Best non-highpoint climbs

Best non-highpoint climbs

Joined: January 29th, 2004, 3:33 am

May 16th, 2007, 4:08 pm #1

Highpointers, of course, strive to climb the highest peaks. However, sometimes doing only that misses some great mountains/areas.
What are some of the best non-highpoint hikes out there?
Here's five of the best I've done, mostly in Utah, but I'm sure other forum users can point out many more.
My picks:
1. Navajo Mountain. Elevation, 10,388, S.E. Utah. You need a permit from the Navajo tribe and it's not much of a hike if you have a four-wheel drive vehicle and drive to the top, but the isolation and the views of Rainbow Bridge from above were great.
2. Notch Peak, Utah, southwest of Delta, 9,655 foot elevation. Has a spectacular, sheer cliff on its west side. Also has great centerpiece views of Utah's west desert area.
3. Frary Peak, Antelope Island, Utah, 6,596-foot elevation. With buffalo roaming the area, this peak gives a 360-degree aqua view of the Great Salt Lake and its west side seems more like a wilderness area than a state park.
4. Mount St. Helens, 8,365-foot elevation, Washington State. A fascinating look at the power of nature during about a 6-mile, one-way hike. Great views of Rainier. even Mount Shasta, on a clear day. Requires a special permit.
5. Columbia Gorge, Oregon, east of Portland. Contains dozens of short hiking possibilities to waterfalls, in the shadow of Mount Hood.
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Joined: August 2nd, 2001, 8:13 pm

May 16th, 2007, 5:36 pm #2

Ok, it's a county HP (Madeira county, CA) but I'll have to vote for my eponymous peak.

The hike from Agnew Meadows up past Shadow Lake and the campsites around Ediza Lake are gorgeous, and you have great views of Mt. Ritter, neighboring Banner Peak and the Minarets, all prime climbing destinations. Ritter and Banner are good 3rd-class scrambles, with quite a bit of snow climbing (ice axe and crampons required) for good measure. The Minarets are real 4th and 5th class rock climbing.

For the easy way up Mt. Ritter, check the route description in my 1999 trip report via the link, above.

Plus, if you drive over to Mammoth Lakes from the Bay Area, you necessarily pass through Yosemite, and there are lots of great hikes and non-technical climbs there...Half Dome, Lempert Dome up in Tuolomne Meadows, the Yosemite Falls trail, and many others. Obviously, if you're into big wall climbs, you have the face of Half Dome, and el Capitan to tempt you, as well.
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Joined: January 6th, 2006, 7:55 pm

May 16th, 2007, 6:24 pm #3

Highpointers, of course, strive to climb the highest peaks. However, sometimes doing only that misses some great mountains/areas.
What are some of the best non-highpoint hikes out there?
Here's five of the best I've done, mostly in Utah, but I'm sure other forum users can point out many more.
My picks:
1. Navajo Mountain. Elevation, 10,388, S.E. Utah. You need a permit from the Navajo tribe and it's not much of a hike if you have a four-wheel drive vehicle and drive to the top, but the isolation and the views of Rainbow Bridge from above were great.
2. Notch Peak, Utah, southwest of Delta, 9,655 foot elevation. Has a spectacular, sheer cliff on its west side. Also has great centerpiece views of Utah's west desert area.
3. Frary Peak, Antelope Island, Utah, 6,596-foot elevation. With buffalo roaming the area, this peak gives a 360-degree aqua view of the Great Salt Lake and its west side seems more like a wilderness area than a state park.
4. Mount St. Helens, 8,365-foot elevation, Washington State. A fascinating look at the power of nature during about a 6-mile, one-way hike. Great views of Rainier. even Mount Shasta, on a clear day. Requires a special permit.
5. Columbia Gorge, Oregon, east of Portland. Contains dozens of short hiking possibilities to waterfalls, in the shadow of Mount Hood.
is one of my favorites too. All of Antelope Island is one of Utah's best kept secrets.

The loop up Paintbrush canyon to Lake Solitude and down Cascade Canyon back to Jenny Lake is a must do.

Any state highpointer who does Mt Mansfield and doesn't do Camel's Hump, IMHO, is missing the better of the two. It is only 300+/- lower but is one of the few undeveloped peaks left in Vermont and is only an hour or so away.

The rim to rim in the Grand Canyon was one of the most challenging, awe inspiring and memorable hike/climbs I have done.

