Chinese Propose Official Renaming of Everest to Mount Qomolangma

Chinese Propose Official Renaming of Everest to Mount Qomolangma

roger
roger

November 20th, 2002, 12:59 pm #1

Peter Hillary will always call the world's tallest peak Mt Everest even though China wants Westerners to call it Mt Qomolangma.
China has launched a campaign accusing British "colonialists" of "ignorance and arrogance" by continuing to refer to Everest.
"British colonialists raped the sacred mountain of the Tibetans by giving it a false name," one report said.
"Until today the world is still persistently humiliating Mt Qomolangma with English-language hegemonism."
China wants the name changed before next year, the 50th anniversary of the first ascent by Sir Edmund Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay on May 29, 1953.
The mountain became known as Mt Everest in 1865 in honour of Sir George Everest, the Surveyor-General of India who mapped the 29,028ft peak in 1852.
Mt Qomolangma is the Chinese equivalent of the Tibetan name for the mountain, Chomolungma, meaning Mother of the World.
The Nepalese call it Sagarmatha or the Goddess of the Sky.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/storydisplay. ... on=general
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WingLady
WingLady

November 20th, 2002, 2:36 pm #2

"...Tibetan name for the mountain, Chomolungma, meaning Mother of the World.
The Nepalese call it Sagarmatha or the Goddess of the Sky."

Well, I certainly don't feel that the Chinese are great spokespeople for respecting the traditions of this region, but I tend to agree that "Everest" is a johnny-come-lately name, which doesn't seem at all fitting to the region or the local cultures.

But, whose culture should be honored? Should the mountain have 2 different names, depending on whether you are approaching it from the Nepal side or the Tibet side? I'm wondering if the Sherpa people have yet another name for the mountain, or do they use the Tibetan name?
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Ken Akerman
Ken Akerman

November 20th, 2002, 3:31 pm #3

But, whose culture should be honored? Should the mountain have 2 different names, depending on whether you are approaching it from the Nepal side or the Tibet side?

The mountain needs one internationally recognized name. Otherwise, it would be too confusing for the mountain to have multiple names.

While Mt. Everest is not in Britain, the British did do most of the early exploration, surveying, scientific research, and mountaineering work in the Mount Everest region, so it is proper that the mountain has a British name. I understand also there are good reasons to use the local cultural name, but what happens when there are two or more cultures in the region? Which one do we use? In this case, it appears to me that calling it Mt. Everest is the proper solution.

Ken
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Sean Cunniff
Sean Cunniff

November 20th, 2002, 3:48 pm #4

I generally resist engaging is these political debates, but your continual expression of right wing views has left me exasperated. It worries me a bit when one of the Club's Board members constantly extolls the virtues of candidates, elected officials and ideas which are anti-environment. Anyone who argues that highpointing is unrelated to environmentalism is flat wrong.

Who cares what Everest is called? Who cares if it has multiple names? It doesn't effect the mountain in any way.
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Olivier Kozlowski
Olivier Kozlowski

November 20th, 2002, 3:59 pm #5

But, whose culture should be honored? Should the mountain have 2 different names, depending on whether you are approaching it from the Nepal side or the Tibet side?

The mountain needs one internationally recognized name. Otherwise, it would be too confusing for the mountain to have multiple names.

While Mt. Everest is not in Britain, the British did do most of the early exploration, surveying, scientific research, and mountaineering work in the Mount Everest region, so it is proper that the mountain has a British name. I understand also there are good reasons to use the local cultural name, but what happens when there are two or more cultures in the region? Which one do we use? In this case, it appears to me that calling it Mt. Everest is the proper solution.

Ken
You say Marcy, he says Tahawus, let's call the whole thing off.

A country can, and often does, try to get people to use the name it assigns to a mountain. That doesn't mean that everybody will use it or even that there will be a single generally accepted name.
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Ken Akerman
Ken Akerman

November 20th, 2002, 4:12 pm #6

I generally resist engaging is these political debates, but your continual expression of right wing views has left me exasperated. It worries me a bit when one of the Club's Board members constantly extolls the virtues of candidates, elected officials and ideas which are anti-environment. Anyone who argues that highpointing is unrelated to environmentalism is flat wrong.

Who cares what Everest is called? Who cares if it has multiple names? It doesn't effect the mountain in any way.
It worries me a bit when one of the Club's Board members constantly extolls the virtues of candidates, elected officials and ideas which are anti-environment.

When have I done this? Why can't I be free to believe in what I believe? My views are in line with that of the mainstream of people in the USA.

