Jo and Rob Gambi Become First Husband/Wife 7 Summit Completers

Jo and Rob Gambi Become First Husband/Wife 7 Summit Completers

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 2nd, 2004, 1:57 pm #1

Jo Gambi, a 35-year-old physiotherapist and fitness enthusiast from Penn in Buckinghamshire, and her 46-year-old husband Rob, an Australian fund manager and surfer who has lived and worked in London for the past decade, did not know if they would succeed when they thought they would take a long mid-career break to go climbing and considered the seven summits as a goal.
They were even less sure when their first attempt at high-altitude training in Nepal had to be cut short when Rob suffered an obstructed bowel in the mountains and his life was saved only by an emergency helicopter evacuation.
But after months of recuperation, they started again and reached the top of Denali on June 12 last year.
They reached the top of Kilimanjaro - not fully snow-covered - just over six weeks later on July 30, and then headed for the Antarctic.
Mt Vinson was scaled on December 15, in temperatures of nearly minus 60C degrees.
They crossed to South America and managed to scale Aconcagua, the highest mountain in the world outside Asia, on January 26, which they found the most difficult, when Jo fell ill and nearly gave up.
They reached the top of Mt Kosciusko on March 5, in a single day, before setting their sights on Everest, which they reached on May 24.
When they reached the top of Elbrus on July 20 they set what they believe are various records.
They believe they are the first couple to climb all seven summits together as a married couple, having both reached each summit at precisely the same date and time, and reached the summits of all seven on the first attempt.
They believe they are the fastest couple to complete the seven summits, with the fourth-fastest time in the world overall of one year and 38 days (measured from first to last summit dates), and they also believe Jo Gambi is the fastest woman to complete the feat.
It is likely to be verified by the website 7summits.com, which keeps details of all attempts.
The Gambis believe the whole series of climbs cost them more than £100,000 ($274,490).
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/storydisplay. ... tion=world
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 4th, 2004, 3:26 am #2

Phil and Susan Ershler became the first couple to finish the Seven Summits together when they reached the Summit of Everest on May 16th, 2002. Pretty nice! Doing all the climbs together! A nice picture of them coming down the mountain is above. (Picture source: Eric Simonson). Susan is now an very successful motivational speaker.

So for those that like to split hairs. Gary Pfisterer and Ginette Harrison did finish the Seven Summits back in 1995, but some of their Summits were not together and some were before they were married.

Ginette Harrison, of course, was one of the greatest women climbers ever, and is still the only woman to summit Kangchenjunga. Ginette, never got the big media attention but climbed mountains in small groups of climbers in most cases rather than on commercial expeditions.
http://www.everestnews2004.com/stories2 ... ts2004.htm
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:07 pm

December 3rd, 2004, 8:14 am #3

Jo Gambi, a 35-year-old physiotherapist and fitness enthusiast from Penn in Buckinghamshire, and her 46-year-old husband Rob, an Australian fund manager and surfer who has lived and worked in London for the past decade, did not know if they would succeed when they thought they would take a long mid-career break to go climbing and considered the seven summits as a goal.
They were even less sure when their first attempt at high-altitude training in Nepal had to be cut short when Rob suffered an obstructed bowel in the mountains and his life was saved only by an emergency helicopter evacuation.
But after months of recuperation, they started again and reached the top of Denali on June 12 last year.
They reached the top of Kilimanjaro - not fully snow-covered - just over six weeks later on July 30, and then headed for the Antarctic.
Mt Vinson was scaled on December 15, in temperatures of nearly minus 60C degrees.
They crossed to South America and managed to scale Aconcagua, the highest mountain in the world outside Asia, on January 26, which they found the most difficult, when Jo fell ill and nearly gave up.
They reached the top of Mt Kosciusko on March 5, in a single day, before setting their sights on Everest, which they reached on May 24.
When they reached the top of Elbrus on July 20 they set what they believe are various records.
They believe they are the first couple to climb all seven summits together as a married couple, having both reached each summit at precisely the same date and time, and reached the summits of all seven on the first attempt.
They believe they are the fastest couple to complete the seven summits, with the fourth-fastest time in the world overall of one year and 38 days (measured from first to last summit dates), and they also believe Jo Gambi is the fastest woman to complete the feat.
It is likely to be verified by the website 7summits.com, which keeps details of all attempts.
The Gambis believe the whole series of climbs cost them more than £100,000 ($274,490).
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/storydisplay. ... tion=world
..Joe has admitted to taking steroids, do those climbs still count?!?

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Joined: December 4th, 2004, 4:25 am

December 4th, 2004, 5:40 am #4

Jo Gambi, a 35-year-old physiotherapist and fitness enthusiast from Penn in Buckinghamshire, and her 46-year-old husband Rob, an Australian fund manager and surfer who has lived and worked in London for the past decade, did not know if they would succeed when they thought they would take a long mid-career break to go climbing and considered the seven summits as a goal.
They were even less sure when their first attempt at high-altitude training in Nepal had to be cut short when Rob suffered an obstructed bowel in the mountains and his life was saved only by an emergency helicopter evacuation.
But after months of recuperation, they started again and reached the top of Denali on June 12 last year.
They reached the top of Kilimanjaro - not fully snow-covered - just over six weeks later on July 30, and then headed for the Antarctic.
Mt Vinson was scaled on December 15, in temperatures of nearly minus 60C degrees.
They crossed to South America and managed to scale Aconcagua, the highest mountain in the world outside Asia, on January 26, which they found the most difficult, when Jo fell ill and nearly gave up.
They reached the top of Mt Kosciusko on March 5, in a single day, before setting their sights on Everest, which they reached on May 24.
When they reached the top of Elbrus on July 20 they set what they believe are various records.
They believe they are the first couple to climb all seven summits together as a married couple, having both reached each summit at precisely the same date and time, and reached the summits of all seven on the first attempt.
They believe they are the fastest couple to complete the seven summits, with the fourth-fastest time in the world overall of one year and 38 days (measured from first to last summit dates), and they also believe Jo Gambi is the fastest woman to complete the feat.
It is likely to be verified by the website 7summits.com, which keeps details of all attempts.
The Gambis believe the whole series of climbs cost them more than £100,000 ($274,490).
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/storydisplay. ... tion=world
The Gambi's have had the adventure of a lifetime ... good for them !!! That is why I climb and I don't care how much it costs.

Semper Fi,
Robert William Zerby
E-mail: zerby@walla.com


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