New Granite Peak Guide/Map

New Granite Peak Guide/Map

Joined: July 20th, 2006, 2:30 pm

August 10th, 2006, 9:21 pm #1

Hello All,

I just wanted to let everyone know about a new definitive guide and 1:24,000 scale topo map to Granite Peak, MT. It is published through First Ascent Press, a small (one person - me) publisher in Bozeman. It includes the entire East and West Rosebud approaches, all the logistical details complete with color photos and route lines. The map sheet is 25.2" x 39.2" and folded to 4" x 8" on waterproof, tearproof synthetic paper. You can find more about it and even purchase it at my web site: www.firstascentpress.com.

An interesting story is perhaps the first person to actually use the new map on Granite was Bruce York from Seattle WA. He just climbed the peak on Wednesday the 9th and it was his final state high point to boot! Congratulations. His partner, Whit Magro, happens to be a friend and knowing they were headed to Granite early on Tuesday the 8th I was able to drop the map off at Whit's house in Bozeman late Monday night immediately after picking them up at the printer in Great Falls - hot off the press.

Granite Peak is the first in a series of these maps we are creating. The Gannett Peak map is in production as we speak but unfortunately won't be ready for this season. We are spending considerable time generating the maps and field checking the details for accuracy and thus the Gannett map/guide will be ready this early fall to give everyone plenty of time to dream over it for next summer. Other western states are also under development and we'll be rolling them out as quickly as we can. I'll keep you all posted.

And (in case you are reading this) a personal note to the few people that called me directly this month looking for some Granite Peak info. Sorry I didn't get back to you before your trip(s). I have been swamped getting the map out and I hope your trips were successful. I've created a forum page specific for Granite Peak conditions on my First Ascent Press web site and in the future will be posting any local updates and conditions there.

Thanks for the reading and your interest.
Regards,
Joe Josepshon

--
First Ascent Press
(406) 582-7908
ww.firstascentpress.com
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Joined: August 14th, 2006, 11:36 pm

August 14th, 2006, 11:46 pm #2

I did use the map and after having scoured the web and the 3 books on highpoints it is clearly the best info available on Granite. I have the map on my desk at work now and people are very impressed with it. Whit Magro is a guide based in Bozeman who works for Jackson Hole Mountain Guides and gave me a super trip up Granite for my 50th on August 9. We did a surgical mission in 2 days, day one to the lower climbers camp on FTD and on day two, 4.5 hours to the top by 8:20 am and back to the cars by 6pm. Unless you are an accomplished rock climber, employing a guide like Whit makes the trip easy as there was no time wasted on route selection or dead-ends. There was no snow on the snow bridge, just dirt.
Bruce York
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Joined: September 16th, 2004, 9:30 pm

August 21st, 2006, 3:39 pm #3

Hello All,

I just wanted to let everyone know about a new definitive guide and 1:24,000 scale topo map to Granite Peak, MT. It is published through First Ascent Press, a small (one person - me) publisher in Bozeman. It includes the entire East and West Rosebud approaches, all the logistical details complete with color photos and route lines. The map sheet is 25.2" x 39.2" and folded to 4" x 8" on waterproof, tearproof synthetic paper. You can find more about it and even purchase it at my web site: www.firstascentpress.com.

An interesting story is perhaps the first person to actually use the new map on Granite was Bruce York from Seattle WA. He just climbed the peak on Wednesday the 9th and it was his final state high point to boot! Congratulations. His partner, Whit Magro, happens to be a friend and knowing they were headed to Granite early on Tuesday the 8th I was able to drop the map off at Whit's house in Bozeman late Monday night immediately after picking them up at the printer in Great Falls - hot off the press.

Granite Peak is the first in a series of these maps we are creating. The Gannett Peak map is in production as we speak but unfortunately won't be ready for this season. We are spending considerable time generating the maps and field checking the details for accuracy and thus the Gannett map/guide will be ready this early fall to give everyone plenty of time to dream over it for next summer. Other western states are also under development and we'll be rolling them out as quickly as we can. I'll keep you all posted.

And (in case you are reading this) a personal note to the few people that called me directly this month looking for some Granite Peak info. Sorry I didn't get back to you before your trip(s). I have been swamped getting the map out and I hope your trips were successful. I've created a forum page specific for Granite Peak conditions on my First Ascent Press web site and in the future will be posting any local updates and conditions there.

Thanks for the reading and your interest.
Regards,
Joe Josepshon

--
First Ascent Press
(406) 582-7908
ww.firstascentpress.com
I haven't seen your new Granite guide, but does it tell the story of the aircraft tire at Avalanche Lake? I was just up there, and there is an old aircraft tire on the south side of the Avalanche Lake route. Someone has incorporated it into a cairn these days. Was there a plane crash up there once upon a time? I didn't see any other plane parts but clearly no one packed in an airplane tire.
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Joined: January 24th, 2004, 8:34 pm

August 26th, 2006, 3:19 pm #4

There are a lot of random aircraft parts scattered about the mountains. I once found a 3 foot piece of plane with some wire pullies hanging off it on Mt. Massive in Colorado. It looked like a wing flap off a big plane. Maybe somebody with aviation experience can shed some light on this. Do planes tend to lose parts without actually falling out of the air?
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:11 pm

August 28th, 2006, 7:10 pm #5

Yes, planes can often lose parts in midair, due to extreme turbulence, overstressing the airframe, other pilot error, part failure, or poor maintenance. The aircraft often can still keep flying, and even land safely (or at least make a survivable crash). Since planes may have redundant or complementary systems on either side of the aircraft (ailerons, flaps, elevators, etc.), loss of one may not NECESSARILY result in an unflyable condition, especially if the pilot recognizes the condition and compensates for the slower reaction time, adverse yaw input or other reactions of the aircraft. Loss of a rudder may have far more significant effects, however, since there is usually only one of these. Even this can be managed to some degree, especially in a twin-engine craft, but it's a LOT tougher.

