Gannett Peak via Tourist Creek

Gannett Peak via Tourist Creek

Joined: July 26th, 2004, 2:40 am

September 14th, 2008, 5:58 pm #1

Here are some pictures from my trip to Gannett Peak, August 15-20, 2008:

http://picasaweb.google.com/TSL144/GannettPeak2008

I took the Green River/Tourist Creek/West Couloir route recommended by Jack Bennett. This was my eighth attempt (four from this side, four from the other) and first successful ascent. I spent three days hiking in, one day climbing to the top and back, and two days hiking out.

My impression is that this is the easiest route to Gannett Peak, and that the approach has been getting easier in recent years. There is no trail after the first day, but there are more and more trodden paths here and there, some of which lead to easier routes than you might have found on your own. (Going back multiple times also helps, I suppose.)

I was lucky to have sunny skies for six days in a row. It seems like you spend most of your time walking and climbing over rocks and boulders, and rain makes them slippery and potentially dangerous, especially traveling alone, as I was. Hiking poles are very useful.

Packing light is also important when traveling off-trail. On this trip my pack weighed about 25 pounds. I took an ice axe and crampons, but no other climbing equipment. The short section of class 3 or 4 rock climbing needed to reach the summit ridge is not very difficult. You do need to be very careful, of course, and watch out for the weather.

This was my 49th and probably last high point (no plans to try Denali).
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Joined: March 28th, 2005, 10:24 pm

September 18th, 2008, 4:45 am #2

That is quite an accomplishment!!!

I hope to attempt Gannett Peak sometime within the next few years, myself.
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Joined: June 20th, 2004, 7:42 am

October 23rd, 2008, 1:31 am #3

Here are some pictures from my trip to Gannett Peak, August 15-20, 2008:

http://picasaweb.google.com/TSL144/GannettPeak2008

I took the Green River/Tourist Creek/West Couloir route recommended by Jack Bennett. This was my eighth attempt (four from this side, four from the other) and first successful ascent. I spent three days hiking in, one day climbing to the top and back, and two days hiking out.

My impression is that this is the easiest route to Gannett Peak, and that the approach has been getting easier in recent years. There is no trail after the first day, but there are more and more trodden paths here and there, some of which lead to easier routes than you might have found on your own. (Going back multiple times also helps, I suppose.)

I was lucky to have sunny skies for six days in a row. It seems like you spend most of your time walking and climbing over rocks and boulders, and rain makes them slippery and potentially dangerous, especially traveling alone, as I was. Hiking poles are very useful.

Packing light is also important when traveling off-trail. On this trip my pack weighed about 25 pounds. I took an ice axe and crampons, but no other climbing equipment. The short section of class 3 or 4 rock climbing needed to reach the summit ridge is not very difficult. You do need to be very careful, of course, and watch out for the weather.

This was my 49th and probably last high point (no plans to try Denali).
Congratulations on your 8th attempt ! I am impressed ! And thanks for sharing those incredible photos.

Steve
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Joined: October 23rd, 2008, 10:05 pm

October 23rd, 2008, 11:01 pm #4

Here are some pictures from my trip to Gannett Peak, August 15-20, 2008:

http://picasaweb.google.com/TSL144/GannettPeak2008

I took the Green River/Tourist Creek/West Couloir route recommended by Jack Bennett. This was my eighth attempt (four from this side, four from the other) and first successful ascent. I spent three days hiking in, one day climbing to the top and back, and two days hiking out.

My impression is that this is the easiest route to Gannett Peak, and that the approach has been getting easier in recent years. There is no trail after the first day, but there are more and more trodden paths here and there, some of which lead to easier routes than you might have found on your own. (Going back multiple times also helps, I suppose.)

I was lucky to have sunny skies for six days in a row. It seems like you spend most of your time walking and climbing over rocks and boulders, and rain makes them slippery and potentially dangerous, especially traveling alone, as I was. Hiking poles are very useful.

Packing light is also important when traveling off-trail. On this trip my pack weighed about 25 pounds. I took an ice axe and crampons, but no other climbing equipment. The short section of class 3 or 4 rock climbing needed to reach the summit ridge is not very difficult. You do need to be very careful, of course, and watch out for the weather.

