Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 17th, 2004, 2:02 pm #61

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
A mountain climber is dead and another has serious injuries after falling rock knocked them off an ice slope on Mount Athabasca in Jasper National Park.
Four climbers, working two to a rope, were ascending a moderately difficult ice face yesterday near the Columbia Icefields when boulders began tumbling from an overhead band of rock.
"There were some sizeable rocks in the rock fall," said Parks Canada public safety specialist Steve Blake Monday.
Two of the climbers on one rope were hit. One, a 26-year-old man, died after a 45-metre fall.
His female climbing partner sustained serious injuries.
Parks Canada got an early jump responding to the tragedy, said Blake.
"Some of our Parks Canada staff at the Icefields Centre saw through a spotting scope some activity up there that seemed sort of frenzied and out of the ordinary for climbing," he said.
http://vancouver.cbc.ca/regional/servle ... ks20040816
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 17th, 2004, 2:04 pm #62

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
Bryce Canyon National Park (UT)
Lightning Strike Fatality

On Thursday, August 12th, a 58-year-old Dutch national who was hiking the Bristlecone Loop Trail with his wife and another couple was struck by lightning near Yovimpa Point (elevation 9,000 feet). The incident was reported by visitors to a Bryce Canyon shuttle bus driver who immediately called the park via radio. Five rangers responded, but the man was pronounced dead at the scene. The body recovery and investigation were conducted jointly by the park and Garfield County Sheriff’s Department. The last time a visitor was struck by lightning at Bryce Canyon was in September, 2002. The woman recovered after spending over a week in intensive care. It marked the fifth time that a visitor has been struck by lightning in the park in the last 20 years. [Submitted by Colleen Bathe, Public Information Officer]
http://data2.itc.nps.gov/morningreport/ ... F17%2F2004
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 17th, 2004, 2:05 pm #63

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
Death Valley National Park was closed Monday after flooding that officials said killed at least two people and cut off power and water.
An intense thunderstorm hit the Mojave Desert on Sunday evening, causing flash flooding and closing roads in the sprawling park.
"We're trying to account for all the visitors who were here," park Superintendent J.T. Reynolds told The Associated Press on Monday, using one of two telephone lines still operating from the park office.
The bodies remained Monday in a vehicle stuck in mud, rock and debris at Furnace Creek Wash, Reynolds and park spokeswoman Roxanne Dey said.
"We haven't been able to remove them yet," Dey said.
California Highway Patrol and National Park Service helicopters spotted at least eight other vehicles off highways and dirt roads, but officials said they could not immediately tell if they were occupied.
Reynolds said water and wastewater lines were severed, and the park would be closed at least two days and possibly through the weekend. The last time the park closed that long was in 1985, he said.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercuryn ... 417496.htm
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 17th, 2004, 7:06 pm #64

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
A plane crash during the filming of a movie over the Dry Tortugas has taken the life of cinematographer Neal Fredericks, The Miami Herald reported Tuesday.

Fredericks was best known as the cinematographer of the Blair Witch Project, a low-budget but successful horror film.

Fredericks, 35, of Los Angeles, was aboard a single-engine Cessna that crashed about 79 miles west of Key West Saturday.

The Coast Guard said the pilot and three other members of the camera crew were rescued.

U.S. Army divers recovered Fredericks' body from the plane Sunday.

http://www.wtev.com/entertainment/story ... 222023DA31
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Joined: August 18th, 2004, 2:22 am

August 18th, 2004, 2:25 am #65

For nearly four decades, Mike Hines helped to spread the word of God. As a missionary in Central America, Hines would fly above villages in a specially modified plane with large speakers, broadcasting to the people below.

Over the years, his following included thousands of converts in El Salvador and Honduras. He once asked that those who believed, signal him back with a mirror reflecting the sun toward his airplane, and his mission soon was carried out above sparkling horizons.

But Hines' airplane disappeared off the radar screen nine days ago, near the Honduran border with El Salvador. That's when Brunswick's Brian Garrett got an email.


"The plane went down at the side of the highest mountain in Honduras, called Celanqua which is about a 10,000 foot mountain."

Garrett and Burleson are part of an organization called the International Supply Operations Network, or ISON. The group's goal is to respond to tragedies first to help direct other relief agencies to the best course of action.

In the past, ISON has provided disaster relief in the Abacos following hurricane Mitch and in south Florida after hurricanes Andrew.

