The 4,000er in Antarctica

The 4,000er in Antarctica

Joined: April 5th, 2003, 12:03 pm

March 5th, 2005, 8:18 pm #1

The NIMA-data-file for Antarctica contains descriptions of the geographical features of this continent. Some weeks ago a took the effort to extract out of these data a list of all the mountains mentioned there with an elevation of 4'000m or higher. Thought now that it also could be useful to one or the other user in this forum. (Unfortunately the message text does not accept tab-delimited lists.)

Geographical name, Latitude(XX°YY'), Longitude(XXX°YY'), Elevation

Adam, Mount 7147S 16837E 4,010 m
Anderson, Mount 7809S 08613W 4,255 m
Argus, Dome 8100S 07700E just over 4,000 m
Bell, Mount 8404S 16730E 4,305 m
Bentley, Mount 7807S 08614W 4,245 m
Centennial Peak 8457S 17400W 4,070 m
Craddock, Mount 7838S 08512W 4,650 m
Decennial Peak 8422S 16602E 4,020 m
Dickerson, Mount 8420S 16708E 4,120 m
Elizabeth, Mount 8354S 16823E 4,480 m
Epperly, Mount 7826S 08553W over 4,600 m
Fisher, Mount 8506S 17103W 4,080 m
Fleming Summit 8420S 16618E over 4,200 m
Fridtjof Nansen, Mount 8521S 16733W 4,070 m
Gardner, Mount 7823S 08602W 4,685 m
Giovinetto, Mount 7816S 08610W 4,090 m
Kaplan, Mount (in Hughes Range) 8430S 17530E 4,230 m
Kirkpatrick, Mount 8420S 16625E 4,528 m
Korsch, Mount 8252S 16056E c. 4,000 m
Lister, Mount 7804S 16241E 4,025 m
Long Gables (Twin Peaks) 7811S 08614W 4,150 m and 4,110 m
Mackellar, Mount 8359S 16639E 4,295 m
Markham, Mount (Twin Peaks) 8251S 16121E 4,350 m and 4,280 m
Miller, Mount 8320S 16548E 4,160 m
Minto, Mount 7147S 16845E 4,165 m
Ostenso, Mount 7818S 08611W 4,180 m
Royal Society Range 7810S 16240E rising to 4,025 m
Shear, Mount 7820S 08608W over 4,000 m
Shinn, Mount 7827S 08546W over 4,800 m
Sidley, Mount 7702S 12606W 4,285 m
Tyree, Mount 7824S 08555W 4,965 m
Vinson Massif 7835S 08525W 4,897 m
Wade, Mount 8451S 17419W 4,085 m
Wexler, Mount 8430S 17501E 4,025 m
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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 6:08 am

March 5th, 2005, 8:56 pm #2

By this data set, Mt. Tyree (4,965 m) has overtaken Vinson Massif (4,897 m)!
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Joined: April 5th, 2003, 12:03 pm

March 5th, 2005, 10:45 pm #3

The NIMA-data-file for Antarctica contains descriptions of the geographical features of this continent. Some weeks ago a took the effort to extract out of these data a list of all the mountains mentioned there with an elevation of 4'000m or higher. Thought now that it also could be useful to one or the other user in this forum. (Unfortunately the message text does not accept tab-delimited lists.)

