Mount Mansfield, Vermont (4,393 feet)

Mount Mansfield, Vermont (4,393 feet)

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 26th, 2002, 5:37 pm #1

Post your trip reports about Vermont's highest point.

Read about the summit:
http://americasroof.com/nv.shtml
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 14th, 2002, 4:57 am #2

Last edited by dipper on March 15th, 2004, 10:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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alan
alan

August 28th, 2002, 5:37 am #3

Post your trip reports about Vermont's highest point.

Read about the summit:
http://americasroof.com/nv.shtml
http://www.mtritter.org/jar_rwb.html#VT
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Mohamed Ellozy
Mohamed Ellozy

November 14th, 2002, 11:49 pm #4

Post your trip reports about Vermont's highest point.

Read about the summit:
http://americasroof.com/nv.shtml
Finally wrote up my Mount Mansfield in Winter trip report!
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patrick craft
patrick craft

May 14th, 2003, 3:13 pm #5

Post your trip reports about Vermont's highest point.

Read about the summit:
http://americasroof.com/nv.shtml
I was up in Stowe on a business trip and decided to attempt Mansfield. I live in the south but do a fair amount of winter hiking and camping. As part of my conference I purchased a 3 day ski pass for Stowe. I rode the Quad up to the Octogon where I left my ski equipment. I snowshoed up the toll road to the ridge line. The tollroad was well pack but the ridgeline had deep snow. Once out of the trees the snow was fairly consolidated, very icy. I forgot my crampons but my snowshoes had built in claws. I made the top under completely clear weather. Outstanding hike.
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Mohamed Ellozy
Mohamed Ellozy

June 22nd, 2003, 11:51 am #6

Post your trip reports about Vermont's highest point.

Read about the summit:
http://americasroof.com/nv.shtml
I returned to Mount Mansfield to visit Adam's Apple (highpoint of Lamoille County) and decided to explore the scenic Sunset Ridge Trail. It is a great trail when the weather is good!

At the end of the trip report I wrote a short section comparing the major hiking trails up that mountain, I hope it helps some of you in choosing which way to go.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 7:34 pm

March 15th, 2004, 10:00 pm #7

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Joined: January 23rd, 2004, 1:24 am

March 29th, 2004, 10:29 pm #8

Post your trip reports about Vermont's highest point.

Read about the summit:
http://americasroof.com/nv.shtml
I climbed Mt Mansfield on March 29. I wanted to get some miles in, so I decided to do the Sunset Ridge trail from Underhill State Park on the west side. The road into Underhill is not plowed in winter, so I had to park in a small parking area about a mile from where the hike usually begins. The weather was perfect, it got up to about 50 and there was very little wind, even at the summit.
After that first mile to reach the gates, it was another mile to where the trail leaves the CCC road, and .1 mile to where the Laura Cowles trail split off to the right. The snow was in good shape as long as you didn't step off the middle of the trail that had been compressed by hikers and snowshoers. If you did, you postholed to the crotch. After .6 miles there is a short trail that goes to Cantilever Rock, a narrow hunk of cliff about 30 feet long by 2-3 feet wide that has gotten wedged so that it sticks out perpendicular to the cliffs. From there, it is 1.6 miles to the summit. After about 1/2 mile I broke out of the trees, and the rest of the hike was above treeline. There were some snow fields and icy patches, but most of the rock was bare and dry.
I reached the summit at 1:15, 3 3/4 hours after I started. I could see the tip of Mt Marcy across Lake Champlain in New York, Mt Washington in New Hampshire, into Quebec, and a heck of a lot of Vermont. Quite a few people at the top; all but 1 had either taken the gondola up the ski hill or hiked the Long Trail from the east.
After 1/2 hour, I headed back down, at first the same way, then decided to shave .6 miles off by taking the Laura Cowles trail, which pretty much drops straight down the drainage. By this time the snow had softened a lot so that I was postholing even in the trail, and once I stepped off it and went thru up to my armpits. If there hadn't been a 'Thank God' tree handy, I'd probably still be there. I decided it would be quicker and easier to glisade when I could, so I slid down several hundred yards all together, using my walking stick to maintain an illusion of control. The walk back down the park road was slushy, and I reached my truck 6 1/4 hours after I left it. The total distance was about 8.8 miles.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 22nd, 2004, 2:51 pm #9

Post your trip reports about Vermont's highest point.

