Chicago Tribune Article on Highpointers and Paul Zumwalt

Chicago Tribune Article on Highpointers and Paul Zumwalt

roger
roger

September 4th, 2001, 2:03 pm #1

The Chicago Tribune has an article on the Highpointers and Paul Zumwalt in its Sept. 2 issue
High on high points
In search of our Midwest "peaks"
By Beth Gauper

http://chicagotribune.com/travel/chi-01 ... ep02.story

Excerpts:
Charles Mound, at 1,235 feet above sea level the lowest high point in any state not on an ocean, certainly was a nice place to be on a fall day. Near the U.S. Geological Survey benchmark, its thoughtful owners had placed two lawn chairs.

There were better views nearby, however, along the Mississippi River Valley. Still, over the previous two weeks, this particular spot had drawn visitors from Texas, California, Washington, Colorado and many other states, 36 of whom had signed the register that sat in an old milk box.

"My oxygen tanks ran out halfway up, but we made it," wrote a Daniel McDevitt, for whom Charles Mound was the 49th of the 50 state summits. For some, it was the first: "It's official, I have highpointed!" wrote Heather Behnke of Minneapolis. And for others, just one stop on a whirlwind tour: "8th high point in 2 weeks," noted Alan Applegate of Cleveland.

For these Highpointers, members of a national club that had just 32 members in 1987, a year after it was founded, and now numbers 2,200, nothing but the exact summit will do.

When surveyor Paul Zumwalt, author of the 1988 book "Fifty State Summits," found that the high point of Missouri actually was 400 feet away from the designated one, it caused consternation among hard-core Highpointers.

The most spectacular state high point near the Midwest is 7,242-foot Harney Peak in South Dakota's Black Hills. I climbed it from Cathedral Spires, a stand of billion-year-old granite, eventually joining hikers from two other trailheads. At the top, from a 1939 CCC fire tower, I could see a pollen "storm" rising from waves of ponderosa pines.

The Harney Peak trail, while long--I had to give my water to a suffering 6-year-old and a granola bar to a lightheaded man--is not particularly dangerous, though some high points are, especially Mt. McKinley (20,320 feet) in Alaska and Mt. Rainier ( 14,410 feet) in Washington. The most dangerous until recently, however, may have been 812-foot Jerimoth Hill in Rhode Island, where the late owner used to run off Highpointers with a shotgun.

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Utah Cox
Utah Cox

September 6th, 2001, 8:23 pm #2

This article also ran in the Baton Rouge Advocate awhile back. The author assumes that everyone who climbs highpoints is a member of the Highpointers Club. However, the 3 she quotes (Daniel McDevitt, Heather Behnke of Minneapolis, and Alan Applegate of Cleveland) from the summit register at Charles Mound are not listed as members in the current Highpointers Club's directory.
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John M
John M

September 7th, 2001, 5:00 pm #3

What's your guess?

Highpointing is a rather individualistic sport. Yes, you can team up with partners for tougher climbs and it's fun to go with friends or family. But for the most part we do it alone without the need for a Club.

Many people like to socially link themselves with other like-minded folk. The Club serves important functions that individuals can not hope to achieve.

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roger
roger

February 11th, 2002, 3:41 pm #4

The Chicago Tribune has an article on the Highpointers and Paul Zumwalt in its Sept. 2 issue
High on high points
In search of our Midwest "peaks"
By Beth Gauper

http://chicagotribune.com/travel/chi-01 ... ep02.story

Excerpts:
Charles Mound, at 1,235 feet above sea level the lowest high point in any state not on an ocean, certainly was a nice place to be on a fall day. Near the U.S. Geological Survey benchmark, its thoughtful owners had placed two lawn chairs.

There were better views nearby, however, along the Mississippi River Valley. Still, over the previous two weeks, this particular spot had drawn visitors from Texas, California, Washington, Colorado and many other states, 36 of whom had signed the register that sat in an old milk box.

"My oxygen tanks ran out halfway up, but we made it," wrote a Daniel McDevitt, for whom Charles Mound was the 49th of the 50 state summits. For some, it was the first: "It's official, I have highpointed!" wrote Heather Behnke of Minneapolis. And for others, just one stop on a whirlwind tour: "8th high point in 2 weeks," noted Alan Applegate of Cleveland.

For these Highpointers, members of a national club that had just 32 members in 1987, a year after it was founded, and now numbers 2,200, nothing but the exact summit will do.

When surveyor Paul Zumwalt, author of the 1988 book "Fifty State Summits," found that the high point of Missouri actually was 400 feet away from the designated one, it caused consternation among hard-core Highpointers.

