How not to climb Gannett

How not to climb Gannett

Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:07 pm

July 21st, 2005, 1:49 am #1

I'm posting a trip report in the trip reports section...happy SAFE highpointing everyone!
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Joined: January 23rd, 2004, 4:14 pm

July 21st, 2005, 4:33 am #2

Hey Mark,
A tremendously valiant effort!! You guys were sooo close. I'm sure those 6 hours back to camp were intense. Its a long, long way back in there and you guys were probably feeling pretty isolated and vulnerable.

I'm curious how you came into contact with this Serge fellow? I can't believe he left you guys behind and took your water on top of that. That line about it would be safer to unrope was a load of BS. What somehow the crevasses aren't a danger on the return trip??? He just wanted to ditch you guys and needed to be unroped to do it. And then leaving his rope for you guys to carry out. This guy is a class act.

Reminds me of a having a chance to climb Granite Peak a few years ago with a guy I met on top of Borah Peak. He was climbing Granite with some people he met on the internet and invited me to come. There was no way I was going on a peak like Granite with somebody I had never climbed with before. Turns out it was Scott Surgent and company he met up with and they all summitted fine. But I just didn't want to take that chance.

I can relate to the not sleeping thing. I often have difficulty sleeping before a big climb due to nerves and excitement. I've learned to deal with it on shorter climbs, but on a peak as long as Gannett, it is hard to go 2-3 days without much sleep and be strong enough for summit day. I barely made Gannett myself, not sleeping much at all the first 3 days.

About your gear, what kind of layers wear you wearing on summit day and what type of shell pants and jacket did you have?

I'm glad that the scenery allowed you to enjoy your trip as a whole. Titcomb Basin, Island Lake, Sceneca Lake, and the Winds are truely spectacular. Those marmots in Titcomb Basin are vicious, I'm still a little bitter towards them when I see them here in Colorado almost every weekend. Ray must have had fun warding them off.
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Joined: February 9th, 2004, 4:17 am

July 22nd, 2005, 2:54 am #3

serge had been carrying my tent and i was carrying his rope .
because we were sharing a tent and he was always the first one into camp and i was always the last one,so he would put up the tent.
on the way out , i left camp before anyone else and i arrived at the stopping point for the day second ,serge was first ..
he had been talking about giving me back my tent , taking his rope and hiking all the way out that day.. i said fine but no way i could do that..
so i pulled his rope out of my pack and laid it down on the rocks ..
thats when the horse packer showed up and told me the others had hired him to carry out our packs..
so i got the tent from serge loaded it in my pack and gave my pack to the horse packer ..
i was so busy thinking about the steak i was going to eat , i forgot
serges rope on the rock .. if mark had not found it i would have bought
serge a new rope cause i was responsible for it. the left behind rope was my fault.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:07 pm

July 22nd, 2005, 5:09 am #4

Hey Mark,
A tremendously valiant effort!! You guys were sooo close. I'm sure those 6 hours back to camp were intense. Its a long, long way back in there and you guys were probably feeling pretty isolated and vulnerable.

I'm curious how you came into contact with this Serge fellow? I can't believe he left you guys behind and took your water on top of that. That line about it would be safer to unrope was a load of BS. What somehow the crevasses aren't a danger on the return trip??? He just wanted to ditch you guys and needed to be unroped to do it. And then leaving his rope for you guys to carry out. This guy is a class act.

Reminds me of a having a chance to climb Granite Peak a few years ago with a guy I met on top of Borah Peak. He was climbing Granite with some people he met on the internet and invited me to come. There was no way I was going on a peak like Granite with somebody I had never climbed with before. Turns out it was Scott Surgent and company he met up with and they all summitted fine. But I just didn't want to take that chance.

I can relate to the not sleeping thing. I often have difficulty sleeping before a big climb due to nerves and excitement. I've learned to deal with it on shorter climbs, but on a peak as long as Gannett, it is hard to go 2-3 days without much sleep and be strong enough for summit day. I barely made Gannett myself, not sleeping much at all the first 3 days.

About your gear, what kind of layers wear you wearing on summit day and what type of shell pants and jacket did you have?

I'm glad that the scenery allowed you to enjoy your trip as a whole. Titcomb Basin, Island Lake, Sceneca Lake, and the Winds are truely spectacular. Those marmots in Titcomb Basin are vicious, I'm still a little bitter towards them when I see them here in Colorado almost every weekend. Ray must have had fun warding them off.
Hey Rex. My layers on summit day were...wool hat, capilene shirt, light fleece shirt, nylon rain jacket with hood, goretex ski gloves, polypro long johns, goretex rain pants, sock liners, smartwool socks, La Sportiva heavy leather boots. I had a down coat that i started out wearing during breaks, but at the end was wearing under my rain coat. I had heavy fleece layers in my pack that i was determined to keep dry in reserve in case we had to bivy or got stuck or hurt.

Hi Ray...hope you're well!
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Joined: January 23rd, 2004, 4:14 pm

July 22nd, 2005, 7:25 pm #5

Hey Mark,

I'm by no means a gear guru, but I climb 14ers in the winter and know what works well for me. Summit day on Gannett can be pretty similiar to a winter outing here in Colorado. The key is to just be warm enough to where you are not sweating if that can be helped by clothing adjustments. Sweating soaks your clothes from the inside out, and as you experienced, once you stop moving you get cold FAST.
For your pants were they more just thin rainwear proctection, or something similiar to these Outerwear pants
These are the pants I use on winter 14ers and on summit day on Gannett, Hood, etc. I get warm easily, so these pants with just a capilene long underwear layer is usually all I need for my lower body. They breath much better than the "rainwear" type pants and have zippers, etc to adjust your temp. I've used the pants that are more considered rainwear, like these Rainwear pants and find they just don't breath enough in highly aerobic situations.They are just too clammy and designed more for keeping you dry in a downpour. Wearing pants like these I had an experience similar to yours. I was sweating to death on the inside and once I stopped moving my sweat got cold and I was freezing in a instant.

For the top layer, I usually just where a capilene base layer and my fleece or soft shell during the ascent. I often overheat on the ascent and have to unzip my pit zips, and sometimes even the main zipper. Heck, there's been times this winter where I've been climbing a 14er in just my base layer. I have this shell in case it is raining/snowing to keep out moisture. It is considered more outerwear than rainwear. It has pit zips as well to adjust body temp. Once I stop for breaks and usually on the descent I have to add a layer to stay warm.

Besides these, I always have hat, gloves, goggles, face mask, etc. in case it gets really nasty. I pretty make treat Gannett summit day like a winter climb and bring my winter clothing that I can add/remove/adjust to almost any temp. Once I realize I am overheating and sweating, I stop, remove or unzip something until I'm just warm enough to not be sweating.

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