The last unnamed highpoint..

The last unnamed highpoint..

Joined: April 20th, 2004, 7:19 pm

January 30th, 2005, 12:40 am #1

This should be an interesting thread.

Got my A2Z last week. One of the articles casually mentions that Connecticut's highpoint doesn't have a name. I thought, "Golly gee, he's right!" What has passed as "South slope of Mt. Frissel," of course, is suitable for our purposes.. but my mind, nevertheless, still went to think of possible names that this point can have. Almost immediately, I thought of an obvious answer: Longacre point.

Perhaps I'm totally bonkers here, I suppose the replies to this message will tell. I should mention that I am one of the unlucky ones to get involved in the highpointers club after Jakk's passing; so I never had the priviledge of meeting him. But being that everyone that knew him seems to be highly fond of him, I could tell that he was a great guy.

That said, It seems to me that if we could name any state highpoint after Jakk, it might be Connecticut's. After all, it owes all of its recognition as a destination to the fact that it is the state highpoint. And very few people would be visiting a state highpoint like Connecticut's if it wasn't for Jakk founding the highpointers club.

Being a newbie, I figured I would open a discussion with the club veterans about the appropriatness of this before talking to the authorities about having the highest point in Connecticut given the name "Longacre Point." It seems to me that it would be a very fitting tribute, but heck, what do I know? So what do you think? Is this something worth pursuiting, or am I bonkers?

-stevo
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Joined: December 22nd, 2004, 5:54 pm

January 31st, 2005, 1:35 pm #2

Steve: you should be the president. Naming the Highpoint of Conn. Longacre Point is the best and most refreshing thought to come up in some time. I hope the people in Conn. are just as receiptive. We can start calling the Highpoint Longacre Point unofficially now. How did all the other places get named anyway? By someone's thought or tribute like you. Thank You.
George Johnson, long time highpointer.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 6:42 pm

January 31st, 2005, 7:35 pm #3

This should be an interesting thread.

Got my A2Z last week. One of the articles casually mentions that Connecticut's highpoint doesn't have a name. I thought, "Golly gee, he's right!" What has passed as "South slope of Mt. Frissel," of course, is suitable for our purposes.. but my mind, nevertheless, still went to think of possible names that this point can have. Almost immediately, I thought of an obvious answer: Longacre point.

Perhaps I'm totally bonkers here, I suppose the replies to this message will tell. I should mention that I am one of the unlucky ones to get involved in the highpointers club after Jakk's passing; so I never had the priviledge of meeting him. But being that everyone that knew him seems to be highly fond of him, I could tell that he was a great guy.

That said, It seems to me that if we could name any state highpoint after Jakk, it might be Connecticut's. After all, it owes all of its recognition as a destination to the fact that it is the state highpoint. And very few people would be visiting a state highpoint like Connecticut's if it wasn't for Jakk founding the highpointers club.

Being a newbie, I figured I would open a discussion with the club veterans about the appropriatness of this before talking to the authorities about having the highest point in Connecticut given the name "Longacre Point." It seems to me that it would be a very fitting tribute, but heck, what do I know? So what do you think? Is this something worth pursuiting, or am I bonkers?

-stevo
A point generally denotes a topographic high point. The HP of Connecticut is more of a ridge (or spur) than a point.
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Joined: December 22nd, 2004, 5:54 pm

January 31st, 2005, 7:52 pm #4

Steve, the topographical highpoint of Conn. is the place we're talking about. Did you say you were for or against the idea. I think Jakk would be honored to have a highpoint named after him. I hope this doesn't turn into another arm-chair Highpointer whiner's session that is so pervasive in this forum.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 6:42 pm

January 31st, 2005, 8:01 pm #5

Actually, I didn't say whether I was in favor or opposed to the idea, but, since you asked ....

I think Longacre Ridge would be better than Longacre Point. And, since I don't live in Connecticut or Massachusetts, I will defer to people who live there. In general, I support the guidelines that the U.S. Board on Georgraphic Names has established. These guidelines include not naming any feature after someone who has not been dead at least five years. If a feature is to be named after someone, that person should have had some significant impact in that area, in that state, to the nation, or to the world. Vin Hoeman's quote comes to mind: "Men should be named after mountains, not mountains after men."

No armchair highpointer whining or other name-calling intended.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:07 pm

January 31st, 2005, 9:59 pm #6

This should be an interesting thread.

Got my A2Z last week. One of the articles casually mentions that Connecticut's highpoint doesn't have a name. I thought, "Golly gee, he's right!" What has passed as "South slope of Mt. Frissel," of course, is suitable for our purposes.. but my mind, nevertheless, still went to think of possible names that this point can have. Almost immediately, I thought of an obvious answer: Longacre point.

Perhaps I'm totally bonkers here, I suppose the replies to this message will tell. I should mention that I am one of the unlucky ones to get involved in the highpointers club after Jakk's passing; so I never had the priviledge of meeting him. But being that everyone that knew him seems to be highly fond of him, I could tell that he was a great guy.