Read about the summit:
http://americasroof.com/nv.shtml
http://appalachia.outdoors.org/bbs/mess ... eadid=5664
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:07 pm

July 29th, 2004, 5:27 am #10

Post your trip reports about Vermont's highest point.

Read about the summit:
http://americasroof.com/nv.shtml
We summitted these 2 last week, for my 23rd and 24th HPs. The Adirondacks were beautiful, but i'm not sure how whole-heartedly i'd recommend our route, unless you like walking on wet boulders with a full pack. We started at Adirondack Loj on Tuesday afternoon, hiking the standard trail to Marcy Dam. From there we took the trail south through Avalanche Pass and along Avalanche Lake. This is a tough trail. Don't let the flat appearance on the topo map fool you...it's constant ups and downs, with very unsteady footing. The lake was beautiful, and the views of the slides on Mt. Colden were amazing, but very hard-earned. Our campsite was a marked area between Avalanche Lake and Lake Colden. From there we set up camp and made it about halfway up the trail to summit of Algonquin Peak, before deciding that coming down in the dark wasn't something we had the will to do that evening...so we just hung out for awhile on a nice ledge and then headed back to camp.

We had a large visitor that night. He knocked over the dishes i stacked on top of the bear canister, wrestled with it for awhile (managing to pull out some plastic that was barely sticking out, and leaving the can covered in bear slobber) and then started lumbering towards our tent. Melanie had a whistle with her, and i may have awakened the whole county blowing it, but at that point i didn't care. I did not like the idea of that bear just a few feet away from us. The whistle made the bear lumber off, and that was that. It started getting light out a few minutes later, just past 4 a.m.

On Wednesday, we took the trail along the southeast edge of Lake Colden, starting with fog rising over it, and ending with a clear, still reflection of Mt. Colden. From there it was a long, heavy push along the cascading Opalescent River, and the final incline to the top of Marcy. I got rather tired of being passed up by people with no packs on! We reached the top and of course all the struggling was forgotten. We had clear skies and views as far as Mansfield to the east. From the summit we continued north on the Phelps trail, picking our way down boulder after boulder (the ADK's remind me of Baxter State Park), and finally getting rained on as we arrived at our camp for the night at Slant Rock. There were many many people camped there.

Thursday was the hike out...Mel fell in a brook and wrecked her camera...Bushnell Falls was quite a scramble but worth it.

But, the real highlight of the week was Mt. Mansfield on Friday. What great trails we took. We parked at Underhill State Park on the west side of the mountain, and took the Maple Ridge "trail" up. It was a blast, especially with no pack. It's sort of a borderline scramble trail/route, with a few hands and feet climbs up granite slabs, but always with good hand and foot holds readily apparent. There is a rather scary jump of about 4 feet over a 10-foot deep crevice lined with rock. There were great views back to the Adirondacks along the route up. The Maple Ridge meets up with the Long Trail at the Forehead, south of the summit. The cloud level was just below that point, ending the views. The walk along the ridge on the Long Trail had a much higher feel than 4000 feet. Walking in the clouds with the alpine tundra growth... We had the summit to ourselves, and came down via the Sunset Ridge Trail, another spectacular but less technical route. I did manage to wipe out on some rocks though...ugh. Nothing but bruises fortunately. The round trip took about 7 hours, including a long summit break.

Thanks for the help Mark S and Mohamed!

Next up is Mt. Hood this week...wish me luck!

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