Geographical name, Latitude(XX°YY'), Longitude(XXX°YY'), Elevation

Adam, Mount 7147S 16837E 4,010 m
Anderson, Mount 7809S 08613W 4,255 m
Argus, Dome 8100S 07700E just over 4,000 m
Bell, Mount 8404S 16730E 4,305 m
Bentley, Mount 7807S 08614W 4,245 m
Centennial Peak 8457S 17400W 4,070 m
Craddock, Mount 7838S 08512W 4,650 m
Decennial Peak 8422S 16602E 4,020 m
Dickerson, Mount 8420S 16708E 4,120 m
Elizabeth, Mount 8354S 16823E 4,480 m
Epperly, Mount 7826S 08553W over 4,600 m
Fisher, Mount 8506S 17103W 4,080 m
Fleming Summit 8420S 16618E over 4,200 m
Fridtjof Nansen, Mount 8521S 16733W 4,070 m
Gardner, Mount 7823S 08602W 4,685 m
Giovinetto, Mount 7816S 08610W 4,090 m
Kaplan, Mount (in Hughes Range) 8430S 17530E 4,230 m
Kirkpatrick, Mount 8420S 16625E 4,528 m
Korsch, Mount 8252S 16056E c. 4,000 m
Lister, Mount 7804S 16241E 4,025 m
Long Gables (Twin Peaks) 7811S 08614W 4,150 m and 4,110 m
Mackellar, Mount 8359S 16639E 4,295 m
Markham, Mount (Twin Peaks) 8251S 16121E 4,350 m and 4,280 m
Miller, Mount 8320S 16548E 4,160 m
Minto, Mount 7147S 16845E 4,165 m
Ostenso, Mount 7818S 08611W 4,180 m
Royal Society Range 7810S 16240E rising to 4,025 m
Shear, Mount 7820S 08608W over 4,000 m
Shinn, Mount 7827S 08546W over 4,800 m
Sidley, Mount 7702S 12606W 4,285 m
Tyree, Mount 7824S 08555W 4,965 m
Vinson Massif 7835S 08525W 4,897 m
Wade, Mount 8451S 17419W 4,085 m
Wexler, Mount 8430S 17501E 4,025 m
The CIA World Fact Book indicates for Vinson Massif a height of 4,897m. I changed only this value of the data file, since I thought that the information in the CIA Fact Book is more recent. Sorry for not indicating this already before.

I add here the relevant parts of the data file and of the CIA Fact Book:


Sentinel Range 7810S, 08530W
A major mountain range situated northward of Minnesota Glacier
and forming the northern half of the Ellsworth Mountains. The
range trends NNW-SSE for about 115 mi and is 15 to 30 mi wide.
Many peaks rise over 4,000 m and Vinson Massif (5,140 m) in the
southern part of the range is the highest elevation on the
continent. The range was first sighted and photographed from the
air on Nov. 23, 1935, by Lincoln Ellsworth who in naming it
recognised its prominent position as a landmark on an otherwise
featureless ice surface. The range was first visited and
partially surveyed in January 1958 by the Marie Byrd Land
Traverse party, led by Charles R. Bentley. The entire range was
mapped by USGS from aerial photography taken by U.S. Navy,
1958-61.

Tyree, Mount 7824S, 08555W
A very high and prominent bare-rock mountain (4,965 m) standing 8
mi NW of Vinson Massif in the main ridge of the Sentinel Range,
Ellsworth Mountains. It was discovered by USN Squadron VX-6
during IGY reconnaissance flights of January 1958, and was mapped
the same month by the Marie Byrd Land Traverse Party, 1957-58,
under C.R. Bentley. Named by US-ACAN for Rear Admiral David M.
Tyree, USN, Commander, U.S. Naval Support Force, Antarctica, from
Apr. 14, 1959 to Nov. 26, 1962.

Vinson Massif 7835S, 08525W
A large mountain massif in the southern portion of the main ridge
of the Sentinel Range, Ellsworth Mountains. The massif is about
13 mi long and 8 mi wide and has a height of 5,140 m, the highest
elevation in Antarctica. First seen on reconnaissance flights of
U.S. Naval aircraft from Byrd Station in January 1958. Named by
the US-ACAN for Rep. Carl G. Vinson of Georgia, Chairman of the
House Naval Affairs Committee and later of the House Armed
Services Committee, whose active interest and vision played a
large part in U.S. Government support of Antarctic exploration in
the period 1935-61.


CIA World Fact Book:

Elevation extremes:
lowest point: Bentley Subglacial Trench -2,555 m
highest point: Vinson Massif 4,897 m note: the lowest known land point in Antarctica is hidden in the Bentley Subglacial Trench; at its surface is the deepest ice yet discovered and the world's lowest elevation not under seawater
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Joined: April 5th, 2003, 12:03 pm

March 6th, 2005, 9:13 am #4

Downloaded again the latest available version of the data file from USGS (GNIS). This file was last updated on 6th August 2004. The height for Vinson Massif has partialy been corrected.

Here a copy of the relevant parts:

Sentinel Range 00013574 7810S 08530W
A major mountain range situated northward of Minnesota Glacier and forming the
northern half of the Ellsworth Mountains. The range trends NNW-SSE for about 115
mi and is 15 to 30 mi wide. Many peaks rise over 4,000 m and Vinson Massif
(5,140 m) in the southern part of the range is the highest elevation on the
continent. The range was first sighted and photographed from the air on Nov.
23, 1935, by Lincoln Ellsworth who in naming it recognised its prominent
position as a landmark on an otherwise featureless ice surface. The range was
first visited and partially surveyed in January 1958 by the Marie Byrd Land
Traverse party, led by Charles R. Bentley. The entire range was mapped by USGS
from aerial photography taken by U.S. Navy, 1958-61.

