career crisis

career crisis

Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:07 pm

June 20th, 2004, 3:32 am #1

So i get offered a job in Hawaii. It's so tempting. But i worry about being cut off from my professional world. My mom wails about how far from home i'll be.

Leave it to hiking buddy Melanie to bring up the TRUE crux of the decision...

"How will you be able to keep highpointing?"
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Joined: February 4th, 2004, 2:58 pm

June 20th, 2004, 1:39 pm #2

Well, you could start by climbing the highpoints of all the Hawaiian islands...

Surely you're not expecting sympathy about having to move to Hawaii??

----------------
D Winger
http://www.HighpointAdventures.com
http://www.GreatSandDunes.info
http://www.JoshuaTreeTrad.com
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:07 pm

June 20th, 2004, 5:40 pm #3

cohp.org says the highpoint of Kuaui hasn't been reached by any members yet because it is surrounded by miles of lush, impenetrable tropical rainforest. Sounds like a dare to me.

if you saw how little money i'm being offered for this job, you'd have sympathy...trust me.
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Joined: November 25th, 2000, 10:31 pm

June 21st, 2004, 5:45 pm #4

When I visited Kauai in 95 I asked about climbing Waialeale/Kawaikini, but all I got was "there is no trail". Extensive enquiries a few years later got one reply that "people trying to climb it are cited", something to do w/environmental issues. On a topo map of the island, the NE ridge offers a possible route from the Power Line Trail, which crosses it; but I couldn't tell from the map how difficult this ridge is. It could be a broad easy one; covered with impenetrable growth; or a jagged sheer eroded crumbling nightmare. Visitng Koke'e State Park on a beautiful clear day, the summits were visible across a plateau, not much higher; but it was the notorious Alika'i Swamp. The trail across part of it had boardwalks but they were incomplete and beyond that it was very muddy (it goes to a lookout, but I turned back). One chap did report reaching the summits across it.

W'le is supposed to have the world's biggest rainfall--another obstacle--while its neighbour K'ni is a bit higher. One newspaper article showed a rain gauge atop W'le but not how to get there; I suspect they took a helo up on a fine day. I took a helo tour later & the whole area was engulfed in rain clouds. There is supposed to be a heiau (temple site) on top so the natives must have known a way up. Good luck; be sure to report on your attempt.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:07 pm

June 25th, 2004, 6:03 am #5

So i get offered a job in Hawaii. It's so tempting. But i worry about being cut off from my professional world. My mom wails about how far from home i'll be.

Leave it to hiking buddy Melanie to bring up the TRUE crux of the decision...

"How will you be able to keep highpointing?"
Hawaii! Sorry Texas.

I'll be living on the wrong island, but can i bid for the 2008 Konvention anyway?

Aloha Highpointers!

mark

p.s. this puts a major wrench in my state highpointing plans. geez, after doing Mauna Kea, the next closest HP will be 3 time zones away. oh well, i'll still plan distant-future off-trail prominence camping hikes for Spruce Knob and Clingman's Dome...i'll just be planning them from a beach chair, with a 10-year calendar in one hand and a topo map in the other. actually i'll have rum in each hand, so never mind.

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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:10 pm

June 25th, 2004, 3:31 pm #6

After Mauna Kea, Mauna Loa, Haleakala, Kaala, Kawaikini, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park and all that, I'm sure you'll find other interesting, beautiful places to visit!

I'm up for a Hawaii 2008 convention. I didn't go the 2000 convention and as always, it's all about what suits me best
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Joined: July 13th, 2004, 6:15 am

July 13th, 2004, 6:21 am #7

So, after searching for hours, I can find no recorded ascent of Kawaikini. I'm sure it's been done by natives, but I can find no official ascent. There's not even very much info out there about the peak... Any thoughts?
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Joined: December 6th, 2005, 7:29 pm

December 6th, 2005, 7:31 pm #8

When I visited Kauai in 95 I asked about climbing Waialeale/Kawaikini, but all I got was "there is no trail". Extensive enquiries a few years later got one reply that "people trying to climb it are cited", something to do w/environmental issues. On a topo map of the island, the NE ridge offers a possible route from the Power Line Trail, which crosses it; but I couldn't tell from the map how difficult this ridge is. It could be a broad easy one; covered with impenetrable growth; or a jagged sheer eroded crumbling nightmare. Visitng Koke'e State Park on a beautiful clear day, the summits were visible across a plateau, not much higher; but it was the notorious Alika'i Swamp. The trail across part of it had boardwalks but they were incomplete and beyond that it was very muddy (it goes to a lookout, but I turned back). One chap did report reaching the summits across it.

W'le is supposed to have the world's biggest rainfall--another obstacle--while its neighbour K'ni is a bit higher. One newspaper article showed a rain gauge atop W'le but not how to get there; I suspect they took a helo up on a fine day. I took a helo tour later & the whole area was engulfed in rain clouds. There is supposed to be a heiau (temple site) on top so the natives must have known a way up. Good luck; be sure to report on your attempt.
There's an excellent site on climbing Waialeale at www.waialeale.org. Volcantrek8
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Joined: December 6th, 2005, 7:29 pm

December 6th, 2005, 7:34 pm #9

So, after searching for hours, I can find no recorded ascent of Kawaikini. I'm sure it's been done by natives, but I can find no official ascent. There's not even very much info out there about the peak... Any thoughts?
Kawaikini was reached in 1990 by Kathy Valier. More on climbing Waialeale at http://www.waialeale.org. Adios Volcantrek8
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Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:48 am

December 6th, 2005, 10:25 pm #10

When I visited Kauai in 95 I asked about climbing Waialeale/Kawaikini, but all I got was "there is no trail". Extensive enquiries a few years later got one reply that "people trying to climb it are cited", something to do w/environmental issues. On a topo map of the island, the NE ridge offers a possible route from the Power Line Trail, which crosses it; but I couldn't tell from the map how difficult this ridge is. It could be a broad easy one; covered with impenetrable growth; or a jagged sheer eroded crumbling nightmare. Visitng Koke'e State Park on a beautiful clear day, the summits were visible across a plateau, not much higher; but it was the notorious Alika'i Swamp. The trail across part of it had boardwalks but they were incomplete and beyond that it was very muddy (it goes to a lookout, but I turned back). One chap did report reaching the summits across it.

W'le is supposed to have the world's biggest rainfall--another obstacle--while its neighbour K'ni is a bit higher. One newspaper article showed a rain gauge atop W'le but not how to get there; I suspect they took a helo up on a fine day. I took a helo tour later & the whole area was engulfed in rain clouds. There is supposed to be a heiau (temple site) on top so the natives must have known a way up. Good luck; be sure to report on your attempt.
Roger,

Should have had helo land on summit (or winch you down) If you do bushwhack I don't think there are any BAD creatures in Hawaii?? Could it be any worse than some of the Rhododendron hells around here?
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