Unfortunately, one of the main reasons that you see airplane parts in the mountains is that planes tend to encounter the worst weather in these regions, and flying into a vicious, unseen thunderstorm can often cause the airframe to come apart, with the updrafts and turbulence spreading the parts over many miles from the primary site. That may be why you may find only one part of an aircraft. In addition, during accident investigations, it is much easier to spot and collect aircraft parts in a prairie field, for example, than in the Rockies or the Sierra, or heavily forested areas.

All pilots know (or should know) to avoid cumulo-granite clouds (clouds with rocks in them!).
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:10 pm

August 28th, 2006, 7:21 pm #6

All pilots know (or should know) to avoid cumulo-granite clouds (clouds with rocks in them!).

This last line is a good one!

I have come across a number of wrecks in the mountains, too... Other than obvious crash sites, I never gave it much thought. In the Whites of Eastern AZ my wife and I came across an intact wing from a plane of c.1940s vintage, but nothing else. We just assumed they carried out what they could and left some stuff behind. Maybe the rest was buried or overgrown. That was about the extent of thought we gave it. Thanks for your insights (and the laugh).
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Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:48 am

August 29th, 2006, 1:31 am #7

There are a lot of random aircraft parts scattered about the mountains. I once found a 3 foot piece of plane with some wire pullies hanging off it on Mt. Massive in Colorado. It looked like a wing flap off a big plane. Maybe somebody with aviation experience can shed some light on this. Do planes tend to lose parts without actually falling out of the air?
A few years ago I saw part of the rudder from an F-4 at the Cosby Knob shelter. One crashed into Cosby Knob back in the early 80's. The park has wreckage all over, see Dwight Mccarters book "Mayday Maydey"

I think the mountains (all over) are littered with wrecks There are some at Mt Mitchell, Grandfather and near Roanoke where Audie Murpheys plane crashed.
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Joined: August 30th, 2006, 6:58 pm

August 30th, 2006, 7:02 pm #8

I did use the map and after having scoured the web and the 3 books on highpoints it is clearly the best info available on Granite. I have the map on my desk at work now and people are very impressed with it. Whit Magro is a guide based in Bozeman who works for Jackson Hole Mountain Guides and gave me a super trip up Granite for my 50th on August 9. We did a surgical mission in 2 days, day one to the lower climbers camp on FTD and on day two, 4.5 hours to the top by 8:20 am and back to the cars by 6pm. Unless you are an accomplished rock climber, employing a guide like Whit makes the trip easy as there was no time wasted on route selection or dead-ends. There was no snow on the snow bridge, just dirt.
Bruce York
I agree with you regarding using a guide on Granite especially if not real knowledgeable about
Rock climbing. Whit was also our guide on Granite. We climbed August 14th thru the 17th. Had a fantastic trip! Whit was great!
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Joined: November 25th, 2000, 10:31 pm

October 5th, 2006, 12:28 am #9

There are a lot of random aircraft parts scattered about the mountains. I once found a 3 foot piece of plane with some wire pullies hanging off it on Mt. Massive in Colorado. It looked like a wing flap off a big plane. Maybe somebody with aviation experience can shed some light on this. Do planes tend to lose parts without actually falling out of the air?
While climbing W. Spanish Peak from the saddle between it and E. Sp. (which I also climbed), I saw what looked like a small plane wreck down a very steep ravine. Don't know anything about it.

I also found a nameplate off a plane while hiking on Boulder Open Space near the large water tank atop a hill N. of Valmont Road, and just off the E. Boulder Trail. Labeled BAE, it came from an aileron assembly from an Airbus airliner. No other parts or wreckage were around; it had a serial number but didn't say which kind of Airbus it came from (like Boeings, they come in many different sizes). Enquiries to everybody from the FAA to the company yielded little or no information. Looks as if it just came off in flight but fortunately the aileron (which controls roll of the aircraft) didn't. Several US airlines use Airbuses.
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Joined: January 26th, 2004, 5:02 pm

October 5th, 2006, 4:27 pm #10

I haven't seen your new Granite guide, but does it tell the story of the aircraft tire at Avalanche Lake? I was just up there, and there is an old aircraft tire on the south side of the Avalanche Lake route. Someone has incorporated it into a cairn these days. Was there a plane crash up there once upon a time? I didn't see any other plane parts but clearly no one packed in an airplane tire.
I saw a wreck near the Boy Scout High Adventure Camp Philmont. Someone had spread yellow paint over much of it. I suspect that the paint was to ensure that in the future, while looking for a new wreck, that this old wreck wasn't mistaken for it.

As for the tire, do they carry tires on the back like a Jeep?

Seriously, I suppose that this was not just a tire, but a rim and maybe some more parts as well?
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