Rainier GPS route

Rainier GPS route

Joined: November 14th, 2006, 3:15 pm

November 30th, 2006, 11:48 pm #1

Does any one out there have a digital route of the most used approach and climb of Rainier? Is there a official website were I could find the data set. It should be in standard gpx format to be downloaded into my Garmin. I would appreciate the information if it is available.

Steven

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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 6:08 am

December 1st, 2006, 3:47 am #2

There are numerous routes on Rainier, but their exact tracks change not only from year to year, but even from day to day. As it gets warmer and crevasses open up, snowbridges fail, etc. you have to adapt. Rangers and experienced climbers will even warn you against blindly following the boot track, because what may have worked the day before doesn't necessarily work that day.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:07 pm

December 2nd, 2006, 7:41 pm #3

Does any one out there have a digital route of the most used approach and climb of Rainier? Is there a official website were I could find the data set. It should be in standard gpx format to be downloaded into my Garmin. I would appreciate the information if it is available.

Steven
More useful than a GPS route, if you're looking for the best way through the glacier, would just be to take off from Camp Muir a little after the RMI parade, following their headlamps. Their groups start out from Muir every (safe) day sometime between midnight and 2 a.m., and they aren't as slow as i'd expect most big guided groups would be. Playing "follow-the-leader" might not be the most challenging way to climb Rainier, but i think it's a better option for getting through the crevasse fields than following a GPS. If you can't navigate it by sight, the weather's gotta be no good for being up there at all.

An obvious good way to use a GPS would be to record your track on the way from Paradise to Camp Muir, in case of a whiteout on your way back to your car. I think it's not uncommon for people wander off route and even sometimes die, even that close to the lodge.
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Joined: November 14th, 2006, 3:15 pm

December 4th, 2006, 6:19 pm #4

There are numerous routes on Rainier, but their exact tracks change not only from year to year, but even from day to day. As it gets warmer and crevasses open up, snowbridges fail, etc. you have to adapt. Rangers and experienced climbers will even warn you against blindly following the boot track, because what may have worked the day before doesn't necessarily work that day.
Thanks for the heads up. I really didn't plan on following the GPS as a definitive route, just use it as a general heading route. Thought it would be good to have if I got way off trail somehow and needed a quick route back to the main path.
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Joined: November 14th, 2006, 3:15 pm

December 5th, 2006, 12:12 am #5

More useful than a GPS route, if you're looking for the best way through the glacier, would just be to take off from Camp Muir a little after the RMI parade, following their headlamps. Their groups start out from Muir every (safe) day sometime between midnight and 2 a.m., and they aren't as slow as i'd expect most big guided groups would be. Playing "follow-the-leader" might not be the most challenging way to climb Rainier, but i think it's a better option for getting through the crevasse fields than following a GPS. If you can't navigate it by sight, the weather's gotta be no good for being up there at all.

An obvious good way to use a GPS would be to record your track on the way from Paradise to Camp Muir, in case of a whiteout on your way back to your car. I think it's not uncommon for people wander off route and even sometimes die, even that close to the lodge.
As another member pointed out the route would only be as good as the weather conditions, were a crevasse could open up or a snow bridge collapse during ones ascent which would require changes in route on the way back down. I had heard a lot about people getting lost and or killed by falls in white outs and didn’t want to be one of them. I do have a good GPS to use as an aid in route finding. I also wanted the generally accepted route up the mountain loaded in the GPS to help me decide which general direction was correct. It is my understanding that the route is in most places a snow rut and damn near impossible to get lost, but I thought I might be in a short lived white out where a GPS route would be useful, so I was trying to do some advance planning.

I do plan to record the trip up the mountain and use it as a return path on the way back down if needed. I usually don't leave my GPS on during a hike for one good reason which is the GPS usually must be kept near level for it to work with good accuracy and I like to have my hands free, not holding a GPS.

I am working on a shoulder harness where it could ride in the horizontal position which is the best position to track a route as accurately as possible.

The idea of following one of the guide services up the mountain is an excellent idea and I will consider using it.

Thanks
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