Krakauer/Anker Remeasurement of Vinson (10 Feet Higher) Topic of Feb NOVA Show

Krakauer/Anker Remeasurement of Vinson (10 Feet Higher) Topic of Feb NOVA Show

roger
roger

January 30th, 2003, 3:31 pm #1

In January 2001 an eight-person NOVA team stood atop the highest peak in Antarctica, Mt. Vinson, having arrived by a difficult, unexplored route. Among them were author and climber Jon Krakauer and acclaimed mountaineer Conrad Anker.

To scale the peak, the team battled 60-mile-an-hour winds and temperatures as low as 35 degrees below zero. "Mountain of Ice," airing Tuesday, February 11 at 8 PM ET on PBS, chronicles their daunting journey as well as their efforts both to measure the rate of snow accumulation in Antarctica's highest mountains and to take the first high-precision GPS reading from Vinson's summit. (Their measurement came in at 16,067 feet, ten feet higher than previously measured.)

More:
URL Wire.Com

PBS's Nova Vinson Web Site

John Krakauer Books

Conrad Anker Books
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Roger Williams
Roger Williams

January 30th, 2003, 6:35 pm #2

Vinson used to be 5140 m. (16 868.52'). Bukit Kinabalu, HP of Borneo, Sabah and Malaysia, which I climbed in 72, has also lost altitude; it used to be 4101 m. (13 455') but I think it's claimed to be lower now. On the other hand, Everest has gained 2 m., to 8850 (29 035').
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Harry
Harry

January 31st, 2003, 3:50 pm #3

In January 2001 an eight-person NOVA team stood atop the highest peak in Antarctica, Mt. Vinson, having arrived by a difficult, unexplored route. Among them were author and climber Jon Krakauer and acclaimed mountaineer Conrad Anker.

To scale the peak, the team battled 60-mile-an-hour winds and temperatures as low as 35 degrees below zero. "Mountain of Ice," airing Tuesday, February 11 at 8 PM ET on PBS, chronicles their daunting journey as well as their efforts both to measure the rate of snow accumulation in Antarctica's highest mountains and to take the first high-precision GPS reading from Vinson's summit. (Their measurement came in at 16,067 feet, ten feet higher than previously measured.)

More:
URL Wire.Com

PBS's Nova Vinson Web Site

John Krakauer Books

Conrad Anker Books
Hi there,

I would love to see this PBS show, is there any Samaritan out there that can tape this and send me a VHS?
I am perfectly fine with NTSC tapes, but cannot get PBS over here (Amsterdam).

Ofcourse I will repay the favour by sending some lame Dutch show on PAL VHS back... Or if you prefer, maybe some nice Amazon book?

Thanks,
Best regards,

Harry
http://www.7summits.com
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-adam
-adam

January 31st, 2003, 5:44 pm #4

You can order it online:
http://main.wgbh.org/wgbh/shop/products/wg36753.html

(not available until March)

-adam
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roger
roger

January 31st, 2003, 8:29 pm #5

In January 2001 an eight-person NOVA team stood atop the highest peak in Antarctica, Mt. Vinson, having arrived by a difficult, unexplored route. Among them were author and climber Jon Krakauer and acclaimed mountaineer Conrad Anker.

To scale the peak, the team battled 60-mile-an-hour winds and temperatures as low as 35 degrees below zero. "Mountain of Ice," airing Tuesday, February 11 at 8 PM ET on PBS, chronicles their daunting journey as well as their efforts both to measure the rate of snow accumulation in Antarctica's highest mountains and to take the first high-precision GPS reading from Vinson's summit. (Their measurement came in at 16,067 feet, ten feet higher than previously measured.)

