Petition Drive to Permit Tramways and Downhill Skiing on Greylock

Petition Drive to Permit Tramways and Downhill Skiing on Greylock

roger
roger

November 7th, 2003, 8:53 pm #1

It's time to repeal prohibitions on skiing, tramway construction and other activities and improvements at the Mount Greylock Reservation and the Greylock Glen, according to the town's Mount Greylock Committee.

Town Moderator Anthony McBride, also a Greylock committee member, told the Selectmen on Wednesday night that repeal legislation is being planned and will be supported by signatures on a petition calling for changes to be made before any development can occur at the state's highest peak.

Petition drive

McBride said yesterday that he has signatures from people in the Boston and Pittsfield areas. He noted that the reservation is a state property and that all residents of the state have a stake in the mountain's future. Petitions will be placed in businesses, McBride said, and the committee is considering a door-to-door drive.

"In order to do anything up there, the law has to be amended," McBride said.

Massachusetts General Law Chapter 676, which was passed in 1985, forbids downhill skiing, the construction of chairlifts, tramways and other projects. The legislation sought by the Greylock committee would insert wording that permits such endeavors.

And McBride said another change is vital. Currently, any proposed changes to the mountain require unanimous approval from the Board of Environmental Management, also known as the Mount Greylock Protective Association. McBride wants that condition changed to a simple majority approval.

http://www.berkshireeagle.com/Stories/0 ... 59,00.html
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roger
roger

November 11th, 2003, 2:58 am #2

The "state-of-the-art" building will host numerous first-floor exhibits, including a display depicting the town's rich industrial past. That exhibit will feature a skyline rendition showing town mills with "windows" displaying historic town photographs.
Promoting attractions
Exhibits also will promote Berkshire attractions, including the Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield and Hancock Shaker Village. The center will host a small performance space and a rentable room for community events.
A replica of the Mount Greylock War Memorial is in place at the center and will be outfitted with "stations" with DVD screens and information about museums, events, history and recreation throughout the Berkshires.
The center's second floor has nine offices, a kitchenette, and a work area for bureau staff.
Hogan is leaving the state agency to accept private sector employment. While heading MassDevelopment, he secured $2.3 million for the center project as well as a $1 million bridge loan for the Jones Block rehabilitation project, which will allow development of the Adams Center for Environmental Excellence.

The "state-of-the-art" building will host numerous first-floor exhibits, including a display depicting the town's rich industrial past. That exhibit will feature a skyline rendition showing town mills with "windows" displaying historic town photographs.
Promoting attractions
Exhibits also will promote Berkshire attractions, including the Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield and Hancock Shaker Village. The center will host a small performance space and a rentable room for community events.
A replica of the Mount Greylock War Memorial is in place at the center and will be outfitted with "stations" with DVD screens and information about museums, events, history and recreation throughout the Berkshires.
The center's second floor has nine offices, a kitchenette, and a work area for bureau staff.
Hogan is leaving the state agency to accept private sector employment. While heading MassDevelopment, he secured $2.3 million for the center project as well as a $1 million bridge loan for the Jones Block rehabilitation project, which will allow development of the Adams Center for Environmental Excellence.
http://www.berkshireeagle.com/Stories/0 ... 07,00.html

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jn
jn

November 11th, 2003, 10:55 pm #3

It's time to repeal prohibitions on skiing, tramway construction and other activities and improvements at the Mount Greylock Reservation and the Greylock Glen, according to the town's Mount Greylock Committee.

Town Moderator Anthony McBride, also a Greylock committee member, told the Selectmen on Wednesday night that repeal legislation is being planned and will be supported by signatures on a petition calling for changes to be made before any development can occur at the state's highest peak.

Petition drive

McBride said yesterday that he has signatures from people in the Boston and Pittsfield areas. He noted that the reservation is a state property and that all residents of the state have a stake in the mountain's future. Petitions will be placed in businesses, McBride said, and the committee is considering a door-to-door drive.

"In order to do anything up there, the law has to be amended," McBride said.

Massachusetts General Law Chapter 676, which was passed in 1985, forbids downhill skiing, the construction of chairlifts, tramways and other projects. The legislation sought by the Greylock committee would insert wording that permits such endeavors.

And McBride said another change is vital. Currently, any proposed changes to the mountain require unanimous approval from the Board of Environmental Management, also known as the Mount Greylock Protective Association. McBride wants that condition changed to a simple majority approval.

http://www.berkshireeagle.com/Stories/0 ... 59,00.html
I just hiked it again today. Today's hike makes 40 months in a row (not including all the rest before). I talked to two hikers before the snow set in and they told me they are worried about the mountain on the East side. I am too. Some of the deer hunters were not too happy too. I will post more when there is time but I will tell you that this is a High Point in danger of being lost in terms half of it's wilderness sense. It is a classic example of Business for some v/s conservation for others...and we are not talking about the summit.
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roger
roger

November 14th, 2003, 3:21 am #4

It's time to repeal prohibitions on skiing, tramway construction and other activities and improvements at the Mount Greylock Reservation and the Greylock Glen, according to the town's Mount Greylock Committee.

