Aron Ralston Sucked Into CBS's "Lynch for Pay" Scandal

Aron Ralston Sucked Into CBS's "Lynch for Pay" Scandal

roger
roger

June 19th, 2003, 1:39 pm #1

Of course, if CBS News really didn't want to be in the position of effectively paying Pfc. Lynch for an interview, it had an easy way to avoid that suspicion: Don't present it as a corporate package. But the network hoped that its corporate cousins would help seal the deal. Nor was this the only such CBS effort. After hiker Aron Ralston cut off his arm to free himself from a boulder, the newsmagazine "60 Minutes," hoping to persuade Mr. Ralston to let it film his rehabilitation, noted: "We can put you in touch with CBS Entertainment should you be interested in pursuing a television movie; with Paramount Pictures should you want to explore any movie possibilities; and with Simon & Schuster should Aron be interested in writing a book about his experience. Those are all options for you to consider, and all things that we can help you with."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/ar ... Jun18.html
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roger
roger

June 19th, 2003, 1:54 pm #2

I locked the original Aron Ralston thread because it was getting too big. It is available here:
http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/mes ... 1051853734
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roger
roger

June 29th, 2003, 9:23 pm #3

Of course, if CBS News really didn't want to be in the position of effectively paying Pfc. Lynch for an interview, it had an easy way to avoid that suspicion: Don't present it as a corporate package. But the network hoped that its corporate cousins would help seal the deal. Nor was this the only such CBS effort. After hiker Aron Ralston cut off his arm to free himself from a boulder, the newsmagazine "60 Minutes," hoping to persuade Mr. Ralston to let it film his rehabilitation, noted: "We can put you in touch with CBS Entertainment should you be interested in pursuing a television movie; with Paramount Pictures should you want to explore any movie possibilities; and with Simon & Schuster should Aron be interested in writing a book about his experience. Those are all options for you to consider, and all things that we can help you with."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/ar ... Jun18.html
An Australian coal miner trapped three kilometres underground by an overturned tractor cut off his own arm with a box-cutting knife, police say.
The 44-year-old man was working late at the Hunter Valley mine when the tractor tipped over, crushing his arm and trapping him.
http://onenews.nzoom.com/onenews_detail ... -9,00.html
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roger
roger

July 4th, 2003, 5:05 pm #4

Of course, if CBS News really didn't want to be in the position of effectively paying Pfc. Lynch for an interview, it had an easy way to avoid that suspicion: Don't present it as a corporate package. But the network hoped that its corporate cousins would help seal the deal. Nor was this the only such CBS effort. After hiker Aron Ralston cut off his arm to free himself from a boulder, the newsmagazine "60 Minutes," hoping to persuade Mr. Ralston to let it film his rehabilitation, noted: "We can put you in touch with CBS Entertainment should you be interested in pursuing a television movie; with Paramount Pictures should you want to explore any movie possibilities; and with Simon & Schuster should Aron be interested in writing a book about his experience. Those are all options for you to consider, and all things that we can help you with."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/ar ... Jun18.html
The Aspen Times in its July 4, 2003, has an exclusive interview with Aron Ralston on his first climb since the accident. The article is titled "Independence Day for Aron Ralston too" By Tim Mutrie

For his first summit since performing a crude amputation in a remote Utah Canyon, Aspen’s
Aron Ralston chose Resolution Mountain. Or perhaps, the peak near Leadville chose him — it’s where he and two friends were caught in a massive avalanche in February.

The only thing not recovered during last weekend’s overnight outing was Ralston’s right glove — precisely what he doesn’t need anymore after cutting off his right hand to escape from Utah’s Bluejohn Canyon on May 1.
http://www.aspentimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll ... /307030033
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roger
roger

July 14th, 2003, 2:16 pm #5

Of course, if CBS News really didn't want to be in the position of effectively paying Pfc. Lynch for an interview, it had an easy way to avoid that suspicion: Don't present it as a corporate package. But the network hoped that its corporate cousins would help seal the deal. Nor was this the only such CBS effort. After hiker Aron Ralston cut off his arm to free himself from a boulder, the newsmagazine "60 Minutes," hoping to persuade Mr. Ralston to let it film his rehabilitation, noted: "We can put you in touch with CBS Entertainment should you be interested in pursuing a television movie; with Paramount Pictures should you want to explore any movie possibilities; and with Simon & Schuster should Aron be interested in writing a book about his experience. Those are all options for you to consider, and all things that we can help you with."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/ar ... Jun18.html
A source at the "Late Show with David Letterman" confirmed Ralston is a scheduled guest this month but emphasized that the show’s scheduling can change at a moment’s notice. The source requested anonymity.
http://www.aspendailynews.com/articles.cfm?id=5
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John M.
John M.

