Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 4th, 2004, 3:23 am #101

I'll post September reports here.
It was a hike to remember earlier this week for a couple from Seattle who were honeymooning in Vermont.

The 38-year-old woman, whose name has not been released, fell and apparently broke her leg while descending from Hunger Mountain.
http://www.wcax.com/Global/story.asp?S=2255019
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 4th, 2004, 4:50 am #102

One elderly man who is legally blind and hikes alone has prompted search-and-rescue efforts in three national parks. Last month in California's Lassen Volcanic National Park, he was lost overnight and, the next day, a search team found him with injuries he suffered when he left the trail and fell down steep slides. He also was dehydrated from packing just a single bottle of water for his hike, records showed.
"He refuses to ... admit difficulty in locating the trail due to poor eyesight" despite the three incidents, a park report said.
http://www.knoxstudio.com/shns/story.cf ... -04&cat=AN
http://data2.itc.nps.gov/morningreport/ ... F03%2F2004
Lassen Volcanic National Park (CA)
Rescue of Missing Hiker

On July 19th, rangers received a report that an elderly man was overdue from
a hike in the southwest area of the park. A hasty search was begun at
daylight the next day. Rangers Luke Hodgson and Allison O’Connor located
Charles Parrish, injured and dehydrated, in a ravine south of Mill Creek
Falls that afternoon. Parrish lost the trail near dusk the previous evening.
At about the same time, he suffered from numerous sliding falls which
deposited him downstream from the falls. Hodgson and O’Connor provided
medical treatment and assisted Parrish to the trailhead. Parrish is legally
blind and had only a bottle of water and the park brochure with him. Parrish
frequents National Park Service areas, has been the subject of searches in
Yosemite and Kings Canyon National Parks, and refuses to carry the ten
essentials or admit difficulty in locating the trail due to poor eyesight.
[Submitted by John Roth, Chief Ranger]
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 8th, 2004, 2:43 pm #103

I'll post September reports here.
No stove, no tent and no hope -- that's the state rescuers found a Calgary man in when they plucked him from an icefield in Banff National Park. Spending a harrowing week lost deep in the remote wilds could have meant death for the man -- if not for a group of committed rescuers who found George Knowles, cold, exhausted and suffering from mild hypothermia, but otherwise uninjured on the edge of the Bonnet Icefield, about 18 km east of Lake Louise, around 9:15 a.m. yesterday.
"He said that he had given up, actually ... he'd lost hope that he was going to survive," said lead rescuer Marc Ledwidge.
The experienced 47-year-old backcountry hiker and his three dogs set out Aug. 21 on a 12-day, 150-km loop near Lake Louise.
"He hadn't had a stove for over a week, so he hadn't had anything hot to eat or drink for over a week," Ledwidge said, adding the hiker had to ration food that he had left, including dried fruit.
When he didn't finish his trip Wednesday as expected, and one of his dogs showed up, park wardens began searching. The second of three dogs appeared at the same cabin Friday.
By Saturday, there were 15 wardens, two park search dogs, one RCMP search dog and a rescue helicopter searching an 850-km area looking for Knowles and the remaining dog.
Thanks to clearing weather yesterday morning, rescuers spotted Knowles from the helicopter, waving to them -- his Burmese mountain dog at his side -- from the edge of the icefield. He was treated in hospital for mild hypothermia and frostbite.
http://www.canoe.ca/NewsStand/CalgarySu ... 17501.html
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 8th, 2004, 2:44 pm #104

I'll post September reports here.
Authorities identified the 26-year-old man found at the summit of Longs Peak on Sunday as Fort Collins resident Sudheer Averineni.
Averineni's body was found about 1 p.m. after his two hiking partners alerted Rocky Mountain National Park staff that he had not reconnected with them Saturday evening, according to a park news release.
Winter weather conditions including high winds, below-freezing temperatures, snow and ice were present at Longs Peak on Saturday and Sunday.
Averineni was wearing tennis shoes, jeans and a hooded sweat shirt, according to the news release.
Weather conditions hampered rescue attempts late Saturday, Patterson said.