But now, it was time to go after a lost man of the cloth.

"The monies were not available," said Reverend Garry Wiggins of the Evangel Temple Assembly of God. "We didn't have the almost $5000 in hand to do this."

But Wiggins and Garrett, the founders of ISON were determined to go. They paid with a personal credit card, and within hours, Garrett and Dr. Burleson were on their way to Central America.

Getting to the wreck meant cutting through miles of thick jungle where danger is everywhere, from animals, poisonous plants, insects, and the terrain itself.

"The area we were maneuvering in, there are mountains and cliffs and you're walking on small ledges with significant drops below you," said Garrett.

But the team's training paid off on the fourth day. They had traversed several mountains and miles of virgin jungle when the first pieces of the plane's wreckage was discovered.

"The stabilizer was found first, then each of the wings. About a kilometer from where the first piece was we found the fuselage."

Garrett and the others had hoped Hines might be alive, but it was clear the impact had taken the life of this man who'd dedicated three decades to spreading the word of God.

A US military helicopter was radioed in to help carry the missionaries remains out of the jungle. He was buried on Friday.

For the surviving family of Mike Hines, the recovery provided closure. A special celebration of his life and ministry was held Saturday in his home of Honduras.

Garrett is grateful for his group's safe passage.

"We certainly think that God was with us, and involved and we're thankful for that."

b
Hey how ya doing, i was just wondering who, and how they got this story, and do they think its right
No disrespect, but PLEASE RESPOND,
THANK YOU
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 18th, 2004, 2:12 pm #66

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
In a separate incident in Banff National Park, a 19-year-old Parks Canada worker died early Sunday morning after falling from the pathway of a popular hiking trail.
The teenager was one of three hikers who set out from their campground about midnight for a short walk in Johnston Canyon toward a series of waterfalls. The teen was familiar with the pathways, but it was dark and the hikers weren't carrying lights, said Brad White, a public-safety specialist with Parks Canada.
"She likely climbed over the railing and consequently slipped and fell into the canyon," Mr. White said.
Officials found the teen's body in a stream near the pathway where she was reported missing. She fell about 10 metres.
The RCMP said alcohol was a factor in the accident.
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ ... nal/Canada
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 18th, 2004, 2:14 pm #67

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
Here's an excellent LA Times article on the hazards of hiking without water:
-------


Here, he says, is the spot where they found Margaret Bradley, a 24-year-old University of Chicago medical student and marathoner.

Just three months before, the 115-pound Bradley had finished the Boston Marathon in a few ticks over three hours, a solid performance in temperatures well over 80.

"I focused on keeping myself hydrated," she told the magazine Chicago Athlete afterward, "and not letting the adrenaline from the crowd make me do something stupid."

But last month, when she and a companion decided to try a 27-mile trail run in a single day, that caution was missing. A cascading series of miscalculations, say rangers, turned this scholar-athlete into the Grand Canyon's first dehydration fatality in four years.


In a single hour, a hiker in desert heat can easily lose a liter of moisture through sweat — maybe, some experts say, as many as three liters (a liter is slightly more than a quart).

Without water, write authors Michael P. Ghiglieri and Thomas M. Myers in their book "Over the Edge: Death in Grand Canyon," dehydration, hyperthermia and exertion in the canyon can "turn people, inch by inch, into heat zombies…. Kids and young adults seem to run at full function in the heat, sweating appropriately and seemingly going strong, but abruptly, when dehydration kicks in, they crash quickly and often unexpectedly. And die."

At least part of the tale, however, can be gleaned from rangers who were there. By Park Service accounts, the runners began their day about 9 a.m. at Grandview Point, the highest spot along the canyon's South Rim, where the trail head is 7,400 feet above sea level, nearly 5,000 feet above the river.

Here is where the two runners made their first mistakes. They set off nearly four hours after sunrise, several hours later than rangers advise distance hikers to begin on summer days, and they were traveling dangerously light. Bradley's companion had four liters of water. She carried fruit, three protein bars and just two bottles of water (about 1.5 liters). They carried no maps, and Bradley apparently had no flashlight or headlamp.

From Grandview Point, the two headed down an unmaintained, waterless path built by a prospector about 100 years ago, descending 2,600 vertical feet in just three miles. From there they planned to descend farther, then follow the Tonto Trail across the notoriously hot and shadeless Tonto Plateau, about 1,000 feet above the river. Then they'd climb back out on the busier South Kaibab Trail, which tops off at 7,000 feet.