That said, It seems to me that if we could name any state highpoint after Jakk, it might be Connecticut's. After all, it owes all of its recognition as a destination to the fact that it is the state highpoint. And very few people would be visiting a state highpoint like Connecticut's if it wasn't for Jakk founding the highpointers club.

Being a newbie, I figured I would open a discussion with the club veterans about the appropriatness of this before talking to the authorities about having the highest point in Connecticut given the name "Longacre Point." It seems to me that it would be a very fitting tribute, but heck, what do I know? So what do you think? Is this something worth pursuiting, or am I bonkers?

-stevo
It surely isn't a point, but it doesn't seem much like a ridge either. Geographically, what is it? It seems like "slope," as unglamourous as it sounds, is the only appropriate term. "Longacre Slope." Hmm, that actually has a nice ring to it...

That said, from a detached lay-perspective it might seem a bit pushy for us as a group to ask the government and the people of Connecticut to officially name a natural earth feature after someone who although he may have made a huge impact on our lives that we are grateful for, didn't exactly have much to do with Connecticut or that spot in particular. By that same token, i think the new Mt. Reagan is ridiculous, and i even deplore street names being changed in honor of people unless they are truly civic heroes like Martin Luther King. Every time i drove down the Mark Macguire Expressway in St. Louis, i would roll my eyes.

I would certainly be in favor of voting to make Longacre Slope the official club name for the place, and listing it that way in our literature along with "Frissel."

Orrrrrr....we could try selling the name to the highest bidder! 3-Com Point, Connecticut? Liberty Mutual.com Slope, Connecticut??
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Joined: August 2nd, 2001, 8:13 pm

January 31st, 2005, 10:27 pm #7

Ah, yes, it's a slippery slope indeed when we start thinking of naming rights. Let's see...Enron Slope? It's downhill all the way from here?

Personally, I thought the temporary renaming of I-70 through St. Louis as the Mark McGwire Expressway was both amusing and appropriate...after all, it was his 70 home runs, so I-70...well, you get it...

Then that usurper out west went and hit 75, so I guess somebody else will have to rename an Interstate after him!! (Mark, is there an I-75 in Hawaii? Love that particular Malapropism...Hawaiian Interstate highways? It's a damp drive off the islands, no???)

Whether we opt for Longacre Ridge, Longacre Point or the possibly-more-accurate Longacre Slope, I'm for naming the spot after Guru Jakk...
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Joined: April 20th, 2004, 7:19 pm

January 31st, 2005, 10:37 pm #8

Actually, I didn't say whether I was in favor or opposed to the idea, but, since you asked ....

I think Longacre Ridge would be better than Longacre Point. And, since I don't live in Connecticut or Massachusetts, I will defer to people who live there. In general, I support the guidelines that the U.S. Board on Georgraphic Names has established. These guidelines include not naming any feature after someone who has not been dead at least five years. If a feature is to be named after someone, that person should have had some significant impact in that area, in that state, to the nation, or to the world. Vin Hoeman's quote comes to mind: "Men should be named after mountains, not mountains after men."

No armchair highpointer whining or other name-calling intended.
that's a good point. technically, we wouldn't be able to have the point/ridge/slope/whatever officially named after jack for about another 18 months - I was aware of this when I posted the original message. however, one factor that helps them make their decision is established usage... so if, 18 months from now, people are calling it longacre whatever, we would have fulfilled that requirement.

for more information: http://geonames.usgs.gov/pppdgn.html

on a lighter note, we can call it longacre peg..


Seriously, I really hope that people don't get into an argument about what to put after Longacre (point, ridge, slope, peg.) That would suck. that's kind of missing the point (no pun intended) of naming it after jakk..
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 5:18 am

February 1st, 2005, 1:08 am #9

Like others here, I like the sentiment and think it's basically a great idea. But I'm not sure trying to go through the USGS is the best approach. Right now, in New York, there's an effort to rename East Dix Mountain to Grace Peak in honor of Grace Hudalowski - a beloved 46R pioneer. I've followed the progress and it has basically required a huge effort by a lot of folks and I don't know that Jack Longacre's name would generate the requisite "local" support - that is by the fine folks of northwestern Connecticut.

From what I understand of Jack Longacre, he was a very informal guy so why not just get a custom-made wooden sign in the shape of a watermelon, haul it on up the slope and plunk it in the ground about two feet into Massachusetts where no one would really care since the point has no significance in that State. Yeah, I know this is not in the best tradition of environmental stewardship, but why not?
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Joined: April 20th, 2004, 7:19 pm

February 1st, 2005, 11:59 am #10

well, at this point we don't have much of a choice with the official name..
but we ought to revisit the issue in 18 months.

right now, just establishing usage, especially local usage, would be a significant accomplishment..
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