Town Moderator Anthony McBride, also a Greylock committee member, told the Selectmen on Wednesday night that repeal legislation is being planned and will be supported by signatures on a petition calling for changes to be made before any development can occur at the state's highest peak.

Petition drive

McBride said yesterday that he has signatures from people in the Boston and Pittsfield areas. He noted that the reservation is a state property and that all residents of the state have a stake in the mountain's future. Petitions will be placed in businesses, McBride said, and the committee is considering a door-to-door drive.

"In order to do anything up there, the law has to be amended," McBride said.

Massachusetts General Law Chapter 676, which was passed in 1985, forbids downhill skiing, the construction of chairlifts, tramways and other projects. The legislation sought by the Greylock committee would insert wording that permits such endeavors.

And McBride said another change is vital. Currently, any proposed changes to the mountain require unanimous approval from the Board of Environmental Management, also known as the Mount Greylock Protective Association. McBride wants that condition changed to a simple majority approval.

http://www.berkshireeagle.com/Stories/0 ... 59,00.html
Tilting at windmills again on Greylock
By Glenn Drohan - November, 12 2003

You’ve got to admire the persistence of Tony McBride, the local undertaker who quipped some 40 years ago that the obituary had not yet been written for a tramway on Mount Greylock. McBride now seems to have re-ignited the Greylock Glen Now committee in Adams — a group of local cheerleaders who unsuccessfully exhorted the Michael Dukakis administration and later the William Weld administration to finish what they had set out to do at the Greylock Glen — that is, develop the thing, for goodness sake! Never mind that 1,200 condominiums or 850 single-family homes and a golf course would have eaten up much of the public land and been an eyesore and a playground for the rich just below the state’s highest peak.


Tilting at windmills again on Greylock
By Glenn Drohan - November, 12 2003

You’ve got to admire the persistence of Tony McBride, the local undertaker who quipped some 40 years ago that the obituary had not yet been written for a tramway on Mount Greylock. McBride now seems to have re-ignited the Greylock Glen Now committee in Adams — a group of local cheerleaders who unsuccessfully exhorted the Michael Dukakis administration and later the William Weld administration to finish what they had set out to do at the Greylock Glen — that is, develop the thing, for goodness sake! Never mind that 1,200 condominiums or 850 single-family homes and a golf course would have eaten up much of the public land and been an eyesore and a playground for the rich just below the state’s highest peak.


Over the past two years, those townspeople who still want a glen development have waited patiently as the Massachusetts Development Finance Agency has tried to hammer out a new plan — so far one that calls for a very modest proposal for an environmental center and recreational trails.

That patience has evidently worn thin, as McBride and his newly charged group are now calling for the state to repeal the state legislation that has protected the 12,000-acre Mount Greylock Reservation from downhill skiing, tramways and chair lifts. McBride also wants the state to allow a hotel and a restaurant on the reservation (although both already exist at the Bascom Lodge).

Trouble is, Mount Greylock is a statewide icon and a rallying point for every environmental group in existence. Greylock Glen Now should leave the mountain and the reservation alone and stick to the glen itself. State Rep. Daniel E. Bosley, D-North Adams, kindly suggested as much when he advised the town to try to get the glen land back from the state — which, after all, essentially stole it while whispering sweet promises, all of which have been broken. If McBride thinks environmentalists have been tough on the glen, wait until he sees the tiger that leaps to the defense of the reservation.
The group is Greylock Glen Now, not Greylock Reservation Now. It should stop tilting at windmills, climb down from its soapbox mountain and pursue a dream within its means.
http://www.iberkshires.com/story.php?story_id=12614
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 31st, 2004, 2:43 am #5

It's time to repeal prohibitions on skiing, tramway construction and other activities and improvements at the Mount Greylock Reservation and the Greylock Glen, according to the town's Mount Greylock Committee.

Town Moderator Anthony McBride, also a Greylock committee member, told the Selectmen on Wednesday night that repeal legislation is being planned and will be supported by signatures on a petition calling for changes to be made before any development can occur at the state's highest peak.

Petition drive

McBride said yesterday that he has signatures from people in the Boston and Pittsfield areas. He noted that the reservation is a state property and that all residents of the state have a stake in the mountain's future. Petitions will be placed in businesses, McBride said, and the committee is considering a door-to-door drive.

"In order to do anything up there, the law has to be amended," McBride said.

Massachusetts General Law Chapter 676, which was passed in 1985, forbids downhill skiing, the construction of chairlifts, tramways and other projects. The legislation sought by the Greylock committee would insert wording that permits such endeavors.

