Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 11th, 2004, 1:25 pm #51

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
Rocky Mountain National Park (CO)
Rescue of Injured Hiker

Richard Mercado, 40, of Huston, Texas, sustained serious head injuries in a fall on Andrew’s Glacier on Monday, August 2nd. Mercado was reportedly sliding down the glacier on a plastic trash bag when he spun out of control and hit some rocks along the edge of the ice. Park dispatch received a cell phone call reporting the accident. A park entrance station employee happened upon the scene and provided additional information via radio. Rangers began a hasty response up the trail while simultaneously arranging for a rental helicopter from Geo-Seis out of Fort Collins. SAR personnel and equipment were flown to a landing zone near the base of the glacier. They joined the rangers who came up the trail in providing advanced life support. Mercado was flown from the glacier to a hospital by a St. Anthony’s Flight for Life helicopter from Denver.
[Submitted by Mark Magnuson, Chief Ranger]
http://data2.itc.nps.gov/morningreport/ ... F11%2F2004
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 11th, 2004, 2:22 pm #52

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
The body of a Los Gatos man who fell about 75 feet to his death while climbing Mount Ritter in eastern Madera County was recovered late Monday, a spokeswoman for the Madera County Sheriff's Department reported.
Dead is Otto Loenneker, 59, who was reported missing Sunday after he failed to return to his camp at the base of the mountain.
The spokeswoman, Erica Stuart, said Loenneker had been climbing with a friend when the two men reportedly set off in different directions early Sunday to scout for possible routes for a later attempt to the summit.
Loenneker is believed to have hit an ice field, causing him to fall to his death.
A helicopter pilot spotted the body Monday shortly after 5:30 p.m. and a team of search and rescue volunteers organized by Mono County authorities was dropped into the area to recover the body.
http://www.fresnobee.com/updates/metro/ ... 7857c.html

Another story:
http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/archiv ... 2local.htm
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 11th, 2004, 2:23 pm #53

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
Sandia researcher Bill Scherzinger, president of the Albuquerque Mountain Rescue Council, looks at a SAR map and a standard topographic map used in search and rescue missions. (Photo by Randy Montoya / Courtesy Sandia National Laboratories)


Rapid Terrain Visualization (RTV) precision-mapping synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data was used for the first time last November by the Albuquerque Mountain Rescue Council (AMRC) to help find and rescue a hiker stranded in the dark in the Sandia Mountains in New Mexico.

SAR experts at Sandia say the same technology could map other mountainous terrain around the country and be used in search and rescue missions there.

The Sandia Mountain effort started with a conversation between Dale Dubbert of Sandia's SAR Sensor Technologies Department, a former rescue council volunteer, and Sandia researcher Steve Attaway, a long-time group member.

"We talked about Sandia's capabilities to do precision terrain maps and realized that this technology could be useful in search and rescue missions," Dubbert says. "It had the potential of providing detailed information about terrain where searches are underway, including heights, locations of crevices and cliffs, and even different types of vegetation."

The RTV mapping system uses interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR). Two antennae offset in elevation aboard a moving aircraft allow the measurement of target height, as well as east-west and north-south position like conventional SAR. This produces a 3-D map that shows terrain details.

The IFSAR maps have an absolute height accuracy of less than two meters and a relative accuracy of less than one meter.

THIS SAR image shows the west face of the Sandia Mountains. Members of the Albuquerque Mountain Rescue Council used detailed versions of it to rescue a man last November. Download 300dpi JPEG image, 'northlaluz-chimney.jpg', 812K (Media are welcome to download/publish this image with related news stories.)

"This is an order of magnitude precision improvement over the standard USGS topographical maps generally used in search and rescue missions," Dubbert says.

No other mapping system in the world achieves this level of accuracy combined with a high area coverage rate and real-time processing, says Dubbert. The IFSAR can map day or night and through cloud cover.

It was Dubbert who provided the AMRC map data of the Sandia Mountains, obtained while the RTV SAR was installed on a deHavilland DHC-7 Army aircraft. He gave the council a CD of the maps last year.

A few months later, on a chilly November evening, the search and rescue group used the precision maps for the first time.

Attaway says he got a call just before sundown telling him that a hiker was lost in the Sandia Mountains, and his help was needed for a rescue.

