Smokies on 'Most Endangered Parks List''

Smokies on 'Most Endangered Parks List''

Craig
Craig

January 16th, 2003, 3:54 am #1

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Knoxville News-Sentinel

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Smokies on 'Most Endangered Parks' list fifth year in a row

By Staff and wire
January 15, 2003

WASHINGTON - Air pollution, motorized vehicles and nearby development plans threaten some of the nation's treasured national parks, adding to pressures from money woes and Bush administration policies, a park advocacy group says.

The National Parks Conservation Association on Tuesday released its annual list of "America's Ten Most Endangered National Parks," which includes some reprised from previous years because of what the group calls persistent problems.

"Designation as a national park alone doesn't protect our parks," NPCA senior vice president Ronald J. Tipton said. "Parks also need strong support from the president and Congress."

The Great Smoky Mountains National Park made the list because of its status as the most air-polluted park in the nation.

Don Barger, executive director of the Southeast regional office of the National Parks Conservation Association, said the Smokies' inclusion on the list for the fifth year in a row might have a silver lining.

"People are now aware that the park has a serious air pollution problem," Barger said. "Air pollution in the park also affects communities. It's not just an eco-system problem, it's also our lungs."

The list includes Big Thicket National Preserve in Texas, where nearby private land sales could encroach on wildlife habitat; Denali National Park and Preserve in Alaska, where wilderness could be opened to motorized access and a new route approved into the park.

It also includes Joshua Tree National Park in California, where an adjacent new city may sprout; Shenandoah National Park in Virginia, facing air pollution and invasive species; and Virgin Islands National Park, troubled by fragile coral reefs and declining fish populations.

Parks that made the list this year and last are Everglades National Park in Florida, with questions about management and funding; Glacier National Park in Montana, because of development, infrastructure problems and global warming; Ocmulgee National Monument in Georgia, threatened by a decaying archaeological collection and a proposed highway; and Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, Montana and Idaho, with air pollution and noise from snowmobiles.

Elaine Sevy, a spokeswoman for the National Park Service, said the Bush administration appreciates the group's efforts to bring attention to park problems.

But she said the administration but does not agree with all the group's findings, such as snowmobiles at Yellowstone, which the administration believes can be safely managed using the latest technology.
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roger
roger

January 15th, 2004, 3:31 pm #2

Big Thicket National Preserve
Biscayne National Park
Everglades National Park
Great Smoky Mountains National Park
Joshua Tree National Park
Organ Pipe Cactus
Shenandoah National Park
Underground Railroad
Wrangell-St. Elias
Yellowstone National Park

http://www.npca.org/across_the_nation/t ... endangered/
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John M
John M

January 15th, 2004, 3:35 pm #3

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Knoxville News-Sentinel

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Smokies on 'Most Endangered Parks' list fifth year in a row

By Staff and wire
January 15, 2003

WASHINGTON - Air pollution, motorized vehicles and nearby development plans threaten some of the nation's treasured national parks, adding to pressures from money woes and Bush administration policies, a park advocacy group says.

The National Parks Conservation Association on Tuesday released its annual list of "America's Ten Most Endangered National Parks," which includes some reprised from previous years because of what the group calls persistent problems.

"Designation as a national park alone doesn't protect our parks," NPCA senior vice president Ronald J. Tipton said. "Parks also need strong support from the president and Congress."

The Great Smoky Mountains National Park made the list because of its status as the most air-polluted park in the nation.

Don Barger, executive director of the Southeast regional office of the National Parks Conservation Association, said the Smokies' inclusion on the list for the fifth year in a row might have a silver lining.

"People are now aware that the park has a serious air pollution problem," Barger said. "Air pollution in the park also affects communities. It's not just an eco-system problem, it's also our lungs."

The list includes Big Thicket National Preserve in Texas, where nearby private land sales could encroach on wildlife habitat; Denali National Park and Preserve in Alaska, where wilderness could be opened to motorized access and a new route approved into the park.

It also includes Joshua Tree National Park in California, where an adjacent new city may sprout; Shenandoah National Park in Virginia, facing air pollution and invasive species; and Virgin Islands National Park, troubled by fragile coral reefs and declining fish populations.

Parks that made the list this year and last are Everglades National Park in Florida, with questions about management and funding; Glacier National Park in Montana, because of development, infrastructure problems and global warming; Ocmulgee National Monument in Georgia, threatened by a decaying archaeological collection and a proposed highway; and Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, Montana and Idaho, with air pollution and noise from snowmobiles.