July 19th, 2003, 3:58 pm #6

check out Letterman on Monday July 21

- Anon.
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Ken Akerman
Ken Akerman

July 20th, 2003, 8:15 am #7

A source at the "Late Show with David Letterman" confirmed Ralston is a scheduled guest this month but emphasized that the show’s scheduling can change at a moment’s notice. The source requested anonymity.
http://www.aspendailynews.com/articles.cfm?id=5
Consult the webpage for the <a href=http://www.cbs.com/latenight/lateshow/>Late Show with David Letterman</a> for the scheduled guests for each day's show. Aron Ralston is scheduled to be on the show this Monday, July 21. Check the list of this week's guests <a href=http://www.cbs.com/latenight/lateshow/s ... ml>here</a>.
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Mark S
Mark S

July 20th, 2003, 2:30 pm #8

Of course, if CBS News really didn't want to be in the position of effectively paying Pfc. Lynch for an interview, it had an easy way to avoid that suspicion: Don't present it as a corporate package. But the network hoped that its corporate cousins would help seal the deal. Nor was this the only such CBS effort. After hiker Aron Ralston cut off his arm to free himself from a boulder, the newsmagazine "60 Minutes," hoping to persuade Mr. Ralston to let it film his rehabilitation, noted: "We can put you in touch with CBS Entertainment should you be interested in pursuing a television movie; with Paramount Pictures should you want to explore any movie possibilities; and with Simon & Schuster should Aron be interested in writing a book about his experience. Those are all options for you to consider, and all things that we can help you with."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/ar ... Jun18.html
OK, let me preface this by saying that I think this guy's basic survival skills are incredible and very few people could have done what he did in order to survive, but I found the article on Ralston in this month's National Geographic Adventure to be very interesting and very revealing. The thought I came away with from the story is that Ralston was overdue for exactly this sort of thing to happen.

Let's not make a star out of Ralston for what can only be described as a history of incredibly poor judgement. Apparently, Ralston became interested in the outdoors after reading Krakauers's Into Thin Air and has made no effort to hide the fact that he wanted to become "known." Well, he's known now and he sure as hell seems to be eating up the spotlight.

I'm not trying to be petty here ... I've stood up and cheered on this board for Ted Keizer's and Ed Viestur's exploits. But I can't understand why people
want to put this guy up on a pedastal for ignoring all of the rules of safety that a competent outdoorsman understands and promotes.

Before you slam me too hard here, please read the story in Adventure.

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Doug B
Doug B

July 21st, 2003, 5:12 am #9

I just saw the promo for Aron Ralston's appearance on Late Show with David Letterman. I read the NG Adventure article too. I agree that this would have been avoided by a 10 second speech with even a casual acquaintance like a co-worker. A speech like, I'm going climbing in Bluejohn canyon Utah, I'll be back Monday.

But think about it, would anyone be willing to trade their right hand for any amount of fame or time in the limelight? He is famous now, but is he a hero?
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Steve Gruhn
Steve Gruhn

July 21st, 2003, 5:39 pm #10

OK, let me preface this by saying that I think this guy's basic survival skills are incredible and very few people could have done what he did in order to survive, but I found the article on Ralston in this month's National Geographic Adventure to be very interesting and very revealing. The thought I came away with from the story is that Ralston was overdue for exactly this sort of thing to happen.

Let's not make a star out of Ralston for what can only be described as a history of incredibly poor judgement. Apparently, Ralston became interested in the outdoors after reading Krakauers's Into Thin Air and has made no effort to hide the fact that he wanted to become "known." Well, he's known now and he sure as hell seems to be eating up the spotlight.

I'm not trying to be petty here ... I've stood up and cheered on this board for Ted Keizer's and Ed Viestur's exploits. But I can't understand why people
want to put this guy up on a pedastal for ignoring all of the rules of safety that a competent outdoorsman understands and promotes.

Before you slam me too hard here, please read the story in Adventure.
It is interesting to read of backcountry accidents. Most accidents happen to either the very inexperienced or the extremely experienced.

The inexperienced simply get in way over their heads and don't have the skills to prevent accidents or minimize their consequences.

The very experienced often "push the envelope" to challenge themselves and consciously accept objective hazards. They knowingly take risks and understand the consequences of failure.

In Ralston's case, his arm could not have been saved, even if he had a partner with him immediately after the accident. Leaving a trip itinerary does not guarantee an accident-free trip. In fact, only staying home could absolutely guarantee a risk-free life. Each outdoor enthusiast must determine his own risk tolerance and live life accordingly. It appears that Ralston had a higher risk tolerance than most. He also lived life in a way that others have only dreamed about.

As those with lower risk tolerances decry Ralston's actions, those with high risk tolerances hear the moral pontificating of the timid who choose to pretend that life can be lived risk-free.
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