More:
URL Wire.Com

PBS's Nova Vinson Web Site

John Krakauer Books

Conrad Anker Books
Robert Anderson, who has made solo ascents of Vinson Massif before, will attempted new routes in the Vinson area, and on the Massif itself, this in December 2002, in the company of climbers Chris Heintz, Peggy Foster, Bob Guthrie and Intesar Haider.
Moving onto Vinson, they established a high camp at about 10,000 feet and scout out a route on the broad expanse of the South Face.
The expedition has been organized through Jagged Globe in the UK, flying with Adventure Network to Antarctica. The team is carrying The Explorers Club Flag #103.
Maps, Pictures and Reports on Mountain Zone
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roger
roger

February 11th, 2003, 2:47 pm #6

In January 2001 an eight-person NOVA team stood atop the highest peak in Antarctica, Mt. Vinson, having arrived by a difficult, unexplored route. Among them were author and climber Jon Krakauer and acclaimed mountaineer Conrad Anker.

To scale the peak, the team battled 60-mile-an-hour winds and temperatures as low as 35 degrees below zero. "Mountain of Ice," airing Tuesday, February 11 at 8 PM ET on PBS, chronicles their daunting journey as well as their efforts both to measure the rate of snow accumulation in Antarctica's highest mountains and to take the first high-precision GPS reading from Vinson's summit. (Their measurement came in at 16,067 feet, ten feet higher than previously measured.)

More:
URL Wire.Com

PBS's Nova Vinson Web Site

John Krakauer Books

Conrad Anker Books
Here's an excellent Boston Globe article on the producer of tonight's Nova show on Vinson.
--------

Liesl Clark was a high school cheerleader and a sports fashion model. But she's not exactly a girlie girl. Clark, 36, has climbed the highest point in Antarctica, scaled parts of Everest five times,
You won't find her on a runway in Victoria's Secret; rather, she's in fleece or spandex, on a mountain bike or fly-fishing. Clark would much rather talk about her 17-day, 45-mile climb up the east face of Vinson Massif, an unmapped route in Antarctica that no human had ever taken. ''It's mind-boggling to know that every step you're taking is a step into the unknown,'' says Clark. The conditions were among the harshest on earth: The crew battled winds of 60 miles an hour and tem-
You won't find her on a runway in Victoria's Secret; rather, she's in fleece or spandex, on a mountain bike or fly-fishing. Clark would much rather talk about her 17-day, 45-mile climb up the east face of Vinson Massif, an unmapped route in Antarctica that no human had ever taken. ''It's mind-boggling to know that every step you're taking is a step into the unknown,'' says Clark. The conditions were among the harshest on earth: The crew battled winds of 60 miles an hour and tem-
Behind the scenes was Clark and her two-person Nova crew that lugged a 42-pound high-definition camera. All together, the team carried more than 1,200 pounds of food, fuel, and equipment on sleds and in backpacks.
Clark discovered what she thought were her limits in Antarctica. It was summit day, and the crew was at 12,000 feet. She awoke with a splitting headache and nausea, classic symptoms of altitude mountain sickness. She knew she should not go on, but the leaders pushed her to try.
It was a 19-hour day, with dry heaving all the way. ''It was the worst day I've ever had on a mountain,'' she says. She felt so sick that even when she stood at the summit, ''there wasn't one moment when I said, `I'm glad I did this.' ''
After she returned, Clark came to realize that her real accomplishment was not the peak but the film. ''People don't care if you made a remarkable film,'' she says. ''They want the summit.''
Clark herself had been at the Mount Everest base camp the day of the tragedy. (She has been as high as 24,000 feet but has yet to attempt the 29,000-foot summit.) After launching the Web expedition ''Everest Quest'' for ''Nova'' from there, she returned to her office at WGBH only to learn of the deaths. A year later, she produced ''Everest -- The Death Zone,'' based on her interviews with the IMAX team that recorded the climb that day. In 1999, she went back and made ''Lost on Everest,'' about searching for the bodies of George Mallory and Andrew Irvine, who died in 1924 trying to reach the summit.
Boston Globe - Feb. 11, 2003

Liesl Clark on web.
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roger
roger

February 12th, 2003, 10:17 pm #7

In January 2001 an eight-person NOVA team stood atop the highest peak in Antarctica, Mt. Vinson, having arrived by a difficult, unexplored route. Among them were author and climber Jon Krakauer and acclaimed mountaineer Conrad Anker.