And McBride said another change is vital. Currently, any proposed changes to the mountain require unanimous approval from the Board of Environmental Management, also known as the Mount Greylock Protective Association. McBride wants that condition changed to a simple majority approval.

http://www.berkshireeagle.com/Stories/0 ... 59,00.html
BOSTON -- The Romney administration yesterday unveiled a new blueprint for development at the Greylock Glen in Adams that includes a recreational complex with nature trails and mountain biking, but strictly limits high-density construction on the property.
The 32-page revised master plan for the 1,063-acre site at the base of Mount Greylock is dramatically scaled down from previous development schemes, which at times envisioned ambitious hotels, a golf course, a tramway and dozens of second homes.
Only a modest amount of man-made structures are proposed, including an environmental center, mountain lodges, rustic cabins and campsites, with a goal of attracting outdoor enthusiasts, students and families, and corporate retreats.
"Guests could attend meetings, swim, hike, bike, cross-country ski,andenrichthemselves through environmental education opportunities, all in a lush valley of rolling land below the eastern slope of majestic Mount Greylock," states the new plan, drafted by the state Department of Conservation and Recreation.
While prohibiting such uses of the site as golf courses, alpine skiing, residential housing, all-terrain vehicle trails and large-scale commercial development, the master plan states that all development must be created with an emphasis on sustainability.
Felix Browne, a spokesman for the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, said the improvements envisioned for the Greylock Glen are to "provide viable recreational opportunities with a minimal environmental impact."
"There is a strong economic development aspect to the master plan, but the development is focused more toward the visitors' center and environmental education center in Adams. The general theme is that of directing the development away from the glen," Browne said. "Obviously, there is a very strong preservation component to what we have proposed at the glen itself."
The Massachusetts Development Finance Agency will continue to oversee economic developmentprojectsindowntown Adams.
Gov. Mitt Romney, who is the fifth governor to weigh in on the plans for the Greylock Glen site, inherited a controversial project that environmental advocates fought for decades.
http://www.berkshireeagle.com/Stories/0 ... 13,00.html
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 5th, 2004, 3:24 pm #6

A poll on Berkshire Chamber of Commerce site asks for your opinions on what to do with Greylock Glen (the email I got was in favor of #4)

What should happen with the Greylock Glen in Adams?
1. The town should take the land back from the state.
2. A golf course is the best option.
3. The town would most benefit from a hotel and casino.
4. For now, at least cut the grass!

http://www.berkshirechamber.com/
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 2nd, 2004, 2:45 am #7

It's time to repeal prohibitions on skiing, tramway construction and other activities and improvements at the Mount Greylock Reservation and the Greylock Glen, according to the town's Mount Greylock Committee.

Town Moderator Anthony McBride, also a Greylock committee member, told the Selectmen on Wednesday night that repeal legislation is being planned and will be supported by signatures on a petition calling for changes to be made before any development can occur at the state's highest peak.

Petition drive

McBride said yesterday that he has signatures from people in the Boston and Pittsfield areas. He noted that the reservation is a state property and that all residents of the state have a stake in the mountain's future. Petitions will be placed in businesses, McBride said, and the committee is considering a door-to-door drive.

"In order to do anything up there, the law has to be amended," McBride said.

Massachusetts General Law Chapter 676, which was passed in 1985, forbids downhill skiing, the construction of chairlifts, tramways and other projects. The legislation sought by the Greylock committee would insert wording that permits such endeavors.

And McBride said another change is vital. Currently, any proposed changes to the mountain require unanimous approval from the Board of Environmental Management, also known as the Mount Greylock Protective Association. McBride wants that condition changed to a simple majority approval.

http://www.berkshireeagle.com/Stories/0 ... 59,00.html
The state has released its final master plan for Greylock Glen, incorporating a number of revisions proposed by environmentalist groups, such as limiting the amount of indoor space allowed, and promising long-term wildlife protections and a prohibition against a golf course.
But the revisions do not fundamentally alter the plan, which divides the 1,063-acre site at the foot of Mount Greylock into three zones with varying degrees of protection. It includes a low-impact, passive recreation-conservation area, active recreation areas and a 53-acre development area for lodging and meeting space.
The final plan incorporates three key elements proposed by several environmental organizations, including the Environmen-tal League of Massachusetts, the BerkshireNaturalResources Council, the Massachusetts Audubon Society and the Massachusetts Public Interest Research Group.
Habitat protections
The first includes establishing long-term protections of open space and wildlife habitats. This would be done "either through a conservation restriction (limiting uses to passive recreation) or by outright transfer to the Mount Greylock State Reservation, [and] will be worked out with the successful project proponent."
Environmentalists had also been concerned about limiting the allowable number of lodging units, roads, parking lots, buildings and restroom facilities. The state chose to include language that would restrict such development to 75,000 square feet of enclosed interior space. This would amount to less than two acres within the designated 53-acre development area.
Also, the final plan settles another concern of environmentalists by permanently prohibiting a golf course.
The plan also includes a number of other changes. It adds language that clearly states "all development must not adversely impact vistas to the town and from the summit of Mount Greylock." It also clearly restates an existing provision in the law that prohibits development of an aerial tramway to the summit of Mount Greylock.
http://www.berkshireeagle.com/Stories/0 ... 43,00.html
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