Elaine Sevy, a spokeswoman for the National Park Service, said the Bush administration appreciates the group's efforts to bring attention to park problems.

But she said the administration but does not agree with all the group's findings, such as snowmobiles at Yellowstone, which the administration believes can be safely managed using the latest technology.
I hear that this NP may be downgraded. Apparently the destruction of forest is so significant that it's not worth preserving at the NP level. Anyone know more?
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Bob
Bob

January 16th, 2004, 2:57 pm #4

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Knoxville News-Sentinel

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Smokies on 'Most Endangered Parks' list fifth year in a row

By Staff and wire
January 15, 2003

WASHINGTON - Air pollution, motorized vehicles and nearby development plans threaten some of the nation's treasured national parks, adding to pressures from money woes and Bush administration policies, a park advocacy group says.

The National Parks Conservation Association on Tuesday released its annual list of "America's Ten Most Endangered National Parks," which includes some reprised from previous years because of what the group calls persistent problems.

"Designation as a national park alone doesn't protect our parks," NPCA senior vice president Ronald J. Tipton said. "Parks also need strong support from the president and Congress."

The Great Smoky Mountains National Park made the list because of its status as the most air-polluted park in the nation.

Don Barger, executive director of the Southeast regional office of the National Parks Conservation Association, said the Smokies' inclusion on the list for the fifth year in a row might have a silver lining.

"People are now aware that the park has a serious air pollution problem," Barger said. "Air pollution in the park also affects communities. It's not just an eco-system problem, it's also our lungs."

The list includes Big Thicket National Preserve in Texas, where nearby private land sales could encroach on wildlife habitat; Denali National Park and Preserve in Alaska, where wilderness could be opened to motorized access and a new route approved into the park.

It also includes Joshua Tree National Park in California, where an adjacent new city may sprout; Shenandoah National Park in Virginia, facing air pollution and invasive species; and Virgin Islands National Park, troubled by fragile coral reefs and declining fish populations.

Parks that made the list this year and last are Everglades National Park in Florida, with questions about management and funding; Glacier National Park in Montana, because of development, infrastructure problems and global warming; Ocmulgee National Monument in Georgia, threatened by a decaying archaeological collection and a proposed highway; and Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, Montana and Idaho, with air pollution and noise from snowmobiles.

Elaine Sevy, a spokeswoman for the National Park Service, said the Bush administration appreciates the group's efforts to bring attention to park problems.

But she said the administration but does not agree with all the group's findings, such as snowmobiles at Yellowstone, which the administration believes can be safely managed using the latest technology.
By Jim Mann
The Daily Inter Lake

Glacier National Park is no longer one of the nation's top 10 "endangered parks," but Yellowstone National Park remains on the National Parks Conservation Association's annual list. Glacier and Yellowstone have been regulars on the list in recent years, but contrasts between the two parks have emerged, said Steve Thompson, the association's Glacier Park field representative. "Glacier is no longer on the list because, quite simply, there's a lot of positive things happening around Glacier right now. There remain a lot of challenges, but I feel like this community, in particular, is really beginning to pull together to help protect this national treasure," Thompson said. Glacier has improved in a number of areas, many of which reflect broad support, Thompson said. Reconstruction plans for the historic Going-to-the-Sun Road, for instance, have been smoothly developed with community, business and congressional support. Efforts to address the issue of non-native fish in park waters have recently been beefed up, Thompson said, and there is growing support for an expansion of Canada's Waterton Lakes National Park, Glacier's "peace park" neighbor to the north. Thompson said Glacier still has problems to contend with, however. "Funding for natural resource management and visitor interpretation has dropped in real dollars since last year, despite 2000 campaign promises from President Bush to provide full funding for our national parks," he said.
More information is available at: http://www.dailyinterlake.com/NewsEngin ... -815350-49
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John M.
John M.

January 16th, 2004, 6:41 pm #5

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Knoxville News-Sentinel

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Smokies on 'Most Endangered Parks' list fifth year in a row

By Staff and wire
January 15, 2003

WASHINGTON - Air pollution, motorized vehicles and nearby development plans threaten some of the nation's treasured national parks, adding to pressures from money woes and Bush administration policies, a park advocacy group says.

The National Parks Conservation Association on Tuesday released its annual list of "America's Ten Most Endangered National Parks," which includes some reprised from previous years because of what the group calls persistent problems.

"Designation as a national park alone doesn't protect our parks," NPCA senior vice president Ronald J. Tipton said. "Parks also need strong support from the president and Congress."

