Half of Living 900 Everest Summiters Expected in Nepal 50th Anniversary Celebration

Half of Living 900 Everest Summiters Expected in Nepal 50th Anniversary Celebration

roger
roger

January 16th, 2003, 3:19 pm #1

The Nepalese authorities have announced that Everest climbers from across the world will gather in May to mark the 50th anniversary of the first ascent of the world's highest mountain.
They say they expect nearly half of the 900 people who have climbed Everest and are still living to attend the meeting in the capital, Kathmandu. More than 1,200 people have climbed the world's highest mountain since Hillary and his Sherpa guide, Tenzing Norgay, first scaled the 8,850-metre peak 50 years ago.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/2664323.stm

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roger
roger

January 23rd, 2003, 5:54 pm #2

This year, just in time for the 50th anniversary of Sir Edmund Hillary's first ascent of Everest, climbers on the mountain will have the chance to connect with the world below by e-mail. That is because Tsering Gyaltsen, the grandson of the only surviving Sherpa to have accompanied Hillary on that famed climb, is planning to build the world's highest Internet cafe at base camp.
This year, just in time for the 50th anniversary of Sir Edmund Hillary's first ascent of Everest, climbers on the mountain will have the chance to connect with the world below by e-mail. That is because Tsering Gyaltsen, the grandson of the only surviving Sherpa to have accompanied Hillary on that famed climb, is planning to build the world's highest Internet cafe at base camp.
Jim Forster, an engineer at Cisco, eagerly donated three Wi-Fi radios on behalf of his company. Such radios enable the creation of wireless networks that can relay data within a couple of hundred feet or as far as several miles as the crow flies, much the way that local-area networks, or LAN's, work in offices.

From his base in Colorado Springs, Dave. Hughes, 74, is using a Web-based conferencing system as a long-distance tool to teach Mr. Gyaltsen and his colleagues how to set up the base-camp network. Mr. Gyaltsen is working with technicians on loan from two Internet service providers, Square Networks and Worldlink, based in Nepal's capital, Katmandu. Another friend of Mr. Cook's, Mike Trest, an independent consultant and satellite expert, is helping to teach the Nepalese about satellites.
The network will consist of a small satellite dish, planted about 1,500 feet above base camp, that can provide two-way communications. Because the dish must operate from firm ground, it cannot be used directly at base camp, which is on a moving glacier. The $10,000 satellite dish, which Mr. Gyaltsen purchased with a bank loan and funds from Square Networks, will connect to the cybercafe at base camp over the Wi-Fi radios. The dish will beam data to a satellite in orbit and to an Internet service provider in Israel.

Mr. Gyaltsen and the pollution committee, which will technically own the radios, are still deciding what to charge users. They are considering a flat fee of $2,000 to $5,000 per expedition, which can number 5 to 20 people. That price might sound steep, but Mr. Gyaltsen says it paled in comparison with the cost of the expedition itself, typically $65,000 a person.
The satellite link and Internet service will cost the operators less than $1,000 a month for the climbing season. Any profits will go to the pollution committee.

More: New York Times
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Roger Williams
Roger Williams

January 23rd, 2003, 11:19 pm #3

How will the set & the (expensive!) satellite dish be powered? Solar cells?
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Anonymous
Anonymous

January 30th, 2003, 10:04 pm #4

This year, just in time for the 50th anniversary of Sir Edmund Hillary's first ascent of Everest, climbers on the mountain will have the chance to connect with the world below by e-mail. That is because Tsering Gyaltsen, the grandson of the only surviving Sherpa to have accompanied Hillary on that famed climb, is planning to build the world's highest Internet cafe at base camp.
This year, just in time for the 50th anniversary of Sir Edmund Hillary's first ascent of Everest, climbers on the mountain will have the chance to connect with the world below by e-mail. That is because Tsering Gyaltsen, the grandson of the only surviving Sherpa to have accompanied Hillary on that famed climb, is planning to build the world's highest Internet cafe at base camp.
Jim Forster, an engineer at Cisco, eagerly donated three Wi-Fi radios on behalf of his company. Such radios enable the creation of wireless networks that can relay data within a couple of hundred feet or as far as several miles as the crow flies, much the way that local-area networks, or LAN's, work in offices.

