Camping on Mount Hood?

Camping on Mount Hood?

Joined: June 6th, 2004, 5:02 pm

March 2nd, 2005, 9:34 pm #1

Is there camping allowed on Mount Hood? Can you hike up to say, 9,000 feet and hit the summit the next day?

If you can, why don't more people do this? Seems like leaving yourself with a mile to the summit the next morning would be pretty convenient. What am I missing?
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Joined: March 2nd, 2005, 9:45 pm

March 2nd, 2005, 9:58 pm #2

I did Hood in 2000 and camped up on the mountain. Sure there are restrictions,(the dreaded blue bags etc.) but it is absolutely beautiful. We set up around the 8700 ft level and had great views of all the Cascade peaks to the south. You essentially need two days to climb then, the first day we left around 8am while the snow was still a little firm to set up camp. Enjoyed the entire afternoon lounging around camp. Got up the next morning around 5:30 to climb. Many other groups get up much earlier to do their one day ascent. Got down from the summit back to camp around 9:30, had a much better breakfast, broke camp and back down to the lodge by 2:00. Some drawbacks; need two good days of weather, have to haul a heavier load that first day(tent, bag etc.) but if you enjoy backpacking go for it.

offtrailhiker
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Joined: June 6th, 2004, 5:02 pm

March 3rd, 2005, 4:21 am #3

Thanks for the response... I definitely don't mind carrying a little extra weight up to camp.

May I ask how long it took you to reach 8700' the first day?
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:07 pm

March 3rd, 2005, 8:27 am #4

Is there camping allowed on Mount Hood? Can you hike up to say, 9,000 feet and hit the summit the next day?

If you can, why don't more people do this? Seems like leaving yourself with a mile to the summit the next morning would be pretty convenient. What am I missing?
I camped also just a little above the top of the Palmer ski lift, at about 8700'. I was glad i did it that way. The only drawback was that there was noise from the grooming machines on the ski slopes that lasted until dark.

It took me 2 and a half hours to walk up from Timberline Lodge to 8700'. I did it in the afternoon. My trip report is in the trip report section.

Be careful up there.
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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 6:08 am

March 3rd, 2005, 7:33 pm #5

Is there camping allowed on Mount Hood? Can you hike up to say, 9,000 feet and hit the summit the next day?

If you can, why don't more people do this? Seems like leaving yourself with a mile to the summit the next morning would be pretty convenient. What am I missing?
In a similar vein, is it typical to see people establishing a high camp on Rainier on the Emmons Route, say somewhere above the Corridor, or even a summit bivy?

Assuming I can get a team together for Rainier this summer, I'd be interested in maximizing the experience out there.
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Joined: March 2nd, 2005, 9:45 pm

March 3rd, 2005, 8:08 pm #6

I did Hood in 2000 and camped up on the mountain. Sure there are restrictions,(the dreaded blue bags etc.) but it is absolutely beautiful. We set up around the 8700 ft level and had great views of all the Cascade peaks to the south. You essentially need two days to climb then, the first day we left around 8am while the snow was still a little firm to set up camp. Enjoyed the entire afternoon lounging around camp. Got up the next morning around 5:30 to climb. Many other groups get up much earlier to do their one day ascent. Got down from the summit back to camp around 9:30, had a much better breakfast, broke camp and back down to the lodge by 2:00. Some drawbacks; need two good days of weather, have to haul a heavier load that first day(tent, bag etc.) but if you enjoy backpacking go for it.

offtrailhiker
Markv hit it just about right. It took us abiut 2.5 hours from Timberline to the top of the Palmer lift where we set up camp. We could have made better time, but it was a beautiful day and we were always stopping and looking around... enjoying our hike. I plan on doing the trip again in a few years when my 9 year old is ready to climb Hood and I'll camp on the mountain again. Enjoy.

offtrailhiker
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Joined: October 22nd, 2004, 3:52 am

March 10th, 2005, 11:40 pm #7

In a similar vein, is it typical to see people establishing a high camp on Rainier on the Emmons Route, say somewhere above the Corridor, or even a summit bivy?