So what is wrong with having Ronald Reagan as one of my personal heroes? He won 44 out of 50 states in 1980 and 49 out of 50 states in 1984, earning the support of nearly 6 out of every 10 people who voted that year. I was one of his voters that year (the first time I was eligible to vote in a Presidential election), so how could I be outside the mainstream if I voted for the candidate supported by more than 59% of voters and the majority of voters in almost every state?

What is political about the posting about Mount Everest, anyway? I was just commenting on the name of the highest mountain in the world. Leave the current name alone, thank you.

If you don't think that I am doing a good job as a member of the Board, then don't vote for me. However, I am confident that more people agree with me than disagree with me, so I will confidently run on my record when I run for reelection in 2005.

However, the Board is not a political body, so I feel that whatever my political and personal beliefs are should have absolutely no bearing on whether or not I am elected or reelected to the Board.

Ken Akerman
Highpointer Board Member since Spring 2002.
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John M.
John M.

November 20th, 2002, 10:22 pm #7

Peter Hillary will always call the world's tallest peak Mt Everest even though China wants Westerners to call it Mt Qomolangma.
China has launched a campaign accusing British "colonialists" of "ignorance and arrogance" by continuing to refer to Everest.
"British colonialists raped the sacred mountain of the Tibetans by giving it a false name," one report said.
"Until today the world is still persistently humiliating Mt Qomolangma with English-language hegemonism."
China wants the name changed before next year, the 50th anniversary of the first ascent by Sir Edmund Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay on May 29, 1953.
The mountain became known as Mt Everest in 1865 in honour of Sir George Everest, the Surveyor-General of India who mapped the 29,028ft peak in 1852.
Mt Qomolangma is the Chinese equivalent of the Tibetan name for the mountain, Chomolungma, meaning Mother of the World.
The Nepalese call it Sagarmatha or the Goddess of the Sky.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/storydisplay. ... on=general
Rainier was something else before it was Rainier. So was Everest, McKinley, and apparently Marcy. Can someone prepare such a list perhaps constraining it to just highpoints (state, county, or country)? This would be interesting indeed. If submitted, we'll run your favorite photo on the nl cover or something.

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Hojo
Hojo

November 21st, 2002, 1:53 am #8

"...Tibetan name for the mountain, Chomolungma, meaning Mother of the World.
The Nepalese call it Sagarmatha or the Goddess of the Sky."

Well, I certainly don't feel that the Chinese are great spokespeople for respecting the traditions of this region, but I tend to agree that "Everest" is a johnny-come-lately name, which doesn't seem at all fitting to the region or the local cultures.

But, whose culture should be honored? Should the mountain have 2 different names, depending on whether you are approaching it from the Nepal side or the Tibet side? I'm wondering if the Sherpa people have yet another name for the mountain, or do they use the Tibetan name?
I may be wrong but I was told by my brothers in SC that the man-made lake on the Savannah River - South Carolinians call it J. Strom Thurmond Lake and it's called something else on the Georgia side.

And in Mexico, the Rio Grande is Rio Bravo.

So yeah, 2 names for geographic locations do & can exist with out confusion.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 21st, 2002, 4:28 am #9

"...Tibetan name for the mountain, Chomolungma, meaning Mother of the World.
The Nepalese call it Sagarmatha or the Goddess of the Sky."

Well, I certainly don't feel that the Chinese are great spokespeople for respecting the traditions of this region, but I tend to agree that "Everest" is a johnny-come-lately name, which doesn't seem at all fitting to the region or the local cultures.

But, whose culture should be honored? Should the mountain have 2 different names, depending on whether you are approaching it from the Nepal side or the Tibet side? I'm wondering if the Sherpa people have yet another name for the mountain, or do they use the Tibetan name?
I am always getting messages from the "Free Tibet" folks to say Everest is in Tibet.

I find it interesting that China wants its own name on the peak rather than the Tibet name Chomolungma or the Nepal name Sagarmatha.

Most climbers I've heard who have climbed Mount McKinley call it Denali.

By the same standard if there was going to be a name change either the Tibet or the Nepal name would be much more suitable than the Chinese version.

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Ken Akerman
Ken Akerman

November 21st, 2002, 3:10 pm #10

I may be wrong but I was told by my brothers in SC that the man-made lake on the Savannah River - South Carolinians call it J. Strom Thurmond Lake and it's called something else on the Georgia side.

And in Mexico, the Rio Grande is Rio Bravo.

So yeah, 2 names for geographic locations do & can exist with out confusion.
The <a href=http://www.desertusa.com/magoct97/oct_cortez2.html>Gulf of California</a> is also called the <a href=http://www.cruisecortez.com/>Sea of Cortez</a>, for example.
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