To scale the peak, the team battled 60-mile-an-hour winds and temperatures as low as 35 degrees below zero. "Mountain of Ice," airing Tuesday, February 11 at 8 PM ET on PBS, chronicles their daunting journey as well as their efforts both to measure the rate of snow accumulation in Antarctica's highest mountains and to take the first high-precision GPS reading from Vinson's summit. (Their measurement came in at 16,067 feet, ten feet higher than previously measured.)

More:
URL Wire.Com

PBS's Nova Vinson Web Site

John Krakauer Books

Conrad Anker Books
Here's my mini review, "Wow."

The NOVA show did about everything and capturing the spirit of why we do what we do.

Having the conflicts on how to get the "inexperienced" film crew up the mountain made it very accessible.

Then there was putting it in perspective in relationship to the Scott-Armundsen challenge to reach the South Pole.

And for a techie, I liked the 3D maps.

Two thumbs up!
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Joined: August 2nd, 2001, 8:13 pm

February 13th, 2003, 2:40 am #8

In January 2001 an eight-person NOVA team stood atop the highest peak in Antarctica, Mt. Vinson, having arrived by a difficult, unexplored route. Among them were author and climber Jon Krakauer and acclaimed mountaineer Conrad Anker.

To scale the peak, the team battled 60-mile-an-hour winds and temperatures as low as 35 degrees below zero. "Mountain of Ice," airing Tuesday, February 11 at 8 PM ET on PBS, chronicles their daunting journey as well as their efforts both to measure the rate of snow accumulation in Antarctica's highest mountains and to take the first high-precision GPS reading from Vinson's summit. (Their measurement came in at 16,067 feet, ten feet higher than previously measured.)

More:
URL Wire.Com

PBS's Nova Vinson Web Site

John Krakauer Books

Conrad Anker Books
Like Roger, I was very impressed with the Nova production on the Vinson Massif expedition. Outstanding videography and an excellent view of the team dynamics.

Watching Krakauer and his partner climb up those nearly vertical snow faces on the headwall was chilling, and not because of the cold...your first slip there would be your last...

Way the heck out of my league, but I've done just enough snow climbing to really appreciate the difficulty of what they accomplished, and to lead the neophyte producer and cameraman up to the top, as well, was amazing...
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Andy Martin
Andy Martin

February 13th, 2003, 8:56 pm #9

In January 2001 an eight-person NOVA team stood atop the highest peak in Antarctica, Mt. Vinson, having arrived by a difficult, unexplored route. Among them were author and climber Jon Krakauer and acclaimed mountaineer Conrad Anker.

To scale the peak, the team battled 60-mile-an-hour winds and temperatures as low as 35 degrees below zero. "Mountain of Ice," airing Tuesday, February 11 at 8 PM ET on PBS, chronicles their daunting journey as well as their efforts both to measure the rate of snow accumulation in Antarctica's highest mountains and to take the first high-precision GPS reading from Vinson's summit. (Their measurement came in at 16,067 feet, ten feet higher than previously measured.)

More:
URL Wire.Com

PBS's Nova Vinson Web Site

John Krakauer Books

Conrad Anker Books
I would be very keen to hear from someone who
can provide more details on the GPS hardware
used for this measurement and similar ones
on other high peaks. In particular:

1. Is a separate base station needed ?
2. How long do you have to stay on the summit ?
Believe on Vinson they stayed 20 minutes,
and were pressed for time.
3. What is the accuracy ?
4. How much does entire system cost - hardware
and software ?

If cost was reasonable, and base station not needed,
we could use GPS measurements to solve vexing
questions concerning the true summits of certain
mountain ranges or political areas (like cohps)

Andy Martin oldadit@iname.com

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