This is the first death on Longs Peak this year. There were three fatalities in 2000

http://rockymountainnews.com/drmn/state ... 48,00.html
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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 3:15 pm

September 9th, 2004, 12:34 am #105

I'll post September reports here.
Hiker Who'd Often Climb Barefoot Dies In Freak Accident
Jiri "Jura" Brazdil Fell When Rock Gave Way

POSTED: 6:51 am MDT September 8, 2004

VAIL, Colo. -- An avid hiker who fell 150 feet down a cliff died in what his wife called a freak accident.

Twenty-nine-year-old Czech native Jiri "Jura" Brazdil was so comfortable in the mountains, he would often climb barefoot, friends said.

http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/37 ... etail.html
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 9th, 2004, 1:26 am #106

I'll post September reports here.
Nobody knows for sure what Frank Olding's final moments were like. But friends were not surprised to learn that he likely died trying to ensure the safety of others.
An experienced climber, Seattle attorney and former Army Ranger, Olding fell to his death Monday while climbing Disappointment Peak in Wyoming's soaring Grand Tetons.
Olding, 40, had been leading a climb up the technically demanding East Ridge of 11,618-foot Disappointment Peak. He was about 400 feet from the summit when he apparently decided the final ascent was too risky for two less experienced climbing partners, said Jackie Skaggs, spokeswoman for Grand Teton National Park.
Olding, a consummate climbing teacher according to friends, had probed above the fourth of six "pitches," or segments, of the climb. Intending to find an alternate route, he began rappelling down the mountain's granite face, when his anchor failed. He fell about 50 feet to his death, Skaggs said.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/189 ... bit08.html
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 11th, 2004, 8:42 pm #107

I'll post September reports here.
57-year-old Michigan man fell to his death during a hike at the Grand Canyon.
Gordon R. Wagner Jr. slipped during a Sunday afternoon hike and fell 35 feet to his death. Other hikers with him tried to revive Wagner, but he died shortly after the fall.
Wagner was traveling with a group on an 18-day trip that began the day before he fell at Lees Ferry.
http://kvoa.com/Global/story.asp?S=2280754
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 19th, 2004, 1:28 am #108

I'll post September reports here.

A group of local Boy Scouts and their leaders played key parts in rescuing an 80-year-old Florida woman who got caught in a thunderstorm on her way down Maine's highest mountain in July.