From his base in Colorado Springs, Dave. Hughes, 74, is using a Web-based conferencing system as a long-distance tool to teach Mr. Gyaltsen and his colleagues how to set up the base-camp network. Mr. Gyaltsen is working with technicians on loan from two Internet service providers, Square Networks and Worldlink, based in Nepal's capital, Katmandu. Another friend of Mr. Cook's, Mike Trest, an independent consultant and satellite expert, is helping to teach the Nepalese about satellites.
The network will consist of a small satellite dish, planted about 1,500 feet above base camp, that can provide two-way communications. Because the dish must operate from firm ground, it cannot be used directly at base camp, which is on a moving glacier. The $10,000 satellite dish, which Mr. Gyaltsen purchased with a bank loan and funds from Square Networks, will connect to the cybercafe at base camp over the Wi-Fi radios. The dish will beam data to a satellite in orbit and to an Internet service provider in Israel.

Mr. Gyaltsen and the pollution committee, which will technically own the radios, are still deciding what to charge users. They are considering a flat fee of $2,000 to $5,000 per expedition, which can number 5 to 20 people. That price might sound steep, but Mr. Gyaltsen says it paled in comparison with the cost of the expedition itself, typically $65,000 a person.
The satellite link and Internet service will cost the operators less than $1,000 a month for the climbing season. Any profits will go to the pollution committee.

More: New York Times
This greatly unnatural proposition shows just how severe the encroachment is of this modern society into a remote,difficultly reachable wilderness area.
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roger
roger

April 17th, 2003, 2:07 pm #5

This year, just in time for the 50th anniversary of Sir Edmund Hillary's first ascent of Everest, climbers on the mountain will have the chance to connect with the world below by e-mail. That is because Tsering Gyaltsen, the grandson of the only surviving Sherpa to have accompanied Hillary on that famed climb, is planning to build the world's highest Internet cafe at base camp.
This year, just in time for the 50th anniversary of Sir Edmund Hillary's first ascent of Everest, climbers on the mountain will have the chance to connect with the world below by e-mail. That is because Tsering Gyaltsen, the grandson of the only surviving Sherpa to have accompanied Hillary on that famed climb, is planning to build the world's highest Internet cafe at base camp.
Jim Forster, an engineer at Cisco, eagerly donated three Wi-Fi radios on behalf of his company. Such radios enable the creation of wireless networks that can relay data within a couple of hundred feet or as far as several miles as the crow flies, much the way that local-area networks, or LAN's, work in offices.

From his base in Colorado Springs, Dave. Hughes, 74, is using a Web-based conferencing system as a long-distance tool to teach Mr. Gyaltsen and his colleagues how to set up the base-camp network. Mr. Gyaltsen is working with technicians on loan from two Internet service providers, Square Networks and Worldlink, based in Nepal's capital, Katmandu. Another friend of Mr. Cook's, Mike Trest, an independent consultant and satellite expert, is helping to teach the Nepalese about satellites.
The network will consist of a small satellite dish, planted about 1,500 feet above base camp, that can provide two-way communications. Because the dish must operate from firm ground, it cannot be used directly at base camp, which is on a moving glacier. The $10,000 satellite dish, which Mr. Gyaltsen purchased with a bank loan and funds from Square Networks, will connect to the cybercafe at base camp over the Wi-Fi radios. The dish will beam data to a satellite in orbit and to an Internet service provider in Israel.

Mr. Gyaltsen and the pollution committee, which will technically own the radios, are still deciding what to charge users. They are considering a flat fee of $2,000 to $5,000 per expedition, which can number 5 to 20 people. That price might sound steep, but Mr. Gyaltsen says it paled in comparison with the cost of the expedition itself, typically $65,000 a person.
The satellite link and Internet service will cost the operators less than $1,000 a month for the climbing season. Any profits will go to the pollution committee.

More: New York Times
By using Wi-Fi, parts of Iraq could skip the build-out of traditional phone and cable networks altogether. The situation is similar to how cell phone technology enabled huge swaths of the Third World to avoid regular land-line phone systems. Wi-Fi equipment makers such as Cisco Systems, Proxim and Nomadix are talking to government agencies and non-profits about possibilities for Wi-Fi in Iraq. Humanitarian groups evaluating it include Oxfam International and CARE. Wi-Fi could "lower our overhead and increase our capability to do our jobs," says Bob MacPherson, a director with CARE.
A high-profile role in Iraq would give an added boost to Wi-Fi, already taking off in other parts of the world. Research firm Gartner expects there to be more than 24,000 public Wi-Fi access points worldwide by year's end. An access point is where users can go to get on a network. Starbucks, for example, is installing Wi-Fi networks in many of its stores.
http://www.usatoday.com/money/industrie ... wifi_x.htm
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roger
roger

