Solo British balloonist plans to hop over Everest on hot air in 2001

Solo British balloonist plans to hop over Everest on hot air in 2001

roger
roger

August 6th, 2001, 1:02 pm #1

The London Times on Sunday, Aug. 5, has an article on David Hempleman-Adams who plans to become the first soloist to balloon across the top of Everest.

A hot air balloon went over Everst in 1991 with Leo Dickinson and Andy Elson in 1991.

This two-hour trip could be harder as it starts on the plains of China and ends in the mountains of Nepal. Winds are expected to be about 100 mph and temperatures at -50 degrees.

More:
http://www.sunday-times.co.uk/news/page ... 02007.html
Last edited by dipper on March 24th, 2004, 3:36 am, edited 1 time in total.
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roger
roger

September 19th, 2001, 2:05 pm #2

September 18, 2001 A British adventurer's mission to become the first person to fly solo in a hot-air balloon over Mount Everest has been stalled after China refused to allow his balloon into their airspace.

Hempleman-Adams and his expedition, Cadbury Everest Challenge, needed special permission from the Chinese government because the northern side of Mount Everest lies in Tibet. They had received permission from the Tibet Mountaineering Association and expected the Chinese government to comply, reports the Deutsche Presse-Agentur. However, China refused the request, most likely as a result of last week's terrorist attacks.

http://www.outsidemag.com/news/headline ... _tue2.html
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roger
roger

February 20th, 2002, 5:44 pm #3

Tom Bernard, longtime Eastside business and civic leader, is preparing for high adventure: taking a hot air balloon over Mount Rainier. This journey would be a first in the annals of ballooning.

In 1986, Bernard and Bellevue's Ron Dunlap were set to make the same breathless, one-of-a-kind trip, sponsored by Rainier Beer, but the balloonist they hired changed plans.


With Johnson's guidance, Bernard commissioned Mid-west balloon maker Aero Star to build a 245,000-cubic-foot balloon.
This blue and yellow mammoth is 110 feet tall, about the size of a nine-story building. It is 81 feet in diameter and costs about the same as a new Jaguar. There are three 20-foot by 40-foot areas blocked off for sponsor names. The tough material used in the balloon's fabric is also used for the parachutes that slow the space shuttle landings.

They'll make the four- to five-hour trip, reaching altitudes of 20,000 feet and experiencing temperatures of 30 degrees below zero, before the end of April this year. They will land in the Yakima Valley. The FAA has re-approved their application for the flight.
``We had applied before September 11, but since we would be up in airplane space, it was on hold. Now it's been cleared again,'' Bernard says.
``It's never been done before. It's a dream. It's fun. It's a world-class experience and it's something wonderful to do with my son.''
http://www.eastsidejournal.com/sited/story/html/83081
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roger
roger

March 20th, 2002, 3:01 pm #4

September 18, 2001 A British adventurer's mission to become the first person to fly solo in a hot-air balloon over Mount Everest has been stalled after China refused to allow his balloon into their airspace.

Hempleman-Adams and his expedition, Cadbury Everest Challenge, needed special permission from the Chinese government because the northern side of Mount Everest lies in Tibet. They had received permission from the Tibet Mountaineering Association and expected the Chinese government to comply, reports the Deutsche Presse-Agentur. However, China refused the request, most likely as a result of last week's terrorist attacks.

http://www.outsidemag.com/news/headline ... _tue2.html
I'm not totally in touch with the Himalayas but this article refers to Xixabangma being Tibet's highest point (although Everest has the claim for Tibert). Can anybody explain?
FRIENDS, family and well-wishers gathered at Changi Airport early yesterday morning to wish three intrepid mountaineers good luck as they flew off on their expedition to conquer Tibet's highest peak.
They will climb Mount Xixabangma Alpine-style, with no conventional aids such as extra oxygen, Sherpa porters, pre-built tents or pre-laid ropes.
'Fewer than 1 per cent of all climbs are done this way,' he told The Straits Times on Friday night.
http://straitstimes.asia1.com.sg/singap ... 94,00.html?


Expedition Page:
http://www.xixa.com.sg/
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-adam
-adam

March 20th, 2002, 3:29 pm #5

"Xixabangma (8027m) is the 14th highest mountain in the world and is the highest peak located entirely in Tibet, China. It was also the last of the 14 mountains above 8000m to be climbed."

from:
http://www.xixa.com.sg/mountain/mountain_facts.asp

-adam
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Mark S
Mark S

March 20th, 2002, 3:32 pm #6

I'm not totally in touch with the Himalayas but this article refers to Xixabangma being Tibet's highest point (although Everest has the claim for Tibert). Can anybody explain?
FRIENDS, family and well-wishers gathered at Changi Airport early yesterday morning to wish three intrepid mountaineers good luck as they flew off on their expedition to conquer Tibet's highest peak.
They will climb Mount Xixabangma Alpine-style, with no conventional aids such as extra oxygen, Sherpa porters, pre-built tents or pre-laid ropes.
'Fewer than 1 per cent of all climbs are done this way,' he told The Straits Times on Friday night.
http://straitstimes.asia1.com.sg/singap ... 94,00.html?