The most spectacular state high point near the Midwest is 7,242-foot Harney Peak in South Dakota's Black Hills. I climbed it from Cathedral Spires, a stand of billion-year-old granite, eventually joining hikers from two other trailheads. At the top, from a 1939 CCC fire tower, I could see a pollen "storm" rising from waves of ponderosa pines.

The Harney Peak trail, while long--I had to give my water to a suffering 6-year-old and a granola bar to a lightheaded man--is not particularly dangerous, though some high points are, especially Mt. McKinley (20,320 feet) in Alaska and Mt. Rainier ( 14,410 feet) in Washington. The most dangerous until recently, however, may have been 812-foot Jerimoth Hill in Rhode Island, where the late owner used to run off Highpointers with a shotgun.
The daughter of Paul Zumwalt, the beloved highpointer and guidebook author, is throwing a 90th birthday party for Paul on the Saturday before Easter (March 30) in Peoria, Illinois. They are inviting highpointers to attend.

If you would like to attend you can write Susan Gore at [url=mailto:drs.gorz@greenbaynet.com]drs.gorz@greenbaynet.com[/url]

Send birthday cards to:

Paul Zumwalt
2305 N. Elmwood Avenue
Peoria, IL 61604
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go
go

February 11th, 2002, 5:02 pm #5

What's your guess?

Highpointing is a rather individualistic sport. Yes, you can team up with partners for tougher climbs and it's fun to go with friends or family. But for the most part we do it alone without the need for a Club.

Many people like to socially link themselves with other like-minded folk. The Club serves important functions that individuals can not hope to achieve.
well, you know how it goes. i am not a member because i don't want it to feel like once i've done my climbs that i have to submit proof for someone else's approval. i do it for me, me alone, and no one else.
honestly, the only reason i'd join is to continue to use this web-site, america's roof, for information if it became private.
i'm putting on my asbestos suit now as i'm pretty sure flames will follow.
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Paul Burkholder
Paul Burkholder

February 11th, 2002, 6:14 pm #6

No flames from me . . . but I am not a member either! I do agree this is a great site (thanks mostly to Roger). Lots of good information and very few real weirdos (maybe we are all a little weird if we enjoy walking somewhere just because it is a highpoint).
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roger
roger

February 11th, 2002, 10:02 pm #7

well, you know how it goes. i am not a member because i don't want it to feel like once i've done my climbs that i have to submit proof for someone else's approval. i do it for me, me alone, and no one else.
honestly, the only reason i'd join is to continue to use this web-site, america's roof, for information if it became private.
i'm putting on my asbestos suit now as i'm pretty sure flames will follow.
I've been dying to say that.

Thanks for the vote of confidence. I've tried to keep my hobby site as open as possible.

Like most things you get out of it what you put into it. The Highpointers are an interesting crew and the purpose of the club in the end is social.
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Winglady
Winglady

February 12th, 2002, 4:04 pm #8

well, you know how it goes. i am not a member because i don't want it to feel like once i've done my climbs that i have to submit proof for someone else's approval. i do it for me, me alone, and no one else.
honestly, the only reason i'd join is to continue to use this web-site, america's roof, for information if it became private.
i'm putting on my asbestos suit now as i'm pretty sure flames will follow.
...A GREAT quarterly newsletter (more a magazine than "just" a newsletter)

...Fun annual conventions where you get to meet -- in person! -- lots of the great people you "talk" to on this forum

That's a pretty good return on $15 a year.

And so far, we haven't made anyone "prove" what highpoints they have visited!
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Ken Akerman
Ken Akerman

February 14th, 2002, 3:39 pm #9

The daughter of Paul Zumwalt, the beloved highpointer and guidebook author, is throwing a 90th birthday party for Paul on the Saturday before Easter (March 30) in Peoria, Illinois. They are inviting highpointers to attend.

If you would like to attend you can write Susan Gore at [url=mailto:drs.gorz@greenbaynet.com]drs.gorz@greenbaynet.com[/url]

Send birthday cards to:

Paul Zumwalt
2305 N. Elmwood Avenue
Peoria, IL 61604
Paul is not the only one celebrating a 90th birthday this year. Happy Birthday today to the State of Arizona.
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Sam S.
Sam S.

February 14th, 2002, 7:10 pm #10

...A GREAT quarterly newsletter (more a magazine than "just" a newsletter)

...Fun annual conventions where you get to meet -- in person! -- lots of the great people you "talk" to on this forum

That's a pretty good return on $15 a year.

And so far, we haven't made anyone "prove" what highpoints they have visited!
We await the newsletter with great anticipation and read it the day it arrives. Not everyone is into organized clubs but this $15.00 is certainly worth it in my book.

As to the proof to others, all I have submitted is the number of highpoints I've scaled. It's my understanding that we use the honor system here and no self respecting peak bagger would cheat our fellow members.
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