, refuel the helicopter, and provide additional support with parajumpers if needed. The aircraft left Anchorage around 2:45 a.m. The plane arrived first, in about 45 minutes, and its crew was able to see the beam from the Cluff’s flashlight. The helicopter landed near the site at 4:15 a.m., and the paramedics determined that Pate was no longer alive. Cluff was flown out to the park airstrip. During a later interview, he told rangers that Pate had stopped breathing within 30 minutes after Korish had gone for assistance. Rangers flew to the accident location to complete the investigation and remove Pate’s body from the mountain. Pate and her hiking companions were seasonal employees of the McKinley Chalet Resorts. The hike to Mt. Healy is a popular day hike, even though only the first two miles is maintained trail. Above that point, access is via social trail or cross-country travel. This is the first falling fatality to have occurred on Mt. Healy. [Submitted by Kris Fister, Public Affairs Officer]
http://data2.itc.nps.gov/morningreport/ ... F19%2F2004
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 19th, 2004, 2:32 pm #72

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
A HIKER cheated death when his rucksack snagged on a tree just short of a sheer drop.
John Mallaby had already tumbled 500ft down a steep Austrian slope when his fall was broken inches from death.
The 80-year-old was left hanging in the branches of a tree for three hours before his cries for help were heard.
John, a former manager for the chemical giant ICI, said: 'My legs just gave way beneath me, the path I was on was steeper than I thought.
'I rolled down the hill like a hedgehog. I managed to stop myself at one point but realised I'd never make it back up the slope, so slipped further down.
'It was lucky I was caught by the tree as that stopped me going over the edge of the cliff.
'I was stuck there, calling for help, until an Austrian man came and rescued me.
'He pulled me in a bit and tied me to the tree. I was joking that I felt like a dog on a lead.'
http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/tm_ob ... _page.html

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 20th, 2004, 4:09 pm #73

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
A helicopter airlifted an Illinois climber who was injured when a falling rock struck his leg during a guide-led climb in the Tetons.

Anthony J. Chereso, 41, of Schaumburg, Ill., was climbing near the lower end of a fixed rope when he was struck by the rock Tuesday evening, according to a park news release.

Guides provided immediate medical care and helped Chereso to an overnight hut located on the Lower Saddle, which is at 11,600 feet elevation. Park rangers were called at 7:20 p.m., and a helicopter picked up Chereso about 8:10 p.m. and lifted him down the mountain.

Chereso was taken to St. John's Medical Center in Jackson for treatment. No information about Chereso was available from the hospital Wednesday.

It was the 12th search and rescue effort in Grand Teton this year.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/loca ... i-news-hed

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 20th, 2004, 4:10 pm #74

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
After being airlifted off Mount Shasta by helicopter, Katlin Jones of Redding is listed in stable condition at Mercy Medical Center Redding after sustaining injuries while climbing on the mountain.
The Siskiyou County Sheriff's Department reported the 22 year old Jones had fallen on her ice axe and punctured her trachea while climbing above Lake Helen.

A US Forest Service team led by climbing ranger Matt Hill started hiking up to the accident site, and Sheriff's Department Sergeant Dave Nicholson began an air rescue operation. Helicopters from the California Highway Patrol and California Department of Forestry were dispatched to the scene.

Hill's party reached Jones and stabilized her until the CDF helicopter arrived and transported her to Lake Helen. A paramedic crew from the CHP helicopter attended to her injuries.
http://www.mtshastanews.com/articles/20 ... rescue.txt
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 23rd, 2004, 10:48 pm #75

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
A man missing since Friday afternoon was found alive and reportedly well Saturday after spending a chilly night in the Holy Cross Wilderness.

Bob Koets, 47, of Florida, was hiking with a group of 10 when he became separated while descending Mount of the Holy Cross. His party reported him missing around 5:30 p.m. Friday. Eagle County Search and Rescue teams began searching for the man Friday night and resumed their search Saturday with the help of a helicopter.

Koets had only enough equipment with him for a day-long hike and had no camping gear to protect him through the cool, wet weather Friday night.

"I don't know how he did it," said Sheriff's Deputy Tim Comroe. "But that's a good thing."

Koets was found in Reed's Meadow near the 14,000-foot summit.

The on-again, off-again wet weather made radio communication between the rescue teams difficult at times and wind complicated the helicopter's flight.

Comroe said searchers on the ground heard or saw something in Reed's Meadow around 2:15 p.m. and were able to find Koets around 3:30 p.m. His condition could not be immediately confirmed but Comroe said Koets was able to walk.
http://www.vaildaily.com/apps/pbcs.dll/ ... 10007&rs=2
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 23rd, 2004, 10:57 pm #76

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
A National Guard helicopter took an injured climber from Mount Washington Saturday and ferried him to Salem Memorial Hospital, Linn County Sheriff Dave Burright reported.

John Manotti, 42, of Eugene, fell and injured an ankle when he and his wife, Lisa, were at about 7,000 feet on the mountain in east Linn County, the sheriff said.

Mrs. Manotti called the sheriff's office at about 11 a.m., and rescue teams from Jefferson and Linn counties responded, along with the Corvallis Mountain Rescue Unit.


The 1042nd Medical Co. (Air Ambulance) of the Oregon National Guard sent a helicopter. The chopper took Manotti to the Salem hospital, where he was treated.

http://www.gazettetimes.com/articles/20 ... news11.txt
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 24th, 2004, 4:25 am #77

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
Steven Vasel was a passionate mountain climber, and every time he reached the summit he did a "Rocky"-style victory dance.

Vasel, 34, a 1987 graduate of Coon Rapids High School, danced on some of the world's most majestic peaks. He conquered Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania and Mount Alburtis in Russia. And he had his sights on the biggest challenge of all: making it to the top of Mount Everest, a feat achieved by only a few thousand people.

