Fourth Quarter 2003 Backcountry Rescues/Accidents

Fourth Quarter 2003 Backcountry Rescues/Accidents

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October 7th, 2003, 3:24 pm #1

Third Quarter 200e accidents/rescues:
http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/mes ... 1057241771


Second Quarter 2003 accidents (part 2) are here:
http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/mes ... 1052491086

Second Quarter 2003 accidents (part 1) are here:
http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/mes ... 1049613186

First Quarter 2003 accidents are here:
http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/mes ... 1041521517

Fourth Quarter 2002 accidents are here:
http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/mes ... 1031319614
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October 7th, 2003, 3:25 pm #2

I will post accident/rescue reports here.
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October 7th, 2003, 3:27 pm #3

Searchers rescue hurt hiker, find lost climbers Prev
Weekend incidents occur at Smith Rock, North Sister


Two Eugene men trying to climb North Sister (R) on Saturday ran into bad weather, became lost and later were found by searchers. (Photo by: Barney Lerten)
By Barney Lerten
Bend.com
Sunday, October 5, 2003 Posted: 2:02 PM
Reference Code: AR-11843

October 5 - The first weekend of October was a busy one for Deschutes County Sheriff’s Search and Rescue units, called out to help remove a fallen, injured hiker at Smith Rock State Park Saturday night and find two overdue climbers on the North Sister early Sunday.

Around 7 p.m. Saturday, searchers joined sheriff’s deputies, Redmond Fire paramedics and a state park ranger, dispatched to a report of an injured hiker on the trail below the “student wall” climbing area at Smith Rock State Park, said sheriff’s Deputy Rhett Hemphill.

Responding units located Arlene K. Denniston, 46, of Maple Valley, Wash. Hemphill said she sustained minor injuries when she slipped and fell from a trail below the climbing area.

Denniston was put into a litter and a rope system was rigged up to lift her about 40 feet out of the canyon, the deputy said.
http://bend.com/news/ar_view%5E3Far_id%5E3D11843.htm
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October 7th, 2003, 3:31 pm #4

I will post accident/rescue reports here.
Japanese mountaineer dies in avalanche in Nepal

TOKYO (AP) - A Japanese climber who was attempting to scale a little-known Himalayan peak in Nepal has died in an avalanche, an official of his climbing club said Saturday.

Ayumi Nozawai, 39, had set off Sept. 5 from Katmandu, the capital, with three other Japanese climbers for an ascent of Mount Himlung Himal. On Sept. 20, Nozawai and two of the other climbers left their base camp, about 4,800 meters (15,840 feet) up the side of the mountain, heading for the summit.

But on Thursday, Nozawai was killed when he was buried by an avalanche at about 6,100 meters (20,130 feet), said Hiroshi Iwazaki, an official with the Tokyo-based Barbarian Club, which Nozawai headed as executive director.

http://www.thestar.com.my/news/story.as ... =latest>
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October 7th, 2003, 3:46 pm #5

I will post accident/rescue reports here.
This came in the http://explorersweb.com newsletter.

Unfortunately, this past week was marked by tragedy. Antoine de Choudens, the ‘King of the Three Poles’ and climbing partner Philippe Renard both died in an avalanche. The Frenchman were on a Shisha Pangma expedition and acclimatizing on a nearby peak when the slide struck. Antoine completed the Three Poles and is the only person to have done the Triple Crown going unsupported on both North and South Pole skis, and without using oxygen on Everest. He and Philippe will sorely be missed.
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October 9th, 2003, 1:35 pm #6

I will post accident/rescue reports here.
October 8, 2003 Well-known grizzly researcher Timothy Treadwell and his companion, Amy Huguenard, were killed this week by a bear at their remote camp in Alaska's Katmai National Park, about 300 miles southwest of Anchorage. It was the first bear-related fatality in the park?s history.

Treadwell, 46, was known for his unorthodox practice of sharing close proximity with the giant predators.

Although his Web site warns that "people should remain 100 yards from bears at all times," he regularly disregarded his own advice, and according to officials used poor judgment in choosing a campsite. Quinley said, "If we were recommending a place to camp, that?s not a place that would have been high on our list. It was not a camping area that had particularly good sight lines to see bears coming, or for them to see you, and it was surrounded by bear trails and close to salmon feeding areas."

At a film festival in Telluride, he told reporters, "If I get eaten by bears, don't feel bad for me, because I will be providing nourishment for them."

http://outside.away.com/outside/news/20031008_1.html

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October 9th, 2003, 7:30 pm #7

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) -- The graphic sounds of a deadly bear attack in the Alaska wilderness were captured on tape, revealing a wildlife author's final, frantic screams as he tried to fend off the beast, authorities said Wednesday.

Trooper Chris Hill said the tape suggests a video camera was turned on just before Timothy Treadwell was attacked at his campsite. His girlfriend, Amie Huguenard, was later mauled to death by a bear. The recording is audio only, and the screen is blank for all six minutes.

"They're both screaming, she's telling him to play dead, then it changes to fighting back. He asks her to hit the bear," Hill said. "There's so much noise going on. I don't know what's him and what might be an animal.

