Remapping Topos for Entire World Launches Monday

Remapping Topos for Entire World Launches Monday

roger
roger

January 26th, 2000, 2:50 pm #1

The Space Shuttle Endeavor is scheduled to begin a massive remapping project creating new topos for the entire world starting Monday (Jan. 31).

The collection of the raw data for what is considered most accurate maps in history will only take 80 hours for the entire world using very sophisticated radars.

When you consider that many of the topos we hike with now are 50 years old, that should be pretty nifty.

The New York Times had an extensive article on it on Tuesday (Jan. 25).

You can also read NASA's own press releases at:

http://www.shuttlepresskit.com/STS-99/index.htm
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Kevin Baker
Kevin Baker

January 26th, 2000, 6:36 pm #2

A while back I stumbled across an advertisement on the Web for a 3D topographical map on CD-ROM. I didn't right the address down at the time and was wondering if anyone has the software or has the web address to purchase it. Thanks.
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roger
roger

January 26th, 2000, 10:11 pm #3

The Delorme Topo 2.0 will do this. I have used the program (which for $99 for the whole country seems good) for several of my maps.

Check out:
http://americasroof.com/vt-maps.shtml

Even though Delorme is a sponsor, I am somewhat disappointed in the effort now considering what is available free (and completely accurate). The trail profile and 3D feature are indeed useful. But you can't beat the accuracy of real topo maps that are now free (and more flexible).

http://www.topozone.com

I also bought a Delorme product which will render real USGS topos in 3D. But at $99+ for each state (and then only restricted to the 7.5 flavor) it is a bit pricey.

Adding insult to injury, Delorme's real topos for New York State overlaid Street Atlas streets (DeLorme's Street Atlas is an excellent product)on the topo maps but then didn't label the streets! And that was on 6 CD's!
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Roy Schweiker
Roy Schweiker

February 1st, 2000, 5:28 pm #4

The Space Shuttle Endeavor is scheduled to begin a massive remapping project creating new topos for the entire world starting Monday (Jan. 31).

The collection of the raw data for what is considered most accurate maps in history will only take 80 hours for the entire world using very sophisticated radars.

When you consider that many of the topos we hike with now are 50 years old, that should be pretty nifty.

The New York Times had an extensive article on it on Tuesday (Jan. 25).

You can also read NASA's own press releases at:

http://www.shuttlepresskit.com/STS-99/index.htm
The article I saw said elevations would be accurate to 52 feet. That may be more accurate than present mapping of Antarctica or Tibet but much less than even the 15' quads in the U.S. Sounds like another overhyped NASA project.
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roger
roger

January 23rd, 2002, 5:38 pm #5

The Space Shuttle Endeavor is scheduled to begin a massive remapping project creating new topos for the entire world starting Monday (Jan. 31).

The collection of the raw data for what is considered most accurate maps in history will only take 80 hours for the entire world using very sophisticated radars.

When you consider that many of the topos we hike with now are 50 years old, that should be pretty nifty.

The New York Times had an extensive article on it on Tuesday (Jan. 25).

You can also read NASA's own press releases at:

http://www.shuttlepresskit.com/STS-99/index.htm
The mountains, valleys and cities of California have been revealed in 3D in new NASA images, the latest from a space shuttle project to create the world's most precise topographic map.
We are processing data for the rest of the world on a continent-by-continent basis, mapping and exploring many relatively unknown regions where our maps will be far more precise than the best global maps in use today," he says.
When the world map is completed in autumn 2002, it will cover 80 per cent of Earth's land mass, from Alaska to the southern tip of South America.
Civilians will be able to use versions of the maps to assist in earthquake research, flood control, transportation or urban planning, NASA believes. But only the military will have access to the most detailed data. The US Department of Defense says it will use the maps to improve its missile targeting and troop deployment.
The SRTM was flown aboard the shuttle Endeavour from 11 to 22 February 2000. The 3D measurements of Earth's surface were collected using radar interferometry, which compares two radar images taken from slightly different locations.
http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99991823
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Jeffrey Cook
Jeffrey Cook

January 23rd, 2002, 7:40 pm #6

The Space Shuttle Endeavor is scheduled to begin a massive remapping project creating new topos for the entire world starting Monday (Jan. 31).