Not enough time to list them all and there are many. It is a big world out there!!
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Joined: November 1st, 2003, 10:43 pm

May 16th, 2007, 8:14 pm #4

Highpointers, of course, strive to climb the highest peaks. However, sometimes doing only that misses some great mountains/areas.
What are some of the best non-highpoint hikes out there?
Here's five of the best I've done, mostly in Utah, but I'm sure other forum users can point out many more.
My picks:
1. Navajo Mountain. Elevation, 10,388, S.E. Utah. You need a permit from the Navajo tribe and it's not much of a hike if you have a four-wheel drive vehicle and drive to the top, but the isolation and the views of Rainbow Bridge from above were great.
2. Notch Peak, Utah, southwest of Delta, 9,655 foot elevation. Has a spectacular, sheer cliff on its west side. Also has great centerpiece views of Utah's west desert area.
3. Frary Peak, Antelope Island, Utah, 6,596-foot elevation. With buffalo roaming the area, this peak gives a 360-degree aqua view of the Great Salt Lake and its west side seems more like a wilderness area than a state park.
4. Mount St. Helens, 8,365-foot elevation, Washington State. A fascinating look at the power of nature during about a 6-mile, one-way hike. Great views of Rainier. even Mount Shasta, on a clear day. Requires a special permit.
5. Columbia Gorge, Oregon, east of Portland. Contains dozens of short hiking possibilities to waterfalls, in the shadow of Mount Hood.
Everyone's list will be different, but here's mine:

1. Half Dome in Yosemite via the cable ladder: 16.2 miles including two spectacular waterfalls (Vernal & Nevada), a thrilling cable ladder climb, and an unparalled view of Yosemite Valley.

2. Cascade Pass & Stehekin Arm in north Cascades NP: Remarkable views of the North Cascades that just keep getting better and better as you climb. "Best" hike in the Northwest.

3. Telescope Peak in Death Valley NP: 14.5 miles to 11,049' sharp summit, where you can "see forever," including right down to Badwater (lowest pt) & west to Mt. Whitney (highest pt).

4. Teewinot Mt. in Grand Teton NP: Incredibly sharp 12,325 summit once rated by Backpacker as one of the most spectacular places in US. No matter how seasoned a climber you are, I defy you to stand upright on this tiny exposed summit!

5. Franconia Ridge in the White Mts. of NH: 9 mile hike to a narrow exposed ridgeline running from 5,248 ft Mt. Lafayette. Includes waterfalls & open vistas to Mt. Washington. "Best" hike in the Northeast.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 6:42 pm

May 16th, 2007, 10:04 pm #5

Highpointers, of course, strive to climb the highest peaks. However, sometimes doing only that misses some great mountains/areas.
What are some of the best non-highpoint hikes out there?
Here's five of the best I've done, mostly in Utah, but I'm sure other forum users can point out many more.
My picks:
1. Navajo Mountain. Elevation, 10,388, S.E. Utah. You need a permit from the Navajo tribe and it's not much of a hike if you have a four-wheel drive vehicle and drive to the top, but the isolation and the views of Rainbow Bridge from above were great.
2. Notch Peak, Utah, southwest of Delta, 9,655 foot elevation. Has a spectacular, sheer cliff on its west side. Also has great centerpiece views of Utah's west desert area.
3. Frary Peak, Antelope Island, Utah, 6,596-foot elevation. With buffalo roaming the area, this peak gives a 360-degree aqua view of the Great Salt Lake and its west side seems more like a wilderness area than a state park.
4. Mount St. Helens, 8,365-foot elevation, Washington State. A fascinating look at the power of nature during about a 6-mile, one-way hike. Great views of Rainier. even Mount Shasta, on a clear day. Requires a special permit.
5. Columbia Gorge, Oregon, east of Portland. Contains dozens of short hiking possibilities to waterfalls, in the shadow of Mount Hood.
Best is certainly a subjective term. I guess there are two ways to answer the question - either the most recent five I've climbed (most recent memories) or the next five that I'll try to climb (planning is certainly part of the enjoyment).

Here are my five most recent climbs.

1. Polar Bear Peak (6614) in the Western Chugach Mountains - challenging climb with views of Knik Arm.
2. Byron Peak (4750) in the Kenai Mountains - glacier climb with views of both Prince William Sound and Turnagain Arm.
3. Flaketop Peak (4514) in the Western Chugach Mountains - nearest peak to my house and close enough that I climbed it on a Monday after work.
4. Indianhouse Mountain (4350) in the Western Chugach Mountains - neat climb that starts at Turnagain Arm and has a tremendous 1,300-foot glissade on the descent.
5. Peak 3980 in the Western Chugach Mountains - good views of backcountry and Knik Arm alike and close enough to the trailhead that I climbed it on a Thursday after work.

Here are the five that I would most like to climb.