Vasel's dream of reaching the summit of the world's tallest mountain ended Aug. 15. He was making a training climb on Colorado's Mount Wilson and was descending from the 14,246-foot peak when he slipped. He fell 500 to 800 feet down a steep snowfield onto a rock and scree field below, according to the San Miguel County Sheriff's Office.

Steven VaselProvided By Margie OeltjenbrunsVasel's climbing partner, who is a physician, was a few feet ahead of him when she saw him fall. She reached him several minutes later and pronounced him dead at the scene. She hiked down the mountain and reported the accident to authorities, the sheriff said.

Vasel's body was recovered the next day. The San Miguel County medical examiner ruled the cause of death as traumatic head injury.

The accident happened on a mountain that locals describe as treacherous, with sharp loose rocks, steep peaks and snowfields that remain throughout the summer.

Click to see full mapIt was not clear whether Vasel or his partner were using ropes, the sheriff's office said.

Vasel, who lived in suburban Washington, D.C., began mountain hiking after taking a high school field trip to the western United States. His love for mountain climbing never waned, said his mother, Margie Oeltjenbruns.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/462/4942161.html
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 24th, 2004, 4:27 am #78

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
Roberto Cataldo is headed home to Italy, and officials at Denali National Park and Preserve are preparing to reopen a backcountry area near Kantishna where the 29-year-old adventurer reported fighting off a grizzly with an ice ax earlier this month.
A lot of people are still wondering exactly what happened in the Denali backcountry Aug. 2 when Cataldo claimed he drove off a grizzly by burying the point of an ice ax in its back.
Denali wildlife photographer Bill Watkins has posted photographs of an encounter between Cataldo and another bear on his Web site and offered his opinion as a veteran bear watcher on how the encounter could have been avoided.
Watkins also has reported that he met Cataldo the day after the Italian claimed to have made contact with the bear near Kantishna.
"She lightly clawed his left arm, tearing his blue, long-sleeve undershirt, leaving him with superficial scratches,'' Watson wrote. "He turned and hit the bear with his ice axe, burying it into her shoulder. She reared back and roared, and then took off with her cubs with the ice axe still buried into her shoulder.''
That's pretty much the same story Cataldo later told park officials, according to Denali ranger Pat Navaille and bear biologist Pat Owen.
Yet despite overflights and ground patrols of the area where the incident was reported to have taken place, they have found no sign of a bear with an ice ax in its back, or an ax, or even an obviously injured sow with spring cubs, as reported by Cataldo.
"I don't know what happened,'' Navaille said. "I'd be interested in knowing what happened. I think no one really knows other than him and possibly a bear.''
Navaille said Cataldo showed him an ice ax said to be identical to the one stuck in the bear. Cataldo even described how he struck the animal and buried the ax right up to its head.
http://www.adn.com/alaska/story/5460604p-5398381c.html
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 24th, 2004, 4:32 am #79

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 24th, 2004, 5:00 pm #80

Hypothermia and grizzly bears appear to be involved in the death of a hiker on the Bridger-Teton National Forest south of Yellowstone National Park, although investigators are still piecing together clues.

David Anderson, 24, was found lying face down in a marshy area of Bailey Meadows, off the Arizona Creek Trail on Wednesday. Officials estimate that he died Monday night.

"We're still speculating whether or not it was a hypothermia death and a bear contact after death, or did the bear contact come first and was hypothermia even involved," Teton County Sheriff Bob Zimmer said Thursday. "He had puncture marks and appeared to have been mauled by a bear."

Zimmer said there was not a significant amount of blood at the scene, indicating perhaps the bear came upon Anderson after death.
http://www.casperstartribune.net/articl ... 672398.txt
I've never heard of the Secret Service being involved in a search but thanks to Jim G., here's this:

JACKSON, Wyo. (AP) - Following the waffle-cut pattern of a Merrell hiking
boot, searchers retraced the steps of David Anderson, piecing together a
story of how the fit 24-year-old died of hypothermia.

Searchers, including a Secret Service tracker and 22 volunteers, combed
steep, overgrown drainages in the Teton Wilderness in the days after
Anderson's body was recovered Aug. 11.

Though there was no crime to investigate, Teton County Sheriff Bob Zimmer
sent teams back into the field to try to recover Anderson's camping gear and
to understand how he came to die near a trail not far from a highway.

he Richardson, Texas, man was spending his second summer in Grand Teton
National Park as an employee at Signal Mountain Lodge. He and a friend
struck out Sunday evening, Aug. 8, for the Huckleberry Mountain historic
lookout, northeast of the park on the Bridger-Teton National Forest.

The two were intending to meet six other friends at the lookout, Zimmer
said. The men mistakenly hiked past the lookout and descended into Rodent
Creek, where they camped a few miles east of the lookout.

The next morning they began hiking back to the lookout. Anderson's friend
last saw him near a fork in the trail where Rodent Creek Trail connects to
Sheffield Creek Trail, which leads to the lookout.

The friend, who was ahead of Anderson, continued hiking after looking back
to see Anderson heading in the right direction.

On Friday, Secret Service Agent Corby Rowe picked up Anderson's trail at
that point. Rowe followed his boot prints up switchbacks on the trail toward
the lookout. But Anderson's tracks soon disappear from the trail.

After scouting the area for some time, Rowe discovered Anderson had left the
trail and started bushwhacking along a southeastern flank of Huckleberry
Mountain. It took Rowe about an hour and a half to hike from the point where
Anderson was last seen to where he went off the established trail.

The agent had a clear view of the lookout and speculated that the young man
may have tried to take a short-cut.

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