The woman, Loretta Copeland, had been hiking the Appalachian Trail in sections for 12 years. She was less than 2 miles from the end when she ran into trouble on Mount Katahdin, the highest in Maine.
She and two women in their 60s, who were hiking with her, spent more than 24 straight hours hiking up, then part-way down the mountain, most of it during a thunderstorm.
At that point, dehydrated and bleeding, Copeland ran out of strength to continue.
"It was raining and storming, and it was just really bad," Copeland said in a telephone interview this week from her home in Ocala, Fla. "I kept falling, and my legs just gave out on me."
She and her friends had begun hiking at 6 a.m. July 18. They reached the summit at 4 p.m., then started down the mountain.
"I never dreamed it would take so long, and I never stopped for 24 hours," she said. "But I was so tired and going slow."
At about 7 a.m. July 19, when the three elderly women hadn't returned to the base, Baxter State Park rangers launched a rescue operation.
Pressed into service
Five boys and two leaders of Ellington Boy Scout Troop 96 - along with two guides from the High Adventure Boy Scout Camp in Millinocket, Maine - were planning to hike to the peak that day. They were pressed into service as the main rescue team.
A helicopter rescue was ruled out because of bad weather and fog.
"We were pretty shocked when the rangers asked us to take part in the rescue," says scout Andrew Slicer, 14. "But we were like, hey, we're Boy Scouts, let's go."
For their efforts, the scouts gained more than a merit badge. In an upcoming ceremony, the local Volunteer Fire Department will present the five Boy Scouts and their leaders with awards for meritorious service, Fire Chief Michael Varney says. It is only the second time the department has given such an award in 20 years.
The five scouts to be honored are Eric Dinse, Keith Durao, Dan Hodgdon, Slicer, and Mike Stauffer. The leaders are Ted Kenyon and Tom Stauffer.
The rescue began in earnest after a hiker coming down the trail confirmed that Copeland needed help. Rangers called for an ambulance, and the Scouts headed up the trail, which Ranger Rodney Angotti describes as "long, steep, and grueling."
"She was pretty banged up and couldn't walk on her own," Kenyon said of Copeland. "But she was in good spirits, and she was an experienced hiker."
The Scout group carried Copeland to a relatively flat area of the trail and applied first aid to cuts on her legs, caused by multiple falls. They also gave her food and dry clothes.
Major players
Rangers then brought up a "basket stretcher," in which the patient is surrounded by a metal frame, and Copeland was strapped in.
"The Scouts were very enthusiastic to help," Tom Stauffer said. "They weren't kids pushed off to the side. They were a major part of the rescue."
The nine-person Scout group and five other people, including rangers and hikers, began carrying Copeland down to the base in the stretcher. The effort to descend the 5,300-foot mountain was complicated by the difficulty of the terrain and bad weather. It ended up taking seven hours.
"There were some points where it was really narrow and steep," Mike Stauffer said. "It was raining, so everything was slippery, and the trail was pretty rough."
During the rescue, rangers recruited more than 20 additional hikers to help in the effort. Seven-person teams took turns carrying Copeland's stretcher as far as they could before handing off to another team.
At times the trail turned into steps cut into nearly vertical granite, and the stretcher had to be passed hand-over-hand along a line of rescuers.
Hospitalized only briefly
When they finally got Copeland to the bottom, she was taken to a local hospital, treated overnight, and released.
The rescuers helped her two friends down the mountain, but they didn't need to be carried.
In a typical year 35 to 40 rescue operations are conducted in the park, Angotti said, adding that 39 people have died on the mountain since 1950. Only two weeks before Copeland was rescued, an 83-year-old man was carried off the mountain, and another hiker was crushed to death by a falling rock, the ranger said.
The park rangers were impressed with the Boy Scouts' efforts. They took them out to a celebratory dinner and wrote them a congratulatory letter.
Hodgdon said the experience gave him a new respect for older hikers - and an awareness of the importance of being prepared to deal with emergencies.
"It really changed a lot about me, and it gave me a lot more respect for older people," he said.

More:
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?news ... 1556&rfi=6
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 19th, 2004, 1:30 am #109

I'll post September reports here.
The New Jersey woman who was injured in a fall while hiking on Cadillac Mountain earlier this week has died. Bette Powell, 60, of Haddenfield, N.J., died Thursday at Eastern Maine Medical Center in Bangor, said Kevin Cochary, a park official.
Powell and her husband, Dennis Powell, were visiting the park as part of their 40th anniversary celebration and were hiking on the South Ridge Trail when the accident occurred early Wednesday afternoon.
According to Cochary, Powell was coming down a 10-foot boulder using iron rungs when she lost her balance and fell backward, striking her head on a rock
http://www.bangornews.com/editorialnews ... ?ID=435683
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 19th, 2004, 1:34 am #110

I'll post September reports here.
A 76-year-old man fell on Mount Watatic injuring his shoulder and he was LifeFlighted to UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester.
Ashburnham and Ashby police and fire departments responded to the call of an injured hiker on the mountain, which is on the border of the two towns and near the New Hampshire border. The LifeFlight helicopter was called because the hiker's blood pressure was very low, according to Ashburnham fire Battalion Chief Robert Salo.
"We want to get him to an appropriate facility in a short amount of time," said Salo.
http://www.sentinelandenterprise.com/St ... 76,00.html
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