Owners of Ben Nevis Upset With Peakbagging Challenges

Owners of Ben Nevis Upset With Peakbagging Challenges

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June 12th, 2002, 8:32 pm #1

WALKERS attempting a challenge to conquer the highest peaks in Scotland, England and Wales within 24 hours are damaging the environment, groups responsible for their management have claimed.

Thousands of people each summer battle against the clock to try to scale Ben Nevis, Scafell Pike and Snowdon in what has become known as the Three Peaks Challenge.

But increasing numbers have led to a host of problems, including erosion on the mountains, litter and noise pollution for local residents.

Will Boyd-Wallis, of the John Muir Trust, which purchased the summit of Ben Nevis less than two years ago, said: "Visitors to the Ben Nevis area are always welcome and very important to the local economy. However, large scale three peaks events contribute little except disruption and damage."

The National Trust, which own Scafell Pike and parts of Snowdon, asked walkers to think twice before they attempt the challenge.
http://www.scotlandonsunday.com/uk.cfm?id=628052002
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June 17th, 2002, 1:14 pm #2

Five men are attempting a world record this weekend by climbing five peaks in Britain and Ireland in less than 24 hours
The group will be led by wealthy property developer Brian Scowcroft, 46, from the Lake District, who is using his personal helicopter to ferry the climbers between mountains.

They start their climb at 4am on Sunday with Carrantuohill, 1,041m (3,415ft), in the Republic of Ireland, followed by Slieve Donard in Northern Ireland, which stands at 852m (2,795ft).

The team then fly at 130mph across the Irish Sea to Wales to climb Snowdon, 1,085m (3,560ft), fly north to conquer Scafell Pike 978m (3,210ft) in Cumbria and complete their challenge with the 1,344m (4,409ft) Ben Nevis in Scotland.

The climbers hope to complete their challenge which has been officially accepted by Guinness World Records just before 3.30am on Monday.

If successful, the climbers will have raised £100,000 for the Kingmoor Park Properties Charitable Trust, a charity named after a development site Mr Scowcroft owns in Carlisle.

http://www.utvinternet.com/news_disp/in ... 0&r=3&pt=n



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June 18th, 2002, 1:38 pm #3

An attempt to set a 'new world record' by ascending the five highest peaks in the UK and Eire has been postponed due to low cloud, but is apparently set to be re-scheduled for Wednesday.
http://www.outdoorsmagic.com/news/article.asp?UAN=1469

Website:
http://www.kingmooraviation.co.uk/

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 17th, 2004, 9:05 pm #4

WALKERS attempting a challenge to conquer the highest peaks in Scotland, England and Wales within 24 hours are damaging the environment, groups responsible for their management have claimed.

Thousands of people each summer battle against the clock to try to scale Ben Nevis, Scafell Pike and Snowdon in what has become known as the Three Peaks Challenge.

But increasing numbers have led to a host of problems, including erosion on the mountains, litter and noise pollution for local residents.

Will Boyd-Wallis, of the John Muir Trust, which purchased the summit of Ben Nevis less than two years ago, said: "Visitors to the Ben Nevis area are always welcome and very important to the local economy. However, large scale three peaks events contribute little except disruption and damage."

The National Trust, which own Scafell Pike and parts of Snowdon, asked walkers to think twice before they attempt the challenge.
http://www.scotlandonsunday.com/uk.cfm?id=628052002
National parks authorities are clamping down on a race which has become so popular it is causing problems on Wales' highest mountain.
Every year thousands of the fittest hill walkers arrive at the foot of Snowdon as part of the Three Peaks Challenge, where they have 24 hours to climb the tallest spots in Wales, England and Scotland.
But it attracts so many contestants to north Wales, Scafell Pike in the Lake District and Ben Nevis in the Cairngorms that new rules have been drawn up.
It asks that the number of participants is limited, that vehicles are parked away from gateways and participants urged not to arrive, start or finish between midnight and 0500 GMT.
Contestants pack themselves on to the mountains, often at night, to complete the 500-mile route within 24 hours.
Park managers and local people living near Scafell say they have no facilities to handle the thousands of walkers who arrive en masse.
Last year 29,000 took part in the Three Peaks Challenge in June.
Guy Newbold, who runs a tourist website in the Lake District , said: "We can have 600 or 700 people turn up in the middle of the night.
"There's a problem with litter, and people are often tired after driving from Scotland or Wales, which poses a safety risk."
The Three Peaks website also offers advice to those hoping to compete in the challenge,
It states that the National Three Peaks Challenge has put a great amount of pressure on landscape and paths, car parks and services, local communities and even mountain rescue teams.
It advises challengers to ensure that they have a good standard of fitness and use equipment and clothing for mountain conditions, and have a good general understanding of mountain navigation.
The National Trust has also warned about the amount of pollution, litter and erosion caused by too many people.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/wales/3496077.stm

THree Peaks Challenge Page:
http://users.tinyonline.co.uk/richieev/tp/
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