This was my 49th and probably last high point (no plans to try Denali).
Reached Gannett's summit on 7-10-07 (used Elkhart Park Trailhead), after failing from the NE and SE in '05 and '06. Joked about going back this year just to try the route you did. Looks like you had a great climb. Thanks for sharing your pictures, and congrats on finally conquering an amazing mountain.
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Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:48 am

October 24th, 2008, 7:50 pm #5

Here are some pictures from my trip to Gannett Peak, August 15-20, 2008:

http://picasaweb.google.com/TSL144/GannettPeak2008

I took the Green River/Tourist Creek/West Couloir route recommended by Jack Bennett. This was my eighth attempt (four from this side, four from the other) and first successful ascent. I spent three days hiking in, one day climbing to the top and back, and two days hiking out.

My impression is that this is the easiest route to Gannett Peak, and that the approach has been getting easier in recent years. There is no trail after the first day, but there are more and more trodden paths here and there, some of which lead to easier routes than you might have found on your own. (Going back multiple times also helps, I suppose.)

I was lucky to have sunny skies for six days in a row. It seems like you spend most of your time walking and climbing over rocks and boulders, and rain makes them slippery and potentially dangerous, especially traveling alone, as I was. Hiking poles are very useful.

Packing light is also important when traveling off-trail. On this trip my pack weighed about 25 pounds. I took an ice axe and crampons, but no other climbing equipment. The short section of class 3 or 4 rock climbing needed to reach the summit ridge is not very difficult. You do need to be very careful, of course, and watch out for the weather.

This was my 49th and probably last high point (no plans to try Denali).
Great pic's This is the route I plan to take in next few years. Congradulations
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Joined: September 6th, 2009, 2:22 pm

July 22nd, 2010, 3:55 pm #6

Here are some pictures from my trip to Gannett Peak, August 15-20, 2008:

http://picasaweb.google.com/TSL144/GannettPeak2008

I took the Green River/Tourist Creek/West Couloir route recommended by Jack Bennett. This was my eighth attempt (four from this side, four from the other) and first successful ascent. I spent three days hiking in, one day climbing to the top and back, and two days hiking out.

My impression is that this is the easiest route to Gannett Peak, and that the approach has been getting easier in recent years. There is no trail after the first day, but there are more and more trodden paths here and there, some of which lead to easier routes than you might have found on your own. (Going back multiple times also helps, I suppose.)

I was lucky to have sunny skies for six days in a row. It seems like you spend most of your time walking and climbing over rocks and boulders, and rain makes them slippery and potentially dangerous, especially traveling alone, as I was. Hiking poles are very useful.

Packing light is also important when traveling off-trail. On this trip my pack weighed about 25 pounds. I took an ice axe and crampons, but no other climbing equipment. The short section of class 3 or 4 rock climbing needed to reach the summit ridge is not very difficult. You do need to be very careful, of course, and watch out for the weather.

This was my 49th and probably last high point (no plans to try Denali).
Your trip report and pictures are excellent. I copied most of your photos and wrote up everything else. I will use them to guide my wife and I to the top of Gannett sometime in August. Looks exciting. Wish us luck!
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Joined: July 26th, 2004, 2:40 am

July 24th, 2010, 2:36 am #7

Hope you have a nice trip! We will look forward to hearing how it goes.
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Joined: September 6th, 2009, 2:22 pm

September 6th, 2010, 3:40 pm #8

Here are some pictures from my trip to Gannett Peak, August 15-20, 2008:

http://picasaweb.google.com/TSL144/GannettPeak2008

I took the Green River/Tourist Creek/West Couloir route recommended by Jack Bennett. This was my eighth attempt (four from this side, four from the other) and first successful ascent. I spent three days hiking in, one day climbing to the top and back, and two days hiking out.

My impression is that this is the easiest route to Gannett Peak, and that the approach has been getting easier in recent years. There is no trail after the first day, but there are more and more trodden paths here and there, some of which lead to easier routes than you might have found on your own. (Going back multiple times also helps, I suppose.)

