Granite Peak, Montana (12,799 feet)

Granite Peak, Montana (12,799 feet)

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 17th, 2002, 3:33 am #1

Post your comments from your visit to Montana's highest point.
Read about the summit:
http://americasroof.com/mn.shtml
Quote
Like
Share

Anonymous
Anonymous

August 13th, 2002, 3:42 pm #2

Quote
Share

roger
roger

August 14th, 2002, 3:39 am #3

Post your comments from your visit to Montana's highest point.
Read about the summit:
http://americasroof.com/mn.shtml
Alan and Jesse Applebury's Maps, Trip Report and Photos!
http://www.foxhollow.biz/granite/report.htm
Last edited by dipper on March 17th, 2004, 4:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Anonymous
Anonymous

August 14th, 2002, 9:49 pm #4

Last edited by dipper on March 16th, 2004, 1:11 am, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

James Wedekind
James Wedekind

September 3rd, 2002, 2:54 pm #5

Post your comments from your visit to Montana's highest point.
Read about the summit:
http://americasroof.com/mn.shtml
I just returned from a great trip up Granite Peak over the Labor Day weekend, and wanted to share some information that might help others on their trip.
First off, Frozen to Death Plateau is monstrous. There are plenty of campsites spread over the entire plateau and there seems to be water nearly every 0.25 mile. I camped lower down on FTDP because of concerns that there wouldn't be sites further along. The next day as I headed towards the saddle (and summit) I saw 10-20 more sites that had easily accessible water.
Also be aware that the plateau is a giant dogleg left... in case you don't bring a map just keep following the plateau as it heads left and continues toward Tempest Mountain. A GPS receiver is very useful as the plateau does not provide many memorable landmarks (was instrumental when I returned to camp after summitting).
The snow bridge was non-existent, although there was still lots of snow it is easily bypassed on the South side. There is no need for an ice axe.
Route finding is challenging, try to bring a good route description. The keyhole is located w/in 30ft of the summit, and provides a good landmark. As you head up the last section stay to the right of the direct chimney that heads to the keyhole.
The switchbacks that head up from Mystic Lake are well graded and seem to never end, but they were made infinetly more enjoyable by the profusion of huckle and black berries along the trail.
This peak is spectacular! It is rugged and daunting, but provides a route just easy enough that ropes and technical gear are not necessary (this assumes that exposure does not bother you, and you are a safety conscious climber who meticulously checks holds). The day I climbed Granite there were 7 total people on the mountain. I would not want to be on the mountain if there were more people than that. There is a lot of loose rock and much of the route follows a line where you are partially exposed to rock fall.
The alpine scenery and the challenging climbing made this my favorite HP to date.
If you have any additional questions please feel free to email me and I'll respond to the best of my knowledge. weeds19@aol.com

- JW
Quote
Share

T. Brown
T. Brown

September 4th, 2002, 1:31 pm #6

Post your comments from your visit to Montana's highest point.
Read about the summit:
http://americasroof.com/mn.shtml
TRIP REPORT: GRANITE PEAK, MT
August 28, 2002

Three must be the charm! After two failed attempts, I finally stood atop Granite Peak, MT on Wednesday, August 28, 2002 at 2:00pm. In August 2000, we underestimated the heat/distance and ran out of time. In October 2001, we ran into knee deep snow on Froze to Death Plateau (FDP) and gave up. All three attempts were via the Mystic Lake/Phantom Creek Trail/FDP route.

We were all alone on the mountain for our two day climb. In case anyone is interested, here’s how long it takes a 41 year old man to climb Granite Peak, MT (elev. 12,799) in the rain, fog, snow, lighting/thunder, and heat of August.

Tuesday, 8/27

12:20pm, Sprinkling, Left Parking
2:00pm, Raining, Arrived at Mystic Lake
3:08pm, Raining Hard/Foggy, (8,400’)
6:00pm, Raining/Foggy/Cold, Arrived at FDP(10,180’)
8:30pm, Went to Bed, No Rain, No Wind … Perfect Night!

Wednesday, 8/28

7:20am, Beautiful/38 degrees, Left Eastside of FDP
9:59am, Beautiful, Almost at Tempest Mt. (11,700’)
11:00am, Beautiful, Bottom of Cleaver (10,900’)
12:53pm, Beautiful, Arrived at Snow Bridge (11,600’)
2:00pm, Beautiful, Arrived at Summit
2:56pm, Cloudy/Thunder, Top of Cleaver (11, 400’)
3:15pm, Snowing/Lighting/Thunder, Down in Col Between Tempest & Granite
4:00pm, Cloudy/Windy, Heading Across Saddle at Tempest (11,500’)
7:00pm, Cloudy, Packed up Tents (10,180’)
9:45pm, Beautiful/Stars Everywhere!, Arrived at Mystic Lake
11:36pm, Beautiful, Arrived at Parking Lot

My altimeter is probably short 150’… but it’s all relative. Keep in mind, our team was at best in “fair” physical condition. We might have been able to shave off a few hours, but the weather slowed us down at several points. For planning purposes, I think an “average” climber could plan on “one mile an hour plus sleep time” with good weather. All bets are off if the weather turns bad.