April 17th, 2003, 2:11 pm #6

This year, just in time for the 50th anniversary of Sir Edmund Hillary's first ascent of Everest, climbers on the mountain will have the chance to connect with the world below by e-mail. That is because Tsering Gyaltsen, the grandson of the only surviving Sherpa to have accompanied Hillary on that famed climb, is planning to build the world's highest Internet cafe at base camp.
This year, just in time for the 50th anniversary of Sir Edmund Hillary's first ascent of Everest, climbers on the mountain will have the chance to connect with the world below by e-mail. That is because Tsering Gyaltsen, the grandson of the only surviving Sherpa to have accompanied Hillary on that famed climb, is planning to build the world's highest Internet cafe at base camp.
Jim Forster, an engineer at Cisco, eagerly donated three Wi-Fi radios on behalf of his company. Such radios enable the creation of wireless networks that can relay data within a couple of hundred feet or as far as several miles as the crow flies, much the way that local-area networks, or LAN's, work in offices.

From his base in Colorado Springs, Dave. Hughes, 74, is using a Web-based conferencing system as a long-distance tool to teach Mr. Gyaltsen and his colleagues how to set up the base-camp network. Mr. Gyaltsen is working with technicians on loan from two Internet service providers, Square Networks and Worldlink, based in Nepal's capital, Katmandu. Another friend of Mr. Cook's, Mike Trest, an independent consultant and satellite expert, is helping to teach the Nepalese about satellites.
The network will consist of a small satellite dish, planted about 1,500 feet above base camp, that can provide two-way communications. Because the dish must operate from firm ground, it cannot be used directly at base camp, which is on a moving glacier. The $10,000 satellite dish, which Mr. Gyaltsen purchased with a bank loan and funds from Square Networks, will connect to the cybercafe at base camp over the Wi-Fi radios. The dish will beam data to a satellite in orbit and to an Internet service provider in Israel.

Mr. Gyaltsen and the pollution committee, which will technically own the radios, are still deciding what to charge users. They are considering a flat fee of $2,000 to $5,000 per expedition, which can number 5 to 20 people. That price might sound steep, but Mr. Gyaltsen says it paled in comparison with the cost of the expedition itself, typically $65,000 a person.
The satellite link and Internet service will cost the operators less than $1,000 a month for the climbing season. Any profits will go to the pollution committee.

More: New York Times
A climbing expedition on Everest will be able to send text messages to report their progress using a temporary wireless network
The last phone-free sanctuary has just been conquered: in a stunt to promote mobile messaging, three companies have joined hands to provide a mobile phone service up the world's highest mountain, Mount Everest.
China Mobile, one of the largest cellular operators in the mainland, has set up a temporary wireless network on the mountain to allow progress of an upcoming expedition to be documented via SMS (Short Messaging Service) and MMS (Multimedia Messaging Service).
Handset maker Motorola will provide its 388C MMS-enabled handset for message transmission while a third partner Sohu.com, a China-based Net firm, will provide content services such as exclusive reporting on its Web site.
Besides seasoned mountaineers, Charles Zhang, president and CEO of Sohu.com, will also participate in the company-sponsored climb in May, Sohu.com said in statement.
"Generally, wireless operating equipment can only work below a height of 4,000 metres. China Mobile is the first carrier to bring wireless applications to a level above 5,100 metres," claimed China mobile spokesman Wang Hongyu.
Future alpinists hoping to tap into the Everest mobile network will be disappointed as this is a temporary publicity stunt and will not be commercially launched.
http://news.zdnet.co.uk/story/0,,t269-s2133617,00.html
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Roger Williams
Roger Williams

April 17th, 2003, 3:50 pm #7

By using Wi-Fi, parts of Iraq could skip the build-out of traditional phone and cable networks altogether. The situation is similar to how cell phone technology enabled huge swaths of the Third World to avoid regular land-line phone systems. Wi-Fi equipment makers such as Cisco Systems, Proxim and Nomadix are talking to government agencies and non-profits about possibilities for Wi-Fi in Iraq. Humanitarian groups evaluating it include Oxfam International and CARE. Wi-Fi could "lower our overhead and increase our capability to do our jobs," says Bob MacPherson, a director with CARE.
A high-profile role in Iraq would give an added boost to Wi-Fi, already taking off in other parts of the world. Research firm Gartner expects there to be more than 24,000 public Wi-Fi access points worldwide by year's end. An access point is where users can go to get on a network. Starbucks, for example, is installing Wi-Fi networks in many of its stores.
http://www.usatoday.com/money/industrie ... wifi_x.htm
What does "Wi-Fi" stand for? All I can think of is Wireless or Wide-Band Fidelity, which doesn't make that much sense.
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Roger Williams
Roger Williams