The collection of the raw data for what is considered most accurate maps in history will only take 80 hours for the entire world using very sophisticated radars.

When you consider that many of the topos we hike with now are 50 years old, that should be pretty nifty.

The New York Times had an extensive article on it on Tuesday (Jan. 25).

You can also read NASA's own press releases at:

http://www.shuttlepresskit.com/STS-99/index.htm
Topos for countries outside the US will be a welcome change at any level of resolution. However, I have to wonder whether the US versions will be in feet or meters. I vote fo feet, and will hold tight to my current collection of topos should the plan be otherwise.
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Dan
Dan

January 23rd, 2002, 9:13 pm #7

The Delorme Topo 2.0 will do this. I have used the program (which for $99 for the whole country seems good) for several of my maps.

Check out:
http://americasroof.com/vt-maps.shtml

Even though Delorme is a sponsor, I am somewhat disappointed in the effort now considering what is available free (and completely accurate). The trail profile and 3D feature are indeed useful. But you can't beat the accuracy of real topo maps that are now free (and more flexible).

http://www.topozone.com

I also bought a Delorme product which will render real USGS topos in 3D. But at $99+ for each state (and then only restricted to the 7.5 flavor) it is a bit pricey.

Adding insult to injury, Delorme's real topos for New York State overlaid Street Atlas streets (DeLorme's Street Atlas is an excellent product)on the topo maps but then didn't label the streets! And that was on 6 CD's!
I have the national geographic topo program that is $99 per state and awesome! You can view 4 different levels of real topo maps. Draw routes and have it calculate elevation, mileage, etc... for the route. You can search for a place name, use it with a GPS to create waypoints, and other things I haven't had the time to investigate.
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Robert Norheim
Robert Norheim

February 1st, 2002, 12:37 am #8

The mountains, valleys and cities of California have been revealed in 3D in new NASA images, the latest from a space shuttle project to create the world's most precise topographic map.
We are processing data for the rest of the world on a continent-by-continent basis, mapping and exploring many relatively unknown regions where our maps will be far more precise than the best global maps in use today," he says.
When the world map is completed in autumn 2002, it will cover 80 per cent of Earth's land mass, from Alaska to the southern tip of South America.
Civilians will be able to use versions of the maps to assist in earthquake research, flood control, transportation or urban planning, NASA believes. But only the military will have access to the most detailed data. The US Department of Defense says it will use the maps to improve its missile targeting and troop deployment.
The SRTM was flown aboard the shuttle Endeavour from 11 to 22 February 2000. The 3D measurements of Earth's surface were collected using radar interferometry, which compares two radar images taken from slightly different locations.
http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99991823
Roger's weekly digest item that links to this article suggests that the USGS will be releasing new 7.5' topo maps based on the SRTM data.

Not exactly. The USGS will be releasing new digital digital elevation model (DEM) data, which will be useful to those of us with Geographic Information Sytems (GIS) software. Eventually this will make it into end-user products, but not this year. I wouldn't hold my breath waiting for the USGS to release new topo sheets based on this, as it is very expensive to revise all of the other data on 7.5' quads.
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Roy Schweiker
Roy Schweiker

February 6th, 2002, 12:44 am #9

As I said last year about this data, for most of the U.S. it is less accurate than existing elevation data. It is only for places like Alaska and foreign countries that it could improve existing maps.
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Steve Gruhn
Steve Gruhn

February 6th, 2002, 1:16 am #10

Interesting that one of the few domestic places that could use the level of detail provided with this survey technology was largely excluded from the survey. The survey only covered from 54 degrees South to 60 degrees North. The vast majority of Alaska, including Mount McKinley and the highpoints of nine or ten boroughs, is north of 60 degrees North.
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