Dress Code for Mauna Kea?

Dress Code for Mauna Kea?

Joined: August 2nd, 2001, 8:13 pm

June 11th, 2006, 3:19 pm #1

Nathan and I will be headed out to HI in a couple of weeks and one of our stops will be Hilo, to drive up Mauna Kea. (Already have a 4WD reserved from Harper's)

I'm wondering how much extra gear/clothing to pack for our short jaunt from the observatory parking lot to the actual summit. If I use the rule of thumb of 4 degrees per thousand feet, and it's 85 degrees at Hilo, it could be 50 or so degrees colder at the summit, so down around freezing.

I'm thinking long pants, a fleece and a wind shell, considering we'll be planning on just a quick walk (well, as "quickly" as we can walk at 13k+ having just driven from sea level with zero acclimation), our summit photos and back to the car.

I know that it does occasionally snow up on Mauna Kea...any reason to bring our ice axes and crampons? (Personally, I always thought it would make a great shot to pose in (what looks like) full winter gear with ice axe and crampons on the black sand beach on the Big Island to use as a lead-in shot for the trip report, but if we don't need to pack them, we won't.)

Feedback and current condition information will be most appreciated!
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:07 pm

June 11th, 2006, 10:46 pm #2

I th ink Wunderground gives info for the Mauna Kea Observatory. It's such a short walk from there that you could go in shorts and a tshirt, but i guess for maximum comfort and a little lunch stop at the summit, i would dress like you would for a December football game in St. Louis. Not in a domed stadium. Snow only comes in winter though, sorry.

Don't forget to bring a natural biodegradable offering for the Snow God's shrine up there. She gets jealous and angry easily...
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Joined: June 12th, 2006, 2:05 pm

June 12th, 2006, 2:13 pm #3

Nathan and I will be headed out to HI in a couple of weeks and one of our stops will be Hilo, to drive up Mauna Kea. (Already have a 4WD reserved from Harper's)

I'm wondering how much extra gear/clothing to pack for our short jaunt from the observatory parking lot to the actual summit. If I use the rule of thumb of 4 degrees per thousand feet, and it's 85 degrees at Hilo, it could be 50 or so degrees colder at the summit, so down around freezing.

I'm thinking long pants, a fleece and a wind shell, considering we'll be planning on just a quick walk (well, as "quickly" as we can walk at 13k+ having just driven from sea level with zero acclimation), our summit photos and back to the car.

I know that it does occasionally snow up on Mauna Kea...any reason to bring our ice axes and crampons? (Personally, I always thought it would make a great shot to pose in (what looks like) full winter gear with ice axe and crampons on the black sand beach on the Big Island to use as a lead-in shot for the trip report, but if we don't need to pack them, we won't.)

Feedback and current condition information will be most appreciated!
My husband and I did the short summit "run" in April. I wore zipoff pants and a fleece, while my husband was wearing jeans and a sweatshirt. It was raining on the drive but we got above the rain clouds at around 9,000 feet and the skies were absolutely clear. Temperature wise it was very warm except for the wind, which is why we needed the extra layer.

The path to the summit is well-trodden and when we ascended therew as just a crust of snow. No need for crampons or ice axe.

If pictures of April conditions will help, you can find our pix here at: http://www.parazz.com/albums/ivy/59415

- Ivy
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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 3:15 pm

June 12th, 2006, 7:59 pm #4

Nathan and I will be headed out to HI in a couple of weeks and one of our stops will be Hilo, to drive up Mauna Kea. (Already have a 4WD reserved from Harper's)

I'm wondering how much extra gear/clothing to pack for our short jaunt from the observatory parking lot to the actual summit. If I use the rule of thumb of 4 degrees per thousand feet, and it's 85 degrees at Hilo, it could be 50 or so degrees colder at the summit, so down around freezing.

I'm thinking long pants, a fleece and a wind shell, considering we'll be planning on just a quick walk (well, as "quickly" as we can walk at 13k+ having just driven from sea level with zero acclimation), our summit photos and back to the car.

I know that it does occasionally snow up on Mauna Kea...any reason to bring our ice axes and crampons? (Personally, I always thought it would make a great shot to pose in (what looks like) full winter gear with ice axe and crampons on the black sand beach on the Big Island to use as a lead-in shot for the trip report, but if we don't need to pack them, we won't.)

Feedback and current condition information will be most appreciated!
Have Nathan wear that sash with all his merit badges. That ought to keep him warm! I've seen a photo of that and it is impressive! Well done, N!
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:10 pm

June 12th, 2006, 8:10 pm #5

Nathan and I will be headed out to HI in a couple of weeks and one of our stops will be Hilo, to drive up Mauna Kea. (Already have a 4WD reserved from Harper's)

I'm wondering how much extra gear/clothing to pack for our short jaunt from the observatory parking lot to the actual summit. If I use the rule of thumb of 4 degrees per thousand feet, and it's 85 degrees at Hilo, it could be 50 or so degrees colder at the summit, so down around freezing.

