4th quarter accidents and rescues

4th quarter accidents and rescues

Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:48 am

October 9th, 2007, 9:53 pm #1

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Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:48 am

October 9th, 2007, 9:55 pm #2

In browsing last weeks NPS Morning Reports I found many accidents and deaths. One on the I-64 bridge at the New River NRA had the most famous of quotes. Enjoy.

http://home.nps.gov/applications/mornin ... ortold.cfm
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Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:48 am

October 9th, 2007, 9:56 pm #3

New River Gorge National River (WV)
Man Dies In Fall From Bridge Catwalk

Mickey Hurley, 24, of Hinton, West Virginia, fell to his death from under the I-64 bridge above the New River at Sandstone on September 29th. According to witnesses, Hurley climbed up under the bridge and went out on the steel catwalk to look at the New River. While out on the catwalk, Hurley turned to his friend and said “Hey, watch this.” He then climbed over the catwalk railing and attempted to jump down to a concrete pillar that supports the bridge. According to the friend, Hurley hit the edge of the pillar, then fell approximately 80 feet into the New River and disappeared. A local fisherman boating down the river heard the voices and saw what looked like a person falling from under the bridge. He immediately called 911. Rangers responded along with volunteers from the Hinton, Green Sulfur, and Beaver fire departments. Divers working in conjunction with boat teams found Hurley’s body submerged in about 12 feet of water near the end of the bridge pillar. The body was recovered and turned over to the Summers County coroner. Based on witness statements and Hurley’s friend’s report, alcohol was probably a contributing factor. Rangers are conducting the follow–up investigation. [Submitted by Gary Hartley, Chief Ranger]
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Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:48 am

October 15th, 2007, 2:17 pm #4

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A search for an autistic teenager

http://www.dailymail.com/story/News/200 ... ilderness/
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Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:48 am

October 16th, 2007, 3:31 am #5

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A hiker found after a miserable night.

http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_7183893
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Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:48 am

October 16th, 2007, 3:37 am #6

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Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:48 am

October 19th, 2007, 3:46 am #7

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Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:48 am

November 10th, 2007, 8:27 pm #8

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Joined: January 22nd, 2004, 5:48 am

November 10th, 2007, 8:28 pm #9

from NPS Morning Report



Grand Canyon National Park (AZ)
Plague Determined As Probable Cause Of Biologist’s Death

On November 2nd, Eric York, a 37-year-old wildlife biologist at Grand Canyon National Park, was found deceased in his residence on the South Rim. Plague has been determined as the probable cause of his death, based on preliminary laboratory tests conducted by the Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Plague is a rare, but sometimes fatal, disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. It is primarily a disease of animals, but it can be transmitted to humans through the bites of rodent fleas or by direct contact with infected animals. Though the source of his infection is not certain, York most likely became infected with plague from work-related exposures to wildlife. York’s symptoms were consistent with pneumonic plague, the most serious but least common form of plague. In rare cases, pneumonic plague can spread person to person through aerosolized respiratory droplets (e.g. coughing, sneezing). According to the CDC, transmission of plague from person to person has not been observed in the United States since 1924. Since pneumonic plague was initially suspected as a possible cause of York’s death, the National Park Service worked with the Grand Canyon Clinic to offer a seven-day course of prophylactic antibiotics to persons who had close contact (within six feet) with York while he was symptomatic. These people have been contacted and are in the process of receiving medication. Close contacts of York have also been informed to watch for symptoms consistent with plague and to seek medical attention as soon as possible if symptoms develop. Symptoms of pneumonic plague include fever, headache, chest pain, cough, and bloody saliva. Early treatment with antibiotics is essential to surviving plague. Plague is considered endemic in northern Arizona at elevations above 4,500 feet. While an average of one or two human cases of plague are reported each year in Arizona, there were no human cases reported from 2001 through 2006 in the state. Increased plague activity in Arizona was reported in 2007 to public health officials:

* one human case, who survived, was reported in Apache County;
* prairie dog colony die-offs in two separate neighborhoods in Flagstaff (Coconino County) were confirmed to be from plague; and
* a domestic pet cat from north of Prescott (Yavapai County) was also documented as infected with plague.

York had direct contact with both wild rodents and mountain lions, which put him at a higher risk for plague than other park staff and the general public. Persons living, working, or visiting areas where plague is known to be present can take the following precautions to reduce their risk of exposure:

* Do not handle sick or dead animals.
* Prevent pets from roaming loose.
* Control fleas on pets with flea collars or flea sprays routinely.
* Avoid exposure to rodent burrows and fleas and wild animals.
* Use insect repellant when visiting or working in areas where plague might be active or rodents might be present.
* Wear rubber gloves when cleaning or skinning wild animals.
* Domestic cats are susceptible to plague. Cat owners should take their ill cats to a veterinarian for evaluation.

The NPS plans to collaborate with its public health partners to assess the risk for plague and other zoonotic diseases at Grand Canyon National Park. Public health officials from the NPS, the CDC, ADHS and the Coconino County Health Department have all been instrumental in this incident. For more information, please call the Grand Canyon National Park Incident Information Center at 928-638-7922 or 928-638-7688. For additional information on plague and for tips on prevention, please visit the Centers for Disease Control Web site at http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/plague/index.htm . [Submitted by Maureen Oltrogge, Public Affairs Officer]


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Joined: August 2nd, 2001, 8:13 pm

November 18th, 2007, 10:17 pm #10

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Here is a Yosemite Search & Rescue report on a hypothermia death after climbing Cathedral Peak in Yosemite National Park.

Very pointed reminder about the need to be prepared for worse conditions than you expect. From the descriptions, it was very close to being a double fatality...
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