gps

gps

Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:48 am

March 5th, 2006, 6:23 pm #1

I've looked at doing some highpoints of some downeast NC counties. I'm also going to get a simple GPS.

1. If I go to on-line topo's how do I get the coordinates for a specific point?

2. Any suggestions for a GPS?
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:48 am

March 5th, 2006, 6:29 pm #2

I just noticed that the UTM coordinates are at the top of the topozone map. Duuh Sorry for the question with the obvious answer.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 20th, 2004, 7:34 pm

March 5th, 2006, 11:10 pm #3

I've looked at doing some highpoints of some downeast NC counties. I'm also going to get a simple GPS.

1. If I go to on-line topo's how do I get the coordinates for a specific point?

2. Any suggestions for a GPS?
Which GPS should you buy? A lot like asking which car you should buy

Best bet is to start by browsing the excellent <a href = "http://gpsinformation.net/">gpsinformation.net</a> web site, and begin with their <a href = "http://gpsinformation.us/main/gpshiking.htm">My First GPS for Hiking: What features does it need?</a> article.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: August 2nd, 2001, 8:13 pm

March 6th, 2006, 4:41 am #4

I've looked at doing some highpoints of some downeast NC counties. I'm also going to get a simple GPS.

1. If I go to on-line topo's how do I get the coordinates for a specific point?

2. Any suggestions for a GPS?
I own two radically-different GPS units: An old reliable Garmin GPS II+ that I've owned for years, and a Garmin iQue 3600 Palm PDA/GPS that I have had for about 2 years. The two serve completely different purposes and will serve to illustrate some of the questions you should ask yourself before buying any GPS.

The II+ runs all day on AA alkalines or several days of fairly heavy use on a set of AA lithiums. The iQue won't run an hour in GPS mode on its internal batteries.

The II+ has no maps. The iQue has a full set of US road maps (not topos) with its included software. If you want to find your way along paved and some forest service roads, the iQue will take you there, assuming you've uploaded the detailed maps for the region of interest.

The II+ is JUST a GPS. The iQue is also my Palm PDA with all of the standard PalmOS apps, synched with Outlook on my desktop PC.

I treat the iQue as my car/office unit. It works extremely well for that, especially when I'm driving in an unfamiliar area and want to find specific locations, hotels, restaurants, etc.

The II+ is my "field" unit. I pick UTMs off Topozone and enter them into the II+ for trailheads, trail junctions, summits, lakes, campsites, whatever.

The II+ is reasonably waterproof and will withstand being used in most conditions. The iQue is NOT sealed and NOT useful outside if it's raining.

So, start off by asking several questions:

1. Field or car?
2. What sort of battery life? (The newer units with more mapping capability will eat batteries quicker than simpler units, but many are at least as good as my II+, given advances in low-power IC technology.)
3. What maps, if any? (Street/road versus topo)
4. What level of weather resistance?
5. Battery technology? (built-in rechargables require you to have access to a charger if you use them past one charge of capacity. Units that use commercial AA or AAA batteries will run as long as you carry enough batteries in your pack)

Like most tools, you have a variety of choices. You have to pick the one that best fits your intended application.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:48 am

March 6th, 2006, 8:47 pm #5

Thanks for the information and links to same. I think I'm going to get a fairly inexpensive Garmin or other to use and learn while hiking, backpacking, and highpointing. As I become more familiar I'll adjust. I'm still a map and compass guy but I think GPS will be helpful in certain conditions (like low lying counties with an expansive highpoint, whiteouts) and for fun. In bushwhacking, the built in compass may be a little easier to use than the one strapped around my neck.
Quote
Like
Share