Tyree, Mount 00015732 7824S 08555W
A very high and prominent bare-rock mountain (4,965 m) standing 8 mi NW of
Vinson Massif in the main ridge of the Sentinel Range, Ellsworth Mountains. It
was discovered by USN Squadron VX-6 during IGY reconnaissance flights of January
1958, and was mapped the same month by the Marie Byrd Land Traverse Party,
1957-58, under C.R. Bentley. Named by US-ACAN for Rear Admiral David M. Tyree,
USN, Commander, U.S. Naval Support Force, Antarctica, from Apr. 14, 1959 to Nov.
26, 1962.

Vinson Massif 00016082 7835S 08525W
A large mountain massif in the southern portion of the main ridge of the
Sentinel Range, Ellsworth Mountains. The massif is about 13 mi long and 8 mi
wide and has a height of 4,897 m, the highest elevation in Antarctica. First
seen on reconnaissance flights of U.S. Naval aircraft from Byrd Station in
January 1958. Named by the US-ACAN for Rep. Carl G. Vinson of Georgia, Chairman
of the House Naval Affairs Committee and later of the House Armed Services
Committee, whose active interest and vision played a large part in U.S.
Government support of Antarctic exploration in the period 1935-61.
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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 6:08 am

March 6th, 2005, 4:00 pm #5

By my calculations, that 5,140 m figure for Vinson equates to 16,863.312.' Both Summitpost.com and 7summits.com use the 4,897 m figure, or 16,067' figure, though Summitpost.com mentions that a recent expedition used GPS to get a height of 16,077.'

Tyree at 4,965 m would equate to 16,289.172.'

A little Google searching yielded the following link that seems to provide a good history on the height reductions of Vinson and Tyree in the context of an expedition to more accurately measure the height of Antarctica's third highest peak, Mt. Shinn:
http://www.theomegafoundation.org/shinn ... report.htm

The following quote describes the efforts of a 1979-80 expedition:
"Thus the height of Vinson’s main summit was reduced from 5140m to 4897m. The official height of Mt. Tyree was also reduced to 4852m, but no height was ever published for Mt. Shinn – either before or after the 1979 work."
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Joined: April 5th, 2003, 12:03 pm

March 6th, 2005, 4:43 pm #6

.. for finding this web page with the missing information.

Marcel
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Joined: February 19th, 2005, 4:34 am

March 25th, 2005, 4:44 am #7

By this data set, Mt. Tyree (4,965 m) has overtaken Vinson Massif (4,897 m)!
in the NOVA expedition (2000?) with Conrad Anker didn't they do an official reading of Vincent's elevation
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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 6:08 am

March 25th, 2005, 5:13 am #8

Yes, according to information on the Summitpost Vinson page, the group used GPS to arrive at a 16,077' elevation for Vinson, up from 16,067.' So chronologically, the 1979-80 expedition reduced the heights of both Vinson and Tyree, while the 2000(?) Anker / Krakauer / Hahn expedition bumped up Vinson's height slightly.

Am I showing myself to be a true Vinson geek? Maybe, but that's one highpoint I'd love to climb.
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Joined: April 5th, 2003, 12:03 pm

March 28th, 2005, 9:23 pm #9

After informing GNIS on the inconsistencies in their data file, I received the following e-mail:

quote

Dear Mr. Tschudin,

The correct elevation for Mount Tyree is 4,852 meters, and Vinson Massif is
still the highest elevation in Antarctica It is correct in our database,
but not reflected in the 06 Aug 2004 topical file. We apologize for this
oversight and will update the file.

Sincerely,

Lou Yost
for Manager GNIS

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Joined: June 26th, 2005, 1:44 pm

June 26th, 2005, 1:56 pm #10

.. for finding this web page with the missing information.

Marcel
Guys,

I'm the one who measured Shinn in 2002 and wrote some of the articles quoted in this thread.

Last Nov we re-measured Vinson (check the Omega site ref above) and got 4892m, so 5m lower ! But really this is within the +/-5m that the USGS put on such heights anyway, at least for Antarctica, so we are not claiming anything dramatic.

We also measured the sub-peaks of Vinson (9 of them, only one previously climbed) and found that 'Kershaw Peak' was only 27m lower than Vinson main summit. But those sub-peaks are not really individual mountains, just peaks, so Tyree is still the real #2.

In Nov we are going to Tyree, Craddock and Gardner.

D
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