Elevation Gained in a Year

Elevation Gained in a Year

Joined: January 23rd, 2004, 1:04 am

October 5th, 2004, 1:58 am #1

Just curious with all the other lists we tend to keep; does anyone keep a record of the total elevation gained during a given year while highpointing, county highpointing, peakbagging etc. and what are your criteria for keeping track?
As always, Happy Trails and Safe Climbs
Stony
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Joined: July 11th, 2002, 1:13 pm

October 5th, 2004, 3:16 am #2

I keep a record of my hikes but not my elevation gain. Almost too much work and sometimes the maps don't show gain. That would be another intersting factum for my obsessiveness.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 6:42 pm

October 5th, 2004, 3:24 am #3

Just curious with all the other lists we tend to keep; does anyone keep a record of the total elevation gained during a given year while highpointing, county highpointing, peakbagging etc. and what are your criteria for keeping track?
As always, Happy Trails and Safe Climbs
Stony
I don't keep such a list, but I went over the trips I have done so far this year and I'll guess that I have gained about 108,000 feet of elevation on foot, ski, or snowshoe. But I hope to pass the 115,000-foot mark during my upcoming trip to New England.

I'm just estimating based on major terrain features (passes, valleys, peaks, ridges, etc.) from trailhead to destination and 100-foot contours. I don't count elevation gained using motorized vehicles or bicycles.

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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 5:18 am

October 5th, 2004, 10:20 am #4

Just curious with all the other lists we tend to keep; does anyone keep a record of the total elevation gained during a given year while highpointing, county highpointing, peakbagging etc. and what are your criteria for keeping track?
As always, Happy Trails and Safe Climbs
Stony
Over the last couple of years, I've done less hiking and more biking and have seen a big drop in my yearly elevation gain totals. I've never kept track, but it's not too difficult to estimate. The last two to three years, I'd guess no more than 30,000 feet per year. But when I was heavy into hiking from say 1993-1999, it was probably somewhere on average of 100,000 feet per year.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 5:18 am

October 5th, 2004, 2:37 pm #5

I was just looking at Ted "Cave Dog" Keizer's website and saw that he claimed about 55,000 feet elevation gain in setting his Adirondack 46 record a couple of years ago and about 37,000 feet elevation gain in setting his Catskill 3500 record.

This would tend to lead me to scale back my above estimates to probably no more than 60-70,000 feet/year in elevation gain in my better years and 20,000 feet/year over the last few years.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:10 pm

October 5th, 2004, 4:29 pm #6

Just curious with all the other lists we tend to keep; does anyone keep a record of the total elevation gained during a given year while highpointing, county highpointing, peakbagging etc. and what are your criteria for keeping track?
As always, Happy Trails and Safe Climbs
Stony
I keep a spreadsheet of hikes (highpoints, other significant hikes). Turns out I did almost 52K vertically in 2000. Otherwise I've been consistently in the 42K-49K range. In 2002 I had a total of 49,990 vertical feet... If I'd known that I would have found me a small 10' hill to bag!

I hike Camelback and Squaw/Piestewa Peaks in Phoenix all the time, each with about 1,200' of gain, but do not include these in with my spreadsheet. So it's probably safe to assume that in some years I have exceeded 75K - 80K. I hadn't thought about the yearly figures. Good question. No wonder my legs hate me.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:07 pm

October 5th, 2004, 11:49 pm #7

Just curious with all the other lists we tend to keep; does anyone keep a record of the total elevation gained during a given year while highpointing, county highpointing, peakbagging etc. and what are your criteria for keeping track?
As always, Happy Trails and Safe Climbs
Stony
Sorry Stoney, here at highpointers we don't keep track of elevation gain. We keep track of the aggregate elevation gain avoided by use of motorized vehicles in order to reach a point. So far this year, i've avoided 321,923 ft.

By the way, i reached my "baby peak" yesterday! (first peak on the parent peak list) I only had to cross 2 barbed wire fences and bushwhack for a half hour to reach it too. Fine views from atop Puu O' Ehu...Molokai in the distance.
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Joined: June 20th, 2004, 7:42 am

October 8th, 2004, 2:15 am #8

Just curious with all the other lists we tend to keep; does anyone keep a record of the total elevation gained during a given year while highpointing, county highpointing, peakbagging etc. and what are your criteria for keeping track?
As always, Happy Trails and Safe Climbs
Stony
I've been logging my climbs/hikes since May on the Backpacker Magazine website and show 41 ascents of Near Point (the little mountain near Anchorage upon which I live), 3 ascents of Flattop and 3 state highpoints (Borah, Kings and Eagle) for my total.
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Joined: April 3rd, 2004, 4:42 pm

October 12th, 2004, 5:03 am #9

Just curious with all the other lists we tend to keep; does anyone keep a record of the total elevation gained during a given year while highpointing, county highpointing, peakbagging etc. and what are your criteria for keeping track?
As always, Happy Trails and Safe Climbs
Stony
Since I live in Colorado Springs, I have the luxury of climbing numerous 14'ers within a 3 hour drive. I usually keep track of elevation gain, along with mileage, time, and whatever list the peak pertains to. When I lived in KS, I would be lucky to get 10K' vertical in one year. Elevation gain is easy to figure, especially if you are hiking popular mountains with guidebooks that have already figured out the stats for you.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 6:42 pm

October 18th, 2004, 5:52 am #10

I don't keep such a list, but I went over the trips I have done so far this year and I'll guess that I have gained about 108,000 feet of elevation on foot, ski, or snowshoe. But I hope to pass the 115,000-foot mark during my upcoming trip to New England.

I'm just estimating based on major terrain features (passes, valleys, peaks, ridges, etc.) from trailhead to destination and 100-foot contours. I don't count elevation gained using motorized vehicles or bicycles.
Upon returning from New England, I now estimate that my total elevation gain for the year to date is approximately 119,100 feet.

Thanks much to Mohamed Ellozy and Stony Burk for accompanying me to the top of Mount Washington, their state highpoint.

Many thanks, also, to Garret Oswald for accompanying me to the top of Katahdin, his state highpoint.

43 down, 7 to go.
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