memorails in the mountains

memorails in the mountains

Joined: January 21st, 2004, 3:15 pm

March 7th, 2010, 5:32 pm #1

Today's paper in Denver has a short article about all the memorials that people place in the mountains on Forest Service land, off the beaten track. These memorials are typically framed photos and they honor deceased loved ones, dead celebrities, Sept 11, etc. Some memorials more elaborate, with plastic flowers, license plates, and cabinets.

David Wood has found 51 of them and created a new book "Sanctuaries in the Snow" which gives descriptions of each but only vague directions. aspenshrines@aol.com
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Joined: August 2nd, 2001, 8:13 pm

March 7th, 2010, 8:46 pm #2

To quote Hrvoje ("Harv") Galic, "There is a lonely grave in the Sierra. It is in a high valley, rarely visited, and far away from popular hiking trails. The few climbers who reach that place on their way to Banner Peak or Mount Ritter usually just pass by, hurrying towards the glacier that will lead them to their destination. Many don't realize that midway up the valley, and within steps of a perennial spring, there is a stone cairn with a bronze plaque, a forgotten memorial to two climbers who died on Banner Peak in the summer of 1934, more than seventy years ago."

I spotted the Rettenbachers' gravesite on my 1997 attempt to go around the west side and up my eponymous peak. I was contacted several years later by Harv, asking whether I knew any more about the Rettenbachers or history of the gravesite. I didn't but was happy to share several of my photos with him to use in his web report. Harv did an incredible amount of digging and finally came up with the true origins of the story, the tragic climb and how the Rettenbachers' grave was marked.

If you're ever up at Thousand Island Lake in the eastern Sierra, it is worth walking up into the valley toward North Glacier Pass to visit the site and pay your respects. As I've noted in email conversations over the years, it's not a bad spot to spend all of eternity.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 5:18 am

March 8th, 2010, 2:04 pm #3

Today's paper in Denver has a short article about all the memorials that people place in the mountains on Forest Service land, off the beaten track. These memorials are typically framed photos and they honor deceased loved ones, dead celebrities, Sept 11, etc. Some memorials more elaborate, with plastic flowers, license plates, and cabinets.

David Wood has found 51 of them and created a new book "Sanctuaries in the Snow" which gives descriptions of each but only vague directions. aspenshrines@aol.com
Here's a thread on this same subject from a few years ago on a Northeast hiking BB (viewsfromthetop.com) that was stimulated by a memorial plaque appearing on Mount Clay, NH. Good discussion ... I had a comment on page 4 under one of my screen names (Puma) ...

http://www.viewsfromthetop.com/forums/s ... als&page=4
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Joined: August 10th, 2009, 8:53 pm

March 9th, 2010, 8:33 pm #4

To quote Hrvoje ("Harv") Galic, "There is a lonely grave in the Sierra. It is in a high valley, rarely visited, and far away from popular hiking trails. The few climbers who reach that place on their way to Banner Peak or Mount Ritter usually just pass by, hurrying towards the glacier that will lead them to their destination. Many don't realize that midway up the valley, and within steps of a perennial spring, there is a stone cairn with a bronze plaque, a forgotten memorial to two climbers who died on Banner Peak in the summer of 1934, more than seventy years ago."

I spotted the Rettenbachers' gravesite on my 1997 attempt to go around the west side and up my eponymous peak. I was contacted several years later by Harv, asking whether I knew any more about the Rettenbachers or history of the gravesite. I didn't but was happy to share several of my photos with him to use in his web report. Harv did an incredible amount of digging and finally came up with the true origins of the story, the tragic climb and how the Rettenbachers' grave was marked.

If you're ever up at Thousand Island Lake in the eastern Sierra, it is worth walking up into the valley toward North Glacier Pass to visit the site and pay your respects. As I've noted in email conversations over the years, it's not a bad spot to spend all of eternity.
Wish I'd know this sooner. I was just out there last summer. The Ansel Adams Wilderness is spectacularly beautiful.

Here's the stunning view of the Ritter Range from Mt Lyell.

From left to right: Mt Davis / Banner Peak / Mt Ritter / Mt Rodgers (front & center) / Electra Peak






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Joined: August 10th, 2009, 8:53 pm

March 9th, 2010, 8:44 pm #5

Today's paper in Denver has a short article about all the memorials that people place in the mountains on Forest Service land, off the beaten track. These memorials are typically framed photos and they honor deceased loved ones, dead celebrities, Sept 11, etc. Some memorials more elaborate, with plastic flowers, license plates, and cabinets.

David Wood has found 51 of them and created a new book "Sanctuaries in the Snow" which gives descriptions of each but only vague directions. aspenshrines@aol.com
There's a metal plaque near the base of Gannett Peak in memory of someone. It's on a granite wall near the start of the boulderfield at an elevation of 11K or so. It's pretty much in the middle of no where. It can be seen when approaching from Floyd Wilson Meadows. I have a picture of it somewhere.
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