3 Fatalities in Avalanche on Peru's Highest Point

3 Fatalities in Avalanche on Peru's Highest Point

roger
roger

June 14th, 2002, 2:38 pm #1

LIMA, Peru (Reuters) -- Peruvian police said on Thursday they had located the bodies of three Austrian mountaineers who disappeared in an avalanche last week on Peru's highest peak, the Huascaran.
"The bodies of the three Austrians are being taken down to the camp ... that can be reached by donkeys and helicopters. Due to bad weather, they will be taken early tomorrow by helicopter to Yungay, and then to Lima," Marisela Caferatta, spokeswoman for the police High Mountain Rescue Unit, told Reuters.
Three Austrians and one German, who were roped together with a fifth person as they neared the summit of the 22,205-foot (6,768-meter) mountain, were swept down 985 feet (300 meters) by an avalanche on Monday of last week. The fifth Austrian climber was rescued after miraculously falling onto a small plateau.
The Huascaran is a popular destination for mountaineers and tourists but is considered a risky climb for its high avalanche danger. The massive snow-capped peak is the crowning glory of Peru's Cordillera Blanca.
http://europe.cnn.com/2002/WORLD/americ ... index.html

More pages on Huascaran
http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=n ... =Huascaran
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R White
R White

July 2nd, 2002, 12:02 am #2

I am currently hiking and climbing in Huaraz. Several days ago three Americans were killed on Huascaran in an ice fall near camp 2. Details on the accident are few at the moment. Conditions on the mountain have been unstable for at least several weeks now.

By the way, the photo above is of Alpamayo from, I believe, the SE, showing the Ferrari Route.
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roger
roger

July 11th, 2002, 6:46 pm #3

LIMA, Peru, (Reuters) -- Police recovered the body of a Czech mountaineer, the ninth climber to perish this year on Peru's glaciated peaks, and were investigating reports on Monday that three Danish climbers have died.
The climbing season in Peru's Andes, which boast the world's highest tropical mountain range and which draws adventurers from all over the world, typically stretches from mid-April until the end of September.
Garate said that more snow than usual and colder conditions this year could be behind the nine deaths this season.
http://europe.cnn.com/2002/WORLD/americ ... index.html

On the Earlier climb (posted June 28):
LIMA, Peru (June 28, 2002 6:52 a.m. EDT) - Rescuers said Thursday they found the body of an American mountain climber caught in an avalanche and buried in a 200-foot crevasse on Peru's highest peak.

Searchers were still looking for the bodies of two other Americans who vanished Monday in the avalanche on Huascaran mountain, said Luis Garate, head of Peru's high-mountain rescue unit.
Huascaran, which soars to 22,334 feet, attracts climbers from around the world.

Three Austrian men and one German were killed in an avalanche on the towering peak on June 3.


http://europe.cnn.com/2002/WORLD/americ ... index.html


The El Niño phenomenon takes place every few years when temperatures in the Pacific rise above normal, having a major effect on weather patterns in South America. The last El Niño in 1997 brought unseasonal snow to the Andes and had a big impact on the nature of big snow and ice routes in the following years.
The approach to the classic peak of Alpamayo in Peru, for example, went from being a straighforward steep snow climb to a precarious passage through a series of crevasses and seracs after heavy rain apparently carved its way through the glacier.
http://www.outdoorsmagic.com/news/article.asp?UAN=1486

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WingLady
WingLady

July 12th, 2002, 3:46 pm #4

EL NIÑO MAKES ITS OFFICIAL RETURN, NOAA REPORTS

July 11, 2002 — It's now official: El Niño is back. It's not the powerful, climatic juggernaut of 1997-98, but a milder, weaker version that may begin affecting weather in the United States by Fall 2002, according to NOAA's National Weather Service.

http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories/s938.htm
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Roger Williams
Roger Williams

July 13th, 2002, 3:09 am #5

LIMA, Peru, (Reuters) -- Police recovered the body of a Czech mountaineer, the ninth climber to perish this year on Peru's glaciated peaks, and were investigating reports on Monday that three Danish climbers have died.
The climbing season in Peru's Andes, which boast the world's highest tropical mountain range and which draws adventurers from all over the world, typically stretches from mid-April until the end of September.
Garate said that more snow than usual and colder conditions this year could be behind the nine deaths this season.
http://europe.cnn.com/2002/WORLD/americ ... index.html

On the Earlier climb (posted June 28):
LIMA, Peru (June 28, 2002 6:52 a.m. EDT) - Rescuers said Thursday they found the body of an American mountain climber caught in an avalanche and buried in a 200-foot crevasse on Peru's highest peak.

Searchers were still looking for the bodies of two other Americans who vanished Monday in the avalanche on Huascaran mountain, said Luis Garate, head of Peru's high-mountain rescue unit.
Huascaran, which soars to 22,334 feet, attracts climbers from around the world.

Three Austrian men and one German were killed in an avalanche on the towering peak on June 3.


http://europe.cnn.com/2002/WORLD/americ ... index.html


The El Niño phenomenon takes place every few years when temperatures in the Pacific rise above normal, having a major effect on weather patterns in South America. The last El Niño in 1997 brought unseasonal snow to the Andes and had a big impact on the nature of big snow and ice routes in the following years.
The approach to the classic peak of Alpamayo in Peru, for example, went from being a straighforward steep snow climb to a precarious passage through a series of crevasses and seracs after heavy rain apparently carved its way through the glacier.
http://www.outdoorsmagic.com/news/article.asp?UAN=1486
The article above in the thread (which shows one ice pyramid; it's a double-header, I wonder if the other summit is behind) and other sources give Nevado Huascaran's height as 6768 m. (22 204'). Your height converts to 6807 m. Oh well, a difference of opinion of 39 m. (130') isn't to be wondered at in S. America. 6th highest in the Andes, the peak is only 153 or 192 m. short of Cerro Aconcagua, at 6960 m. its HP so one of the Top 7.
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