I'm thinking long pants, a fleece and a wind shell, considering we'll be planning on just a quick walk (well, as "quickly" as we can walk at 13k+ having just driven from sea level with zero acclimation), our summit photos and back to the car.

I know that it does occasionally snow up on Mauna Kea...any reason to bring our ice axes and crampons? (Personally, I always thought it would make a great shot to pose in (what looks like) full winter gear with ice axe and crampons on the black sand beach on the Big Island to use as a lead-in shot for the trip report, but if we don't need to pack them, we won't.)

Feedback and current condition information will be most appreciated!
My wife and I will be celebrating our 3rd anniversary in Hawaii, with a trip to Mauna Kea set for a couple weeks from now...

Is the summit a recognized (historical) heiau? My wife wants to know. She used to live in Hawaii as a teenager and is into these things.

I have no idea and would like to know myself. Looking forward to the journey!
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:07 pm

June 12th, 2006, 9:16 pm #6

It's my understanding that the summit altar is an ahu or lele but not at all historical. Does this make it not a heiau, or just a modern heiau??? Beats me. Anyway, it was put up sometime in the past 10 years after a native Hawaiian group that felt a regular ol' cairn that was already up there wasn't a suitable, respectful marker. This year it got vandalized, but it was rebuilt quickly.

Some people put offerings like chocolate in wrappers or jewelry or excess merit badges such. If so, you should make sure the merit badge is readily biodegradable, a wrap it in a ti leaf, or it just turns into an odd trash pile.
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Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 8:36 pm

June 19th, 2006, 2:18 pm #7

Nathan and I will be headed out to HI in a couple of weeks and one of our stops will be Hilo, to drive up Mauna Kea. (Already have a 4WD reserved from Harper's)

I'm wondering how much extra gear/clothing to pack for our short jaunt from the observatory parking lot to the actual summit. If I use the rule of thumb of 4 degrees per thousand feet, and it's 85 degrees at Hilo, it could be 50 or so degrees colder at the summit, so down around freezing.

I'm thinking long pants, a fleece and a wind shell, considering we'll be planning on just a quick walk (well, as "quickly" as we can walk at 13k+ having just driven from sea level with zero acclimation), our summit photos and back to the car.

I know that it does occasionally snow up on Mauna Kea...any reason to bring our ice axes and crampons? (Personally, I always thought it would make a great shot to pose in (what looks like) full winter gear with ice axe and crampons on the black sand beach on the Big Island to use as a lead-in shot for the trip report, but if we don't need to pack them, we won't.)

Feedback and current condition information will be most appreciated!
Alan,

Make sure you look toward the Hilo side of the island from the summit, as you can actually see the curvature of the Earth provided that the clouds cooperate. If you'd like, take a look at my website, txmountaineer.com, for information on a February climb.

Best of Luck!
Daniel
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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 3:15 pm

June 19th, 2006, 7:13 pm #8

My wife and I will be celebrating our 3rd anniversary in Hawaii, with a trip to Mauna Kea set for a couple weeks from now...

Is the summit a recognized (historical) heiau? My wife wants to know. She used to live in Hawaii as a teenager and is into these things.

I have no idea and would like to know myself. Looking forward to the journey!
Today, Pres. Bush created a new national monument called Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Marine National Monument. [try saying that fast three times!] [try saying that fast once!!]

The new monument is managed by NOAA and covers all the islands and atolls west of Kauai to Midway.

Maybe Scott & Beth can be the first Club members to visit it.

-----------------

When the Mauna Kea summit altar was vandalized, so too were similar altars in Hawaiian cities. Read the articles that Roger found to get the exact locations.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:10 pm

June 20th, 2006, 2:22 pm #9

Check:

Jane's Nihoa Island Page

This might be a plauible candidate for the monument's HP ... if it ever becomes a National Park, I guess John and Dave will have to hightail it out that way!

We're set to go in less than two weeks. No Nihoa for us, though. Just boring old Mauna Kea . Maybe we'll run into the Lost survivors, and help them out a bit. Just curious: why didn't they ever identify someone to climb the mountains behind their beachhead to scout the island and perhaps find a way out?
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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 3:15 pm

June 20th, 2006, 2:50 pm #10

Several Nat Mons have become Nat Parks recently.

Congaree Swamp NM is now Conagree NP
Great Sand Dunes NM is now Great Sand Dunes NP and Preserve

NHIMNM (NW Hawaii) is managed by NOAA so it's unlikely it'll ever be a NP, but researching the HP is always a good thing.

When on the Big Island, be sure to get a photo next to a coffee tree (east of Kona is a good spot) which is hard to do elsewhere in the states.

If you collect wineries in every state like I do, there's one on the east side of the island, just south of the nude beach....
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