After collecting additional information on the hiker's location, he took a few minutes to create detailed RTV SAR maps. He zoomed in on the area where the man was believed to be and printed out color maps of the location.

Attaway then went to the Sandia tram (aerial lift that takes people from the base of the Sandia Mountains to the peak), located on the west side of the mountains where the rescuers were gathering, and took the tram up to the peak.

"The hiker was climbing the mountain using the tram cables as a guide for off-trail hiking," Attaway says. "He apparently became lost while attempting to follow the tram towers and used his cell phone to call for help. We spotted him from the tram as he waved his flashlight so we would notice him. But seeing him and getting to him were two different things."

The terrain in the area where the hiker was lost is extremely rugged. Members of the rescue group are experts in using compasses, GPS, and topographic maps, but even for them the terrain was difficult to navigate.

AMRC President Bill Scherzinger, another Sandia employee who also participated in the rescue mission, says that's when the crew turned to the RTV SAR maps for help.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20 ... 080614.htm
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 11th, 2004, 2:24 pm #54

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
A climber became trapped at the Minnehaha climbing rocks on Tuesday and as rescue crews tried to get to her, they wound up having to rescue one of their own.
Rescuers say Lacy Davis was apparently climbing without gear and got stuck half way up a cliff. She yelled to people walking by and told them she was hurt.
Because of the rough and steep terrain, what's called a "technical rescue crew" went in after her.
Just before crews were ready to lower Davis from the cliff, one of the rescue workers collapsed on a nearby ledge. So a second team to come in and complete what turned into a double rescue mission.
The rescuer had heat stroke and is doing okay. Doctors say the climber is in satisfactory condition.
http://www.kxly.com/common/getStory.asp?id=38619
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 12th, 2004, 3:02 pm #55

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
The Star reports that Barry Clements, 57, died of a heart attack while climbing Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania last week. Barry collapsed four hours into the summit push.

"One of the highlights of his life was an attempt on Mount Everest in 2002, although fatigue prevented him from reaching the summit. He also ran the Comrades 10 times and was a five-time Dusi canoe marathon veteran."

Barry Clements was the founder of the Game chain stores.
http://www.mounteverest.net/story/Evere ... 2004.shtml
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 14th, 2004, 12:51 am #56

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
A woman hiking in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was bitten by a rabid bat, Park Service officials said today.
The 56-year-old woman, who is from Iowa, was hiking on the Old Sugarlands Nature Trail with a group of about a dozen when she was bitten on Wednesday. She is the only person known to have been bitten by any rabid animal in the 70-year history of the park.

According to a Park Ranger's report, the bat was flying around the woman's head, landed on her fanny pack and came into contact with her elbow, on which she received a small puncture wound.
Other members of the group caught and killed the bat and brought its carcass to Sugarlands Visitor Center.
The woman sought medical treatment and began receiving anti-rabies injections immediately, before rabies tests on the bat were completed at the Sevier County Health Department.
For several years, the park has conducted tests on bats that died or were acting strangely in high human use areas, "but this is only the third one to come back positive," said Park Wildlife Biologist Kim Delozier. "In the other two cases, there was no human contact with the infected animals."
http://www.knoxnews.com/kns/gs_news/art ... 61,00.html
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 14th, 2004, 12:52 am #57

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
Frisco man walked into the forest with two broken arms - and returned to town with two broken arms and a possible broken knee.

According to Mike Schmitt of the Summit Rescue Group, the man and his friend were hiking up Mount Royal Tuesday afternoon when the man apparently fell on the trail and injured his knee. He had broken both arms the previous week; one was in a cast and the other was waiting to be stabilized before going into surgery.

The man, who moved to Frisco about five weeks ago, was hiking near Masonville, a historic mining site on the east side of Mount Royal, when he fell. The man's friend was incapable of helping him down the steep, rocky trail.

It is possible alcohol was involved in the incident, Schmitt said.

Also exacerbating the rescue operation was that rescue teams couldn't locate the injured man.

"They apparently passed him," Schmitt said. "They were supposed to be looking for someone on the trail. They weren't calling out for him because they expected to see him. But the second team ran into him on the trail."