The Great Smoky Mountains National Park made the list because of its status as the most air-polluted park in the nation.

Don Barger, executive director of the Southeast regional office of the National Parks Conservation Association, said the Smokies' inclusion on the list for the fifth year in a row might have a silver lining.

"People are now aware that the park has a serious air pollution problem," Barger said. "Air pollution in the park also affects communities. It's not just an eco-system problem, it's also our lungs."

The list includes Big Thicket National Preserve in Texas, where nearby private land sales could encroach on wildlife habitat; Denali National Park and Preserve in Alaska, where wilderness could be opened to motorized access and a new route approved into the park.

It also includes Joshua Tree National Park in California, where an adjacent new city may sprout; Shenandoah National Park in Virginia, facing air pollution and invasive species; and Virgin Islands National Park, troubled by fragile coral reefs and declining fish populations.

Parks that made the list this year and last are Everglades National Park in Florida, with questions about management and funding; Glacier National Park in Montana, because of development, infrastructure problems and global warming; Ocmulgee National Monument in Georgia, threatened by a decaying archaeological collection and a proposed highway; and Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming, Montana and Idaho, with air pollution and noise from snowmobiles.

Elaine Sevy, a spokeswoman for the National Park Service, said the Bush administration appreciates the group's efforts to bring attention to park problems.

But she said the administration but does not agree with all the group's findings, such as snowmobiles at Yellowstone, which the administration believes can be safely managed using the latest technology.
There have been several national parks which have been downgraded over the years. - John M.

Example:
Ft. Henry National Park, Maryland
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Steve Gruhn
Steve Gruhn

January 16th, 2004, 6:46 pm #6

At the risk of exposing my ignorance, wasn't Mount of the Holy Cross, Colorado, once a National Park?
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Scott Patterson
Scott Patterson

January 16th, 2004, 9:23 pm #7

Holy Cross was a natiional monument, part of the NPS from 1929 to 1950.

On a different note, I read in the paper that a bunch of politicians, judges, and lawers are meeting in a few days to try and get the Grand Staircase Escalante Monument (Utah) abolished. The monument was established in 1996 and is currently the largest national monument in the US outside Alaska.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 10:33 pm

January 21st, 2004, 3:50 pm #8

There have been several national parks which have been downgraded over the years. - John M.

Example:
Ft. Henry National Park, Maryland
Five National Parks have lost their designations: Mackinac in Michigan was transferred to the state and became a state park; Sully's Hill in North Dakota was transfered to the US Fish & Wildlife Service and became a game preserve; Platt in Oklahoma was redesignated Chickasaw National Recreation Area; Abraham Lincoln in Kentucky was downgraded to a National Historical Park; and Fort McHenry in Maryland was downgraded to a National Monument.

A total of 11 national monuments have lost their designations altogether, none since 1956. Colorado's Wheeler and Holy Cross NMs were both abolished in 1950 because of declining visitorship. The NPS could no longer justify keeping rangers and they were transfered to USFS.

(info from Aaron Johnson)

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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 3:15 pm

January 21st, 2004, 10:43 pm #9

Holy Cross was a natiional monument, part of the NPS from 1929 to 1950.

On a different note, I read in the paper that a bunch of politicians, judges, and lawers are meeting in a few days to try and get the Grand Staircase Escalante Monument (Utah) abolished. The monument was established in 1996 and is currently the largest national monument in the US outside Alaska.
I know a few NM that are now extinct; one being Wheeler NM in CO which is now Wheeler Geologic Area.
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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 3:15 pm

January 21st, 2004, 10:48 pm #10

Five National Parks have lost their designations: Mackinac in Michigan was transferred to the state and became a state park; Sully's Hill in North Dakota was transfered to the US Fish & Wildlife Service and became a game preserve; Platt in Oklahoma was redesignated Chickasaw National Recreation Area; Abraham Lincoln in Kentucky was downgraded to a National Historical Park; and Fort McHenry in Maryland was downgraded to a National Monument.

A total of 11 national monuments have lost their designations altogether, none since 1956. Colorado's Wheeler and Holy Cross NMs were both abolished in 1950 because of declining visitorship. The NPS could no longer justify keeping rangers and they were transfered to USFS.

(info from Aaron Johnson)
There was also General Grant NP which was absorbed into Sequoia NP in CA.

Lafayette NP was changed to Acadia NP for those of you who might take my question literally.

There were plans for a Roger Rowlett National Park, but I think those plans are now extinct. He at least deserves national monument recognition, so let the NPS know!

And then there's Fruitjar Birthplace Historic Site....
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