Expedition Page:
http://www.xixa.com.sg/
At 8027 meters, Shishapangma is the lowest of the 14 8000 meter peaks. I'm about as familiar with the Himalayas as you, Roger, but I believe Everest along with Lhotse, Makalu and Cho Oyu all border the Nepal/Tibet border. My guess would be that the actual summits of these mountains are in Nepal. Shishapangma, on the other hand, is the only 8,000 meter peak entirely within the borders of Tibet.
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Alison
Alison

March 25th, 2002, 8:22 pm #7

I'm not totally in touch with the Himalayas but this article refers to Xixabangma being Tibet's highest point (although Everest has the claim for Tibert). Can anybody explain?
FRIENDS, family and well-wishers gathered at Changi Airport early yesterday morning to wish three intrepid mountaineers good luck as they flew off on their expedition to conquer Tibet's highest peak.
They will climb Mount Xixabangma Alpine-style, with no conventional aids such as extra oxygen, Sherpa porters, pre-built tents or pre-laid ropes.
'Fewer than 1 per cent of all climbs are done this way,' he told The Straits Times on Friday night.
http://straitstimes.asia1.com.sg/singap ... 94,00.html?


Expedition Page:
http://www.xixa.com.sg/
Hey!
How are you? can you help me find a mountain that is about 3 miles high? please write back as soon as possible! thank you!!!

alison
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roger
roger

April 23rd, 2002, 3:31 pm #8

Tom Bernard, longtime Eastside business and civic leader, is preparing for high adventure: taking a hot air balloon over Mount Rainier. This journey would be a first in the annals of ballooning.

In 1986, Bernard and Bellevue's Ron Dunlap were set to make the same breathless, one-of-a-kind trip, sponsored by Rainier Beer, but the balloonist they hired changed plans.


With Johnson's guidance, Bernard commissioned Mid-west balloon maker Aero Star to build a 245,000-cubic-foot balloon.
This blue and yellow mammoth is 110 feet tall, about the size of a nine-story building. It is 81 feet in diameter and costs about the same as a new Jaguar. There are three 20-foot by 40-foot areas blocked off for sponsor names. The tough material used in the balloon's fabric is also used for the parachutes that slow the space shuttle landings.

They'll make the four- to five-hour trip, reaching altitudes of 20,000 feet and experiencing temperatures of 30 degrees below zero, before the end of April this year. They will land in the Yakima Valley. The FAA has re-approved their application for the flight.
``We had applied before September 11, but since we would be up in airplane space, it was on hold. Now it's been cleared again,'' Bernard says.
``It's never been done before. It's a dream. It's fun. It's a world-class experience and it's something wonderful to do with my son.''
http://www.eastsidejournal.com/sited/story/html/83081
Spring is the time to hike the Skyline Trail above the Yakima River. The scenery is spectacular and you don't have to contend with the oppressive summer heat.
http://www.spokesmanreview.com/news-sto ... ion.sports

Seattle Post Intelligencer Article:
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/getaways/ ... ike29.html
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Karl Heller
Karl Heller

April 24th, 2002, 6:33 pm #9

Roger, you are giving me flashbacks with this posting. The Army graciously provided me with several all expense paid trips to the Yakima Firing Range while I was stationed at Fort Lewis, Washington. All I can remember of that place is extreme heat, snakes, and a very dusty and dry desert floor. We went out there the summer following the blast at Mt. St. Helens and there was about 4-6 inches of pulverized ash on the ground. We had to wear surgical masks the entire time (that was when we weren't wearing gas masks, which is worse) in order to protect our lungs from the acidic ash. What a garden spot!! The upside is that if you are crazy enough to go out there you will probably be hiking alone.

It does look pretty from the photo you have provided. Perhaps it is all different when you are not sucking it up digging and refilling foxholes for three to four weeks at a time in the summer heat.
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WingLady
WingLady

April 24th, 2002, 11:10 pm #10

Hey!
How are you? can you help me find a mountain that is about 3 miles high? please write back as soon as possible! thank you!!!

alison
(sorry, couldn't help myself)

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