I was lucky to have sunny skies for six days in a row. It seems like you spend most of your time walking and climbing over rocks and boulders, and rain makes them slippery and potentially dangerous, especially traveling alone, as I was. Hiking poles are very useful.

Packing light is also important when traveling off-trail. On this trip my pack weighed about 25 pounds. I took an ice axe and crampons, but no other climbing equipment. The short section of class 3 or 4 rock climbing needed to reach the summit ridge is not very difficult. You do need to be very careful, of course, and watch out for the weather.

This was my 49th and probably last high point (no plans to try Denali).
On August 27th my wife (Linda) and I successfully summitted Gannett. We decided to do the approach from Pinedale, Bonney Pass, and then summitt via the Gooseneck Pinnacle. For us, this was a very difficult and challenging under taking. Part of me wanted to use Tourist Creek but we chickened out at the last moment. I will always wonder how that would have been. Anyway, this was our 49th and most likely last highpoint. I'm 62 and Linda is 57 years young. Alaska will have to come in another lifetime. Tim, we can't believe that you kept trying this peak all those times again and again. Unbelievable perseverance.
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Joined: August 5th, 2010, 2:49 am

September 8th, 2010, 12:21 am #9

Here are some pictures from my trip to Gannett Peak, August 15-20, 2008:

http://picasaweb.google.com/TSL144/GannettPeak2008

I took the Green River/Tourist Creek/West Couloir route recommended by Jack Bennett. This was my eighth attempt (four from this side, four from the other) and first successful ascent. I spent three days hiking in, one day climbing to the top and back, and two days hiking out.

My impression is that this is the easiest route to Gannett Peak, and that the approach has been getting easier in recent years. There is no trail after the first day, but there are more and more trodden paths here and there, some of which lead to easier routes than you might have found on your own. (Going back multiple times also helps, I suppose.)

I was lucky to have sunny skies for six days in a row. It seems like you spend most of your time walking and climbing over rocks and boulders, and rain makes them slippery and potentially dangerous, especially traveling alone, as I was. Hiking poles are very useful.

Packing light is also important when traveling off-trail. On this trip my pack weighed about 25 pounds. I took an ice axe and crampons, but no other climbing equipment. The short section of class 3 or 4 rock climbing needed to reach the summit ridge is not very difficult. You do need to be very careful, of course, and watch out for the weather.

This was my 49th and probably last high point (no plans to try Denali).
but with the right friend doing it with me that's done it before, I'd be willing to try it at some point. I'm 49 now so I guess I still have it in me!

Man, what an awesome feat, doing it 7X and then finally succeeding on your 8th try.

Marvelous write up and pics.

Steve
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Joined: July 26th, 2004, 2:40 am

September 17th, 2010, 1:01 am #10

Here are some pictures from my trip to Gannett Peak, August 15-20, 2008:

http://picasaweb.google.com/TSL144/GannettPeak2008

I took the Green River/Tourist Creek/West Couloir route recommended by Jack Bennett. This was my eighth attempt (four from this side, four from the other) and first successful ascent. I spent three days hiking in, one day climbing to the top and back, and two days hiking out.

My impression is that this is the easiest route to Gannett Peak, and that the approach has been getting easier in recent years. There is no trail after the first day, but there are more and more trodden paths here and there, some of which lead to easier routes than you might have found on your own. (Going back multiple times also helps, I suppose.)

I was lucky to have sunny skies for six days in a row. It seems like you spend most of your time walking and climbing over rocks and boulders, and rain makes them slippery and potentially dangerous, especially traveling alone, as I was. Hiking poles are very useful.

Packing light is also important when traveling off-trail. On this trip my pack weighed about 25 pounds. I took an ice axe and crampons, but no other climbing equipment. The short section of class 3 or 4 rock climbing needed to reach the summit ridge is not very difficult. You do need to be very careful, of course, and watch out for the weather.

This was my 49th and probably last high point (no plans to try Denali).
Congratulations, Blaine and Linda! And good luck to Steve R.! (Also, thanks to everyone for graciously presenting my large number of failed attempts in a positive light.) Whatever route you take, traveling among the upper reaches of Gannett Peak is genuinely awe-inspiring, a feeling that is probably enhanced by the fact that there is no easy way to get there.
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