1. Bellicose Peak (7640) in the Western Chugach Mountains - challenging glacier climb that I turned back on previously. Has a prominence of 2490 feet. Highest point in the Peters Creek drainage. And 2 miles down the ridge is Mount Rumble (7530) with 2,480 feet of prominence.
2. Whiteout Peak (7135) in the Western Chugach Mountains - a glacier climb overlooking some really remote territory with many unclimbed peaks to the east.
3. Mount Yukla (7535) in the Western Chugach Mountains - the highest point in the Eagle River drainage and a glacier climb.
4. Mount West Kiliak (7450) in the Western Chugach Mountains - a challenging climb that I turned back on previously; great views of Mount Yukla.
5. Hunter's Peak (7549) in the Western Chugach Mountains - a glacier climb in a remote area northeast of Anchorage. While on a ridge at sunset on a previous attempt, I heard the music from the Hunter Creek Bluegrass Festival several miles away. Has a prominence of 2099 feet.

All of these climbs are in southcentral Alaska and none require special permits.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 9:07 pm

May 18th, 2007, 5:56 pm #6

Highpointers, of course, strive to climb the highest peaks. However, sometimes doing only that misses some great mountains/areas.
What are some of the best non-highpoint hikes out there?
Here's five of the best I've done, mostly in Utah, but I'm sure other forum users can point out many more.
My picks:
1. Navajo Mountain. Elevation, 10,388, S.E. Utah. You need a permit from the Navajo tribe and it's not much of a hike if you have a four-wheel drive vehicle and drive to the top, but the isolation and the views of Rainbow Bridge from above were great.
2. Notch Peak, Utah, southwest of Delta, 9,655 foot elevation. Has a spectacular, sheer cliff on its west side. Also has great centerpiece views of Utah's west desert area.
3. Frary Peak, Antelope Island, Utah, 6,596-foot elevation. With buffalo roaming the area, this peak gives a 360-degree aqua view of the Great Salt Lake and its west side seems more like a wilderness area than a state park.
4. Mount St. Helens, 8,365-foot elevation, Washington State. A fascinating look at the power of nature during about a 6-mile, one-way hike. Great views of Rainier. even Mount Shasta, on a clear day. Requires a special permit.
5. Columbia Gorge, Oregon, east of Portland. Contains dozens of short hiking possibilities to waterfalls, in the shadow of Mount Hood.
1. Kalalau Trail, Kauai. All the write-ups are true. I wish we had taken more than 3 days for it though.

2. Paria Canyon, Utah/Arizona. Again, i wish we had more time for it. Will do it via Buckskin Gulch if i ever do it again. But this is the coolest canyon i've been in, and about the most opposite of a highpoint climb you can find.

3. John Muir Trail, California. Though climbing the 14ers along the way might make this part-highpoint. It took 3 years of planning to make 17 days off to do the whole trail, and it was worth it.

4. Matt Davis-Steep Ravine Loop, Marin County, California. Coastal views, a mountain lion, rattlesnake, and a white owl all in one dayhike, and beautiful redwoods without the crowds.

Tie for 5th: Ka'au Crater waterfall climb, Oahu, Walk to the current lava flow, Hawaii, and Royal Basin, Olympic National Park.
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Joined: August 20th, 2005, 2:12 am

May 20th, 2007, 1:47 pm #7

Highpointers, of course, strive to climb the highest peaks. However, sometimes doing only that misses some great mountains/areas.
What are some of the best non-highpoint hikes out there?
Here's five of the best I've done, mostly in Utah, but I'm sure other forum users can point out many more.
My picks:
1. Navajo Mountain. Elevation, 10,388, S.E. Utah. You need a permit from the Navajo tribe and it's not much of a hike if you have a four-wheel drive vehicle and drive to the top, but the isolation and the views of Rainbow Bridge from above were great.
2. Notch Peak, Utah, southwest of Delta, 9,655 foot elevation. Has a spectacular, sheer cliff on its west side. Also has great centerpiece views of Utah's west desert area.
3. Frary Peak, Antelope Island, Utah, 6,596-foot elevation. With buffalo roaming the area, this peak gives a 360-degree aqua view of the Great Salt Lake and its west side seems more like a wilderness area than a state park.
4. Mount St. Helens, 8,365-foot elevation, Washington State. A fascinating look at the power of nature during about a 6-mile, one-way hike. Great views of Rainier. even Mount Shasta, on a clear day. Requires a special permit.
5. Columbia Gorge, Oregon, east of Portland. Contains dozens of short hiking possibilities to waterfalls, in the shadow of Mount Hood.
My five "best" peaks would be: (ok, so I can't count!)

Baboquivari Peak (AZ) fun climbing by any of several routes
Weaver's Needle (AZ) Keeps your interest up.
Bridge Mountain (NV) in Red Rock Canyon. Fun scrambling.
Mount Olympus (WA) great snow climbing & rock scrambling
Mount Timpanogos (UT) nice hike, outstanding views
Devil's Crag #1 (CA) challenging mountaineering route

Can't list them but most of CA 14'ers and high 13'ers are "must do's".

Black Kaweah, etc.
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