"It's pretty disturbing. I keep hearing it in my mind."



http://www.cnn.com/2003/US/West/10/09/b ... index.html
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October 14th, 2003, 2:24 pm #8

October 8, 2003 Well-known grizzly researcher Timothy Treadwell and his companion, Amy Huguenard, were killed this week by a bear at their remote camp in Alaska's Katmai National Park, about 300 miles southwest of Anchorage. It was the first bear-related fatality in the park?s history.

Treadwell, 46, was known for his unorthodox practice of sharing close proximity with the giant predators.

Although his Web site warns that "people should remain 100 yards from bears at all times," he regularly disregarded his own advice, and according to officials used poor judgment in choosing a campsite. Quinley said, "If we were recommending a place to camp, that?s not a place that would have been high on our list. It was not a camping area that had particularly good sight lines to see bears coming, or for them to see you, and it was surrounded by bear trails and close to salmon feeding areas."

At a film festival in Telluride, he told reporters, "If I get eaten by bears, don't feel bad for me, because I will be providing nourishment for them."

http://outside.away.com/outside/news/20031008_1.html

-adam
Katmai National Park & Preserve (AK)
Follow-up on Bear Mauling Deaths

Rangers and officials from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Alaska State Troopers and Alaska Department of Fish and Game returned to the park’s coast last Wednesday afternoon to perform a field necropsy on the two bears that were killed in self defense while rangers and state troopers were recovering the remains of Timothy Treadwell and Amie Hugenard on Monday. Treadwell and Huguenard were mauled and killed sometime between Sunday, October 5th, and the afternoon of Monday, October 6th. The necropsy of the larger bear revealed that its stomach contained human remains and clothing. Rangers believe the bear was feeding on human remains when an air taxi pilot arrived at the campsite on Monday afternoon. The bear was estimated to be about 28 years old and slightly underweight for this time of year, although it’s estimated that he weighed more than 1,000 pounds. The bear had been captured in May, 1990, as part of a large bear study following the Exxon Valdez oil spill. That spring, the bear weighed about 850 pounds and was in average condition. The bear was shot Monday as it came within about ten feet of rangers and troopers. Although this bear had human remains in its stomach, it can not be proved conclusively that this was the bear that killed the campers. The second, smaller bear was found partially buried in a mound and consumed by another bear. While the remains were inconclusive, biologists said its size and behavior lead them to believe the bear was a young male. There was not enough physical evidence to complete a full necropsy, although human remains were not found in its stomach. This bear was shot after it ignored warning yells and a warning shot and continued to approach rangers and troopers who were loading a plane on Monday afternoon. A closure to visitation remains in effect in the area surrounding the campsite. The closure will be lifted in early December when most bears in the area begin to hibernate. Photos of Kaflia Bay and the campsite area can be seen at http://www.nps.gov/akso/Press/press.htm .
[Submitted by Jane Tranel, Public Affairs, Alaska Regional Office]
http://data2.itc.nps.gov/morningreport/ ... F14%2F2003
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October 14th, 2003, 2:26 pm #9

I will post accident/rescue reports here.
Two local residents were plucked to safety by a Parks Canada helicopter after spending a freezing night on Mount Rundle.

Mark Dickinson, 20, and Danielle Geneau, 19, were unharmed after their chilly ordeal. The pair set out to climb Rundle last Wednesday (Oct. 1), but strayed from the main route.

“We branched off at one part because the path went straight up instead of back and forth and all around,” said Geneau. “We hiked to the top and made our way back down, but we couldn’t find the trail we took up. We retraced our footsteps over and over again. We passed the markers over and over again, but everywhere we went turned into a cliff.”

By nightfall, the pair realized they were in trouble and called friends by cellular phone, telling them they would stay put for the night.

“Wisely,” said Tim Auger, public safety warden for Parks Canada. “They didn’t want to be moving around in the dark on the steep terrain there.”

Sleepless night

After a sleepless night at sub-zero temperatures, Dickinson and Geneau tried again to descend the mountain, hampered by steep forests and rocky cliffs.

http://www.banffcragnewspaper.com/story.php?id=76478
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October 14th, 2003, 2:27 pm #10

I will post accident/rescue reports here.
Malmstrom crew rescues stranded hikers
By Tribune Staff
A Malmstrom Air Force Base helicopter crew has rescued two stranded hikers and their dog in the Bitterroot Mountains of western Montana.
A Malmstrom press release described the drama of what Capt. William Sosnowski, the crew co-pilot, described as "by far the hardest rescue we've had in the two-and-a-half years that I've been here."
"It was a total group effort," he added.
Jason Fox, a senior airman home on leave in Montana from the German Air Force base where he is assigned, was hiking Saturday with his friend Jason Allen and Allen's dog.
The hikers became stranded that night when they tried to take a short cut down the mountain. Fox slipped and fell 100 feet and was too injured to hike any further.
After refueling, the helicopter crew returned to the accident site to lift out Roan, Allen and Allen's dog, who had climbed higher up the mountain to be more accessible. Roan held onto the 60-pound dog, which was the helicopter flight's first animal rescue.

The helicopter flight has rescued 352 people in Montana and parts of Wyoming and Idaho since October 1973. Crew members are equipped with a hoist and forest penetrator to extract victims from rugged terrain.
http://www.greatfallstribune.com/news/s ... 11244.html
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