April 17th, 2003, 3:56 pm #8

A climbing expedition on Everest will be able to send text messages to report their progress using a temporary wireless network
The last phone-free sanctuary has just been conquered: in a stunt to promote mobile messaging, three companies have joined hands to provide a mobile phone service up the world's highest mountain, Mount Everest.
China Mobile, one of the largest cellular operators in the mainland, has set up a temporary wireless network on the mountain to allow progress of an upcoming expedition to be documented via SMS (Short Messaging Service) and MMS (Multimedia Messaging Service).
Handset maker Motorola will provide its 388C MMS-enabled handset for message transmission while a third partner Sohu.com, a China-based Net firm, will provide content services such as exclusive reporting on its Web site.
Besides seasoned mountaineers, Charles Zhang, president and CEO of Sohu.com, will also participate in the company-sponsored climb in May, Sohu.com said in statement.
"Generally, wireless operating equipment can only work below a height of 4,000 metres. China Mobile is the first carrier to bring wireless applications to a level above 5,100 metres," claimed China mobile spokesman Wang Hongyu.
Future alpinists hoping to tap into the Everest mobile network will be disappointed as this is a temporary publicity stunt and will not be commercially launched.
http://news.zdnet.co.uk/story/0,,t269-s2133617,00.html
Shouldn't Wireless Fidelity, or ?ever it stands for, work better at higher altitudes? The higher, the better the chance of line-of-sight to a base station, which should be needed for AOS (Acquisition Of Signal).
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-adam
-adam

April 17th, 2003, 4:23 pm #9

What does "Wi-Fi" stand for? All I can think of is Wireless or Wide-Band Fidelity, which doesn't make that much sense.
http://www.weca.net/OpenSection/why_Wi-Fi.asp?TID=2

As as type this message on a "Wi-Fi" connected laptop. . .

However, this isn't technology I really know much about, so can't say why elevation presents a problem.

-adam
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roger
roger

April 17th, 2003, 5:04 pm #10

What does "Wi-Fi" stand for? All I can think of is Wireless or Wide-Band Fidelity, which doesn't make that much sense.
Wi-Fi is the computer technology du jour and in my opinion is probably overhyped.

If you have a Wi-Fi receiver in your notebook you do not need wires to hook to the Internet as long as you are somewhere that is "broadcasting" the Internet.

Intel recently released its Centrino chip for notebooks that bundles it (you may have seen their ads with somebody using a computer on a diving board). If you have an earlier computer you will need a special card to receive the signal.

In the perfect Wi-Fi world, you will be able to access the Internet at airports, in coffee shops, etc., without having to hook into any wires.

One of the earliest adopters of this technology was Starbucks which broadcasts Wi-Fi at its shops. The only catch is that you have to have an account in order to pick up the signal ($30/month or $6/24 hours). This is over and above your regular Internet connections. Consequently you don't see a lot of folks at Starbucks surfing the net. Here's an article on the woes of this:
http://news.com.com/2100-1039-990487.html

In places like Iraq and Everest which don't have wires to begin with, the process may be the best way to go since they only have to install a series of dishes rather than wiring the entire place. However in wired America it's questionable whether it will take off because the "hot spots" where you can receive a broadcast signal is very tiny and limited. Plus you have to be fairly tech savvy to figure out how to get on.

In the early heady days of wi-fi for NYC tech heads, some folks set up antennas so they broadcast their broadband connections to anybody for free within a block known as "hot spots" (and published the log on codes on the web). This did not sit well with the broadband folks who promptly shut the websites down.

If you're lucky enough to be in a "hot spot" it's pretty cool to have the blazing speeds of broadband without wires. However, the achilles heel of the process is that the "hot spots" are so small (in a best case scenario the hot spot would be about a city block however it is usually ***much*** smaller than that -- e.g., the confines of a coffee shop).

If you subscribed to the service for logging on at Starbucks, that may not be the same service that would be available at airports, etc.
Last edited by dipper on April 17th, 2003, 7:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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