50 Summits in Winter

50 Summits in Winter

Willy
Willy

July 12th, 2003, 5:40 am #1

I don't see mention of it on this site but Dave Johnston became the first person to summit all of the 50 summits in winter during this past winter. Dave was often a climbing partner with Vin Hoeman in the 60's, which may explain his inspiration for doing the summits. He was also one of the three climbers to reach the summit of Denali in 1967 during the first winter ascent. You can read about it in Minus 148. The list of those doing these summits in winter is likely to remain quite short. Another first for Alaska ! Willy Hersman, Mountaineering Club of Alaska.
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pj
pj

July 12th, 2003, 12:32 pm #2

I'd guess this feat will not be duplicated. Even the non-Alaska 49 seem hardly possible in Winter. I've done 17 in Winter, but its an "easy" list, with NH as the hardest.
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John M.
John M.

July 13th, 2003, 9:45 pm #3

I don't see mention of it on this site but Dave Johnston became the first person to summit all of the 50 summits in winter during this past winter. Dave was often a climbing partner with Vin Hoeman in the 60's, which may explain his inspiration for doing the summits. He was also one of the three climbers to reach the summit of Denali in 1967 during the first winter ascent. You can read about it in Minus 148. The list of those doing these summits in winter is likely to remain quite short. Another first for Alaska ! Willy Hersman, Mountaineering Club of Alaska.
Willy -

I had breakfast with Dave a few days ago and he is lacking one state to make the Winter Ascent claim. I have no doubt he'll do it. We'll need to wait until at least December 21, 2003.

- John M.
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Joined: August 21st, 2002, 3:11 pm

July 14th, 2003, 4:03 am #4

Which one. Don't leave us hanging!

This is not a state highpoint thing, but Tom Sawyer, who has done all 50 state highpoints (not in winter), has done, in winter, all but about 200 of the northeast (PA to ME)summits over 3000 feet. He has about 200 in New York to complete that list of several thousand. (I have a copy of the list, but am too lazy to dig it out right now.)

Ivan Ash
jivan@ieee.org
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Mohamed Ellozy
Mohamed Ellozy

July 14th, 2003, 10:10 am #5

> He has about 200 in New York to complete that list of several thousand.

Exact counts change as different people interpret col depths differently, but the number in my mind is 770+ peaks. Which in no way diminshes the achievement!
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Joined: August 21st, 2002, 3:11 pm

July 14th, 2003, 1:18 pm #6

I stand corrected. Agree it is still quite an accomplishment. (Does your count use a 200 foot minimum col?)

Ivan Ash
jivan@ieee.org
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Steve Gruhn
Steve Gruhn

July 14th, 2003, 6:10 pm #7

Which one. Don't leave us hanging!

This is not a state highpoint thing, but Tom Sawyer, who has done all 50 state highpoints (not in winter), has done, in winter, all but about 200 of the northeast (PA to ME)summits over 3000 feet. He has about 200 in New York to complete that list of several thousand. (I have a copy of the list, but am too lazy to dig it out right now.)

Ivan Ash
jivan@ieee.org
John told me that Dave has done Rainier, but not in winter. I had also heard from a friend that Dave was had not climbed Whitney in winter (although he had climbed it during another season). In the case of conflicting information, I would side with John who actually spoke with Dave and quizzed him at length on his highpointing feats.

Wouldn't it be neat if Dave could be a speaker at a HP convention? Not that I have any knowledge of Dave's desire to do so.....
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Mohamed Ellozy
Mohamed Ellozy

July 14th, 2003, 6:53 pm #8

I stand corrected. Agree it is still quite an accomplishment. (Does your count use a 200 foot minimum col?)

Ivan Ash
jivan@ieee.org
Ivan,

I have no interest in climbing that list, or any of the individual states, so my knowledge is second hand (I may be sane, but I hang around with others ... ).

The New England lists, which are "unofficial", were developed by members of the 4,000 footer club, so I am very close to certain that they follow the 200 foot col (or should I say prominence?) rule.

I have no idea of who developed the non-New England lists, nor whether they were developed in conjunction with the New England lists or independently. The 4,000 footers of the Northeast list (the Northeast 11 list, with 115 peaks on it) merges the New England lists (200 foot col) with the ADK list (Herb Chambers and the Marshall brothers thought they were 4,000 feet).

I am pretty sure that someone on the cohp or prominence lists could give you an authoritative answer.
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Mohamed Ellozy
Mohamed Ellozy

July 14th, 2003, 7:04 pm #9

> The 4,000 footers of the Northeast list (the Northeast 11 list, with 115 peaks on it) ...

That should be "the Northest 111 list ...".

Pity that we cannot correct our own posts ...
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Joined: August 21st, 2002, 3:11 pm

July 14th, 2003, 8:01 pm #10

I have a copy of the same list and it was developed by someone close to or on the 4000 foot committee. I was just too lazy to get it out and look and guessed way too high on the count.

The West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, Georgia and North Carolina 4000 foot lists were done by me and are posted on Americasroof. However, they were all first cuts and there are corrections. I am working on revisions to the Virginia list now.

No, I am not crazy enough to try to do them all, especially since I started in this business (peak bagging) way too late to make a big dent without being completely obsessed by the project. However, some of the people I hang out with also...

I started with the West Virginia list 2 or 3 years ago because I was working on the NH 4000 footers and was vacationing in my homestate, WV. My wife and I were on top of Spruce Knob and it started me wondering how many 4000 footers there were in West Virginia. I thought maybe 15 - 20. to my surprise there turned out to be about 173 with at least a 200 foot prominence. Anyway, I finished NH. I think we were at the same awards meeting a year or two ago. Now I am working on New England and the hundred highest, but not with any great intensity.

After I finished the WV list I got curious about the others and poured over the topos to do them. North Carolina has a rediculous number - over 700.

Anyway, they make good working lists even if no one is rabid enough to try to do them all. I might use them to do a single range such as Cheat Mountain, WV, which seems to have about 16 qualifying 4000 footers.

Also, I have learned a lot about the southeastern mountains. I have found some interesting things. For instance, Garden Mountain, VA, seems to be a remnant of a volcano or a meteor impact. It forms a complete circle with one gap where a river escapes. If anyone knows anything about that area I would be interested.

Ivan Ash
jivan@ieee.org
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