After climbing a grand total of approximately 60 miles in 85 combined hours over three years (not to mention the 12,000+ air miles!), here are some tips to crawling up Granite Peak:

1. Go in August, but be prepared for a cold, wet, and hot weather.
2. Bring a water filter/pump it saves on what you have to carry.
3. Bring a very good sleeping bag, you’ll need it at night.
4. This ain’t a one day hike for anyone I know!
5. Ropes are NOT mandatory, but you will get badly hurt if you slip.
6. Cairns have gotten MUCH better in the past 3 years.
7. There is a short cut at the top of Phantom Creek Trail, take it!
8. Make sure your boots/socks are perfect, it is a LONG hike.
9. Cowboy Bar in Fishtale is awesome.
10. If you get hurt or sick, things could turn very ugly very fast.

They were all three excellent climbs, and the summit was certainly worth the effort. Now that I’ve made it to the top Granite Peak, I feel like I’ve graduated from school and it is time to move on to another challenge. I have mixed emotions, but I’ll never forget this very beautiful and demanding summit.

19 down, 31 to go!

T. Brown
Asheville, NC
Quote
Share

Craig Blaney
Craig Blaney

September 12th, 2002, 6:56 pm #7

Congratulations home boy ! Sounds like an excellent climb - great description. See you in the hood.
Craig
Quote
Share

Scott Surgent
Scott Surgent

January 8th, 2003, 6:39 pm #8

I have farmed all my reports to my www.surgent.net domain. The MT report is at:

http://www.surgent.net/highpoints/states/mt.html

Same as the old link, except for some more photos.
Quote
Share

Serge Massad
Serge Massad

July 24th, 2003, 5:40 pm #9

I just returned from a great trip up Granite Peak over the Labor Day weekend, and wanted to share some information that might help others on their trip.
First off, Frozen to Death Plateau is monstrous. There are plenty of campsites spread over the entire plateau and there seems to be water nearly every 0.25 mile. I camped lower down on FTDP because of concerns that there wouldn't be sites further along. The next day as I headed towards the saddle (and summit) I saw 10-20 more sites that had easily accessible water.
Also be aware that the plateau is a giant dogleg left... in case you don't bring a map just keep following the plateau as it heads left and continues toward Tempest Mountain. A GPS receiver is very useful as the plateau does not provide many memorable landmarks (was instrumental when I returned to camp after summitting).
The snow bridge was non-existent, although there was still lots of snow it is easily bypassed on the South side. There is no need for an ice axe.
Route finding is challenging, try to bring a good route description. The keyhole is located w/in 30ft of the summit, and provides a good landmark. As you head up the last section stay to the right of the direct chimney that heads to the keyhole.
The switchbacks that head up from Mystic Lake are well graded and seem to never end, but they were made infinetly more enjoyable by the profusion of huckle and black berries along the trail.
This peak is spectacular! It is rugged and daunting, but provides a route just easy enough that ropes and technical gear are not necessary (this assumes that exposure does not bother you, and you are a safety conscious climber who meticulously checks holds). The day I climbed Granite there were 7 total people on the mountain. I would not want to be on the mountain if there were more people than that. There is a lot of loose rock and much of the route follows a line where you are partially exposed to rock fall.
The alpine scenery and the challenging climbing made this my favorite HP to date.
If you have any additional questions please feel free to email me and I'll respond to the best of my knowledge. weeds19@aol.com

- JW
Hi Jim,

I just came back (unsuccesfully) from Granite and we turned around at Tempest Mountain which is 4 hours shy of the summit.

I was wondering if the proper summit route from Tempest Mountain involves climbing the face of the mountain that is visible to us from Tempest or if there is a more "normal" route from the hidden face (behind) that we don't see from Tempest.

Basically , I was wondering if we would have gone through the col from Tempest/Granite, if we would have seen a more proper route from there.

I am asking you this question because I intend of going back there in mid August 2003 and I would like to be reassured that there is another route beside the 90 degree vertical that we saw from Tempest.

Thank you in advance.

Serge
Quote
Share

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

March 17th, 2004, 4:27 pm #10

Alan and Jesse Applebury's Maps, Trip Report and Photos!
http://www.foxhollow.biz/granite/report.htm
Above links checked
Quote
Like
Share