Ted Keizer Seeking to Climb All South 6000 Foot Peaks This Week

roger
roger

June 18th, 2003, 1:49 pm #1

An Oregon man who holds speed-climbing records is dashing nearly round-the-clock through the N.C. and Tennessee mountains to climb all the 6,000-foot-plus peaks in one week.

Speed hiker Ted Keizer started at 5:45 a.m. Sunday at the summit of Clingman's Dome in Great Smoky Mountains National Park and, by Tuesday, had bagged 26 of the 40 peaks.
A slender, 155-pound human greyhound, Keizer, 31, hopes to reach the summit of all 40 by week's end. He hikes day and night with 90 minutes of sleep every 24 hours.
Most of the 6,000-footers lie in North Carolina; a few are in Tennessee. Hikers consider it an achievement to reach all the summits; about 100 people have done so, according to the Carolina Mountain Club in Asheville. Most take several years to get all 40. The club and two others in Tennessee sponsor "South Beyond 6000," which Keizer learned of a year or so ago.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/n ... 112273.htm

Articles on Forum on Keizer's California and Colorado Fourteener records, Catskill 3500, etc.
http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/sea ... erm=keizer
Quote
Share

David Metsky
David Metsky

June 21st, 2003, 3:20 am #2

Teddy did it again.

http://www.thecavedog.com/

-dave-
Quote
Share

Mark S
Mark S

June 21st, 2003, 5:52 pm #3

Woof woof
Quote
Share

Mr. Modest
Mr. Modest

June 23rd, 2003, 9:26 pm #4

An Oregon man who holds speed-climbing records is dashing nearly round-the-clock through the N.C. and Tennessee mountains to climb all the 6,000-foot-plus peaks in one week.

Speed hiker Ted Keizer started at 5:45 a.m. Sunday at the summit of Clingman's Dome in Great Smoky Mountains National Park and, by Tuesday, had bagged 26 of the 40 peaks.
A slender, 155-pound human greyhound, Keizer, 31, hopes to reach the summit of all 40 by week's end. He hikes day and night with 90 minutes of sleep every 24 hours.
Most of the 6,000-footers lie in North Carolina; a few are in Tennessee. Hikers consider it an achievement to reach all the summits; about 100 people have done so, according to the Carolina Mountain Club in Asheville. Most take several years to get all 40. The club and two others in Tennessee sponsor "South Beyond 6000," which Keizer learned of a year or so ago.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/n ... 112273.htm

Articles on Forum on Keizer's California and Colorado Fourteener records, Catskill 3500, etc.
http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/sea ... erm=keizer
This is a great physical and mental acheivement as were his other adventures, but to dedicate a web site to yourself, contact reporters to do stories about yourself, do an 8-page plus write up about your progress, and then report to the world that you have done this and that you have done that, in time that must be impressive, makes me, and others, think that Cave Dog maybe should be called... Media Hog? The reports of his stories being "inspiring" could be a facade. If we are so inspired by this man, how many will attempt to repeat his marathons, and could all these people not be inspired if they knew not specifically who did it? Some question his shameless acts of self-promotion.
Quote
Share

steve
steve

June 23rd, 2003, 9:38 pm #5

my god, what's the matter with you? a guy does something impressive- indeed, he sets a world record, and you have the gall to criticize him for putting up a freakin' web site? get over it. I, for one, am glad that he's a self-promoter - otherwise I wouldn't get to read his site, which I find fascinating.
Quote
Share

Sean Cunniff
Sean Cunniff

June 23rd, 2003, 10:06 pm #6

This is a great physical and mental acheivement as were his other adventures, but to dedicate a web site to yourself, contact reporters to do stories about yourself, do an 8-page plus write up about your progress, and then report to the world that you have done this and that you have done that, in time that must be impressive, makes me, and others, think that Cave Dog maybe should be called... Media Hog? The reports of his stories being "inspiring" could be a facade. If we are so inspired by this man, how many will attempt to repeat his marathons, and could all these people not be inspired if they knew not specifically who did it? Some question his shameless acts of self-promotion.
I don't really understand your point. There has to be 10 million Americans who have their own websites that relay their personal experiences. All you need to do is look at the highpointers web ring.