Assuming I can get a team together for Rainier this summer, I'd be interested in maximizing the experience out there.
Yes, people often camp around 11,000 feet on the Emmons Glacier route. As there are limits on how many people can camp at Camp Schurman you may have to. When I climbed the Emmons, due to the permit issue we ended up camping fairly low the first day (maybe 7,000 feet), stayed at around 11,000 feet on the glacier the second night, then summited and hiked out the next. This worked out very well since there's about 10,000 feet of elevation gain on the route, and it puts you in pretty good shape for summit day (which is still long). Watch out for crevasses on the Inter Glacier below Camp Schurman also. Similarly, on the Dissapointment Cleaver route, I prefer to go past Camp Muir and camp around 11,000 feet at Ingraham Flats (Ingraham Glacier). Puts you in good summit position. As we are having almost no winter here in the Northwest, probably earlier in the year will be better than later. For Hood, however, unless someone really wants to, I'm not sure it's worth bringing up the extra camping stuff.
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Joined: March 13th, 2005, 6:06 am

March 13th, 2005, 6:14 am #8

In a similar vein, is it typical to see people establishing a high camp on Rainier on the Emmons Route, say somewhere above the Corridor, or even a summit bivy?

Assuming I can get a team together for Rainier this summer, I'd be interested in maximizing the experience out there.
You can camp in the crater with the usual permits. The number is limited, but I've never heard of it being crowded. Tough to carry your tent or bivy all that way, and the risk of getting snowed in is always there. Sounds like a fun trip, though!
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Joined: March 15th, 2005, 11:24 pm

March 15th, 2005, 11:39 pm #9

Yes, people often camp around 11,000 feet on the Emmons Glacier route. As there are limits on how many people can camp at Camp Schurman you may have to. When I climbed the Emmons, due to the permit issue we ended up camping fairly low the first day (maybe 7,000 feet), stayed at around 11,000 feet on the glacier the second night, then summited and hiked out the next. This worked out very well since there's about 10,000 feet of elevation gain on the route, and it puts you in pretty good shape for summit day (which is still long). Watch out for crevasses on the Inter Glacier below Camp Schurman also. Similarly, on the Dissapointment Cleaver route, I prefer to go past Camp Muir and camp around 11,000 feet at Ingraham Flats (Ingraham Glacier). Puts you in good summit position. As we are having almost no winter here in the Northwest, probably earlier in the year will be better than later. For Hood, however, unless someone really wants to, I'm not sure it's worth bringing up the extra camping stuff.
I also made the extra 1,000 ft. climb to Ingraham Flats on Day 1 of my Rainier climb in 1980 to escape the crowds that were building at Camp Muir. I always imagined that it was a much more enjoyable experience than fighting over space and noise at Muir. Also, this choice provides you a head start on summit day by starting out at the base of Disappointment Cleaver. It was quite a sight early on summit day to climb out of my tent and see the many headlamps ascending the cleaver before the sun came up. The liability, of course, is hauling all of your camping gear up another 1,000 feet vertical when you are getting very tired, but that is a choice you can make on the spot. No need for reservations or anything like that (unless times have changed since I was last there).


Karl Heller
Back From a Second Tour
of Army Paradise
(Think I'll retire this
time!!)
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 6:42 pm

March 16th, 2005, 1:25 am #10

Karl, I think the Mount Rainier National Park regulations have chagned since your visit in 1980. When I climbed Mount Rainier on Tuesday in July 1999 I wanted to stay at Ingraham Flats the night before my summit bid, but I was prevented from doing so because it was all booked up. I then requested to stay at Camp Muir and was prevented from doing so because it was all booked up. I settled for camping below Anvil Rock, about 1,000 feet below Camp Muir.
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