Search team members splinted the man's leg, placed him on a wheeled litter and took him to the bottom of the mountain where paramedics took him to Summit Medical Center for further evaluation.

http://www.summitdaily.com/apps/pbcs.dl ... 10017&rs=2
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 14th, 2004, 1:01 am #58

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
Hypothermia and grizzly bears appear to be involved in the death of a hiker on the Bridger-Teton National Forest south of Yellowstone National Park, although investigators are still piecing together clues.

David Anderson, 24, was found lying face down in a marshy area of Bailey Meadows, off the Arizona Creek Trail on Wednesday. Officials estimate that he died Monday night.

"We're still speculating whether or not it was a hypothermia death and a bear contact after death, or did the bear contact come first and was hypothermia even involved," Teton County Sheriff Bob Zimmer said Thursday. "He had puncture marks and appeared to have been mauled by a bear."

Zimmer said there was not a significant amount of blood at the scene, indicating perhaps the bear came upon Anderson after death.
http://www.casperstartribune.net/articl ... 672398.txt
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 14th, 2004, 1:10 am #59

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
Sequoia & Kings Canyon National Parks (CA)
Three Rescued From Mt. Whitney



On July 31st, the park received word that a 50-year-old woman was experiencing chest pain and shortness of breath at about 13,500 feet near Mt. Whitney. Park medic Dave Walton and helicopter crew manager Carrie Vernon flew to the site in the parks’ helicopter, piloted by Larry Bartel. While Walton was treating the woman, four other visitors approached Vernon, complaining of a variety of altitude-related ailments. With little daylight flight time remaining, a quick assessment was made and the woman and two additional patients were loaded into the helicopter and flown to a medical facility. Typically 200 people climb the 14,496-foot Mt. Whitney each day – not uncommonly in some state of unpreparedness. Although the summit is located in Sequoia NP, most people reach it via a Forest Service trail.
[Submitted by Pat Grediagin, District Ranger, Sequoia District]
http://data2.itc.nps.gov/morningreport/ ... F13%2F2004
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 14th, 2004, 1:12 am #60

We are posting August 2004 accidents/rescues here.
Grand Teton National Park (WY)
Three Rescues in One Day

Rangers dealt with three SAR operations over the course of Monday, August 9th:
· John Waldner, 50, of Southampton, Pennsylvania, was evacuated by helicopter from Fox Creek pass around noon after sustaining injuries to his ankle and knee in a fall. Waldner was hiking the Teton Crest trail with his wife and four companions on Sunday, August 8th, when he lost his footing on some loose rocks, twisting his ankle and knee. The group setup camp near the point where the accident took place. A physician who was hiking in the area examined Waldner’s injuries, then continued hiking until she encountered a backcountry ranger and reported the accident. The ranger found the party, assessed Waldner’s injuries, then called interagency dispatch to report the accident. Due his injuries, the lack of horses for evacuation and the party’s distance from the trailhead, rangers decided to use the park’s contract helicopter. Waldner and his wife were flown to Lupine Meadows and then proceeded on to St. John’s Medical Center.
· John Littel, 49, of Seattle, Washington, was hiking by himself, carrying a heavy pack filled with photography equipment, when he caught his leg between two boulders near the shore of Surprise Lake and injured his lower leg. A passing hiker used a cell phone to call interagency dispatch at 4:30 p.m. A helicopter flew two rangers to an LZ near Amphitheater Lake; the rangers hiked from there to Littel’s location and provided him with medical care. Four more rangers were flown to the landing zone with a rescue litter. The six rangers then carried him back, flew him to Lupine Meadows, and transported him to St. John’s Medical Center.
· Ayako Miller, 32, of Greenville, South Carolina, sprained her knee when she slipped on a boulder during an ascent to Lower Saddle with Exum Mountain Guides on August 8th. She was able to ascend to Lower Saddle with assistance, but could not climb the Grand Teton with the rest of her group. The group descended on Monday afternoon. Guides placed a cell phone call from just above Garnet Canyon Meadows at 4:30 p.m., asking for help from rangers. An off-duty ranger who had been climbing in the area helped transport Miller through the boulder field above the Platforms to a point where a park wrangler with a horse could meet them. The evacuation concluded around 9:30 p.m.
[Submitted by Public Affairs]
http://data2.itc.nps.gov/morningreport/ ... F13%2F2004
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