It's unclear why they thought they could do this route in a day, or where they expected to get water. "Not recommended during summer," says the Park Service's free trail guide. "No water."

"This would be a two- or three-day backpack trip with a lot of planning," says Yeston, who served as incident commander. "And the optimum time to do it would be fall," adds Ken Phillips, the park's search and rescue coordinator.


In the first seven months of this year, park personnel have carried nearly 200 hikers out of the canyon by helicopter, most of them suffering from "environmental causes" — exhaustion, dehydration, sometimes water intoxication, which happens when hikers drink plenty but fail to take in salt to help keep their electrolytes balanced.

By 3 p.m. they were in trouble. Bradley's companion couldn't run anymore. He stopped, overheated and exhausted, and curled up in the shade of a bush to rest. In six hours they'd covered about 12 miles, with 15 still to go. Now the temperature was over 100, and their water was gone.

As a hiker heats up, says Yeston, "the body is going to start to divert blood to the parts of the brain that are more basic. The parts of the brain that you might have used to make nuanced decisions about your situation — they're compromised. Long before a person seems drunk or delirious, they're already going to have a subtle loss of fine motor coordination and critical thinking … and even difficulty referencing past experiences."

http://www.latimes.com/features/outdoor ... ug17.story
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 18th, 2004, 2:15 pm #68

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
An 8-year-old dog was back with his owner Tuesday following a mountain rescue by Summit County animal control.
The dog, a golden retriever-chow mix, had been stuck on 12,777-foot Mount Buffalo since Aug. 9, when it followed its owner to the top, according to the Summit Daily News.
The dog's owner, who wasn't identified, said the animal refused to come down and he tried, but failed, to get the dog down on his own. The owner contacted the Summit Rescue Group, which said it wasn't prepared to rescue animals.

Animal control officer Scott Wanke climbed the mountain and found the dog, taking six hours to bring it down safely with ropes and slings
An examination revealed the dog had blistered and cut paws from the sharp rocks on the peak.
"Every summer we have this happen, and sometimes it's not visitors, but people who live here. People shouldn't take their dogs up there," Lesley Craig, the lead animal control officer for Summit County, told the Daily News.
http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/36 ... etail.html
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 18th, 2004, 2:19 pm #69

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
A camper who had been lost in rugged terrain near Dorst Campground in Sequoia National Park for three days has been found.
Bob Gnewuch, 39, did not return to camp Aug. 14 during a church camping trip with his wife and five children.
He had gone in search of his wife after she did not return from her morning jog. His wife returned on her own with minor injuries a few hours later.
Efforts to locate Gnewuch included more than 60 people, two search-dog teams, staff from Yosemite National Park and helicoptors, including one from California Highway Patrol using infrared heat sensing equipment.
Gnewuch left clues for searchers, such as his name written in soft sand with footprints matching the description of the shoes he was wearing, and the words "Bob slept here" written in the sand. At 5:40 p.m. Monday a search team called with information that Gnewuch was found.
http://www.tulareadvanceregister.com/ne ... 65652.html
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 18th, 2004, 2:20 pm #70

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
Sitting by his backyard pool Monday afternoon, Ed Hahn, 50, gazed peacefully at the Santa Ana mountains behind his home as he spoke of his son, who was killed while hiking with friends on the Santa Rosa Plateau.

"God took him ---- why, I don't know," Hahn said. "It was time for Andy to go."
The 17-year-old boy died Sunday after he jumped onto a huge boulder that broke loose, throwing him to the ground. The boulder, which police officials have described as being 10 to 12 feet in diameter, then rolled downhill, crushing the boy and killing him at the scene, Murrieta police officials said Monday.
Night was falling as Andy Hahn, his older brother, James, and two friends were hiking in a mountainous area near Copper Canyon Trail about a mile from the Hahns' residence. With daylight fading, the group decided to head home.

When Andy jumped on the boulder and it gave way, James and the friends were able to scramble to safety, said Murrieta Fire Department Battalion Chief Mike Jennings, adding that he believes the boy died instantly.

The accident occurred about a mile from any road in a steep, narrow canyon, full of huge rocks and boulders. he said.

"Hiking up there, you are pushing the envelope," he said.
http://www.nctimes.com/articles/2004/08 ... _28_22.txt
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