If anyone has personal experiences that are interesting and worthy of putting on the internet its Cave Dog. His accomplishments are staggering and deserve whatever publicity they generate.

Also, there is a practical question. Cave Dog's missions are very time intensive. On his website it indicates he's been scouting the south sixers since April. It is a full-time undertaking. Maybe the website will allow him to generate some sponsorship cash and continue with his incredible achievements.

He's certainly a lot more worthy of sponsorship than most.

Quote
Share

Sean Cunniff
Sean Cunniff

June 23rd, 2003, 10:10 pm #7

Teddy did it again.

http://www.thecavedog.com/

-dave-
Hiker speeds to record
Man hikes 40 area peaks, of 6,000 feet or higher, in less than 5 days
JACK HORAN
Special Correspondent

ROAN MOUNTAIN - In the pre-dawn darkness, the distant light from the headlamp of speed hiker Ted Keizer danced about.

The suspended light moved along the Appalachian Trail on Friday at an increasingly faster rate.

Then Keizer's supporters, who had waited in a chill fog for three hours, realized the Coos Bay, Ore., extreme athlete was sprinting. Running, mind you. Running up a mountain after five days of nearly round-the-clock speed hiking and peak climbing covering 300 miles.

They cheered as Keizer reached the summit of Grassy Ridge, elevation 6,160 feet, and fell into embraces in celebration. He had just established a speed record, from 5:45 a.m. Sunday to 5:13 a.m. Friday, for climbing all 40 peaks in North Carolina and Tennessee with elevations 6,000 feet and higher.

http://www.charlotte.com/mld/charlotte/ ... 143761.htm
Quote
Share

Mark S
Mark S

June 24th, 2003, 1:18 am #8

This is a great physical and mental acheivement as were his other adventures, but to dedicate a web site to yourself, contact reporters to do stories about yourself, do an 8-page plus write up about your progress, and then report to the world that you have done this and that you have done that, in time that must be impressive, makes me, and others, think that Cave Dog maybe should be called... Media Hog? The reports of his stories being "inspiring" could be a facade. If we are so inspired by this man, how many will attempt to repeat his marathons, and could all these people not be inspired if they knew not specifically who did it? Some question his shameless acts of self-promotion.
I agree with the above posts. Also, Keizer could not have accomplished all the speed records that he has as a one man show. His team is as much an integral part of his success as are his own talents. As much as anything else, his website is dedicated to pumping up members of the Dog Team.

He is of a different mentality than the average Joe and I think many of us who love the outdoors envy CaveDog to one extent or another. How great it must be to not only have the talent to do what he's done, but also the backing of others as well as the time and money. Yes, he may be a bit of a self-promoter, but he has definitely created something special.
Quote
Share

Donnie
Donnie

June 24th, 2003, 11:43 am #9

This is a great physical and mental acheivement as were his other adventures, but to dedicate a web site to yourself, contact reporters to do stories about yourself, do an 8-page plus write up about your progress, and then report to the world that you have done this and that you have done that, in time that must be impressive, makes me, and others, think that Cave Dog maybe should be called... Media Hog? The reports of his stories being "inspiring" could be a facade. If we are so inspired by this man, how many will attempt to repeat his marathons, and could all these people not be inspired if they knew not specifically who did it? Some question his shameless acts of self-promotion.
This guy can promote all he wants. Great job dog!!!
Quote
Share

Jon M
Jon M

June 24th, 2003, 3:34 pm #10

I agree with the above posts. Also, Keizer could not have accomplished all the speed records that he has as a one man show. His team is as much an integral part of his success as are his own talents. As much as anything else, his website is dedicated to pumping up members of the Dog Team.

He is of a different mentality than the average Joe and I think many of us who love the outdoors envy CaveDog to one extent or another. How great it must be to not only have the talent to do what he's done, but also the backing of others as well as the time and money. Yes, he may be a bit of a self-promoter, but he has definitely created something special.
Personally, I don't see what this guy is doing has anything to do with outdoor activity - he might as well be doing a 4 day indoor marathon.
I dislike these type of speed attempts - running/jogging on trails that are meant for hiking.
Quote
Share