24 Hour Record Rules?

24 Hour Record Rules?

Joined: January 23rd, 2006, 5:44 am

January 23rd, 2006, 5:46 am #1

Are there official rules I should know before attempting to break the "Most State Highpoints in 24 Hours" record?
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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 3:15 pm

January 23rd, 2006, 5:43 pm #2

For HP records, there's only one general rule - be safe - which includes "don't break laws" and "be courteous on the trail." I received one report that someone was racing along the trail and nearly ran over another person. This is not good behavior.

Regarding specific rules, I've never seen any in print and there don't seem to be any set rules other than be safe and courteous.

The HP Club certainly does not keep rules, nor does it officially or formally track records. The records you see in the Club Directory are those that were tracked by Jakk and others and some new ones that I keep up to date as best I can. I do not claim they are accurate and I make no attempt to verify them.

I publish them because I get so many requests for them; it is easier to just put them out on the table for all to see. It is done solely for amusement.

That all being said, I assume that the "24 Hour Rule" is simply to count the number of highpoints you are on in any consecutive 24 hour period. Claims are based on the honor system.
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 5:18 am

January 23rd, 2006, 11:30 pm #3

I believe it is also required that you try to have fun.
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Joined: January 26th, 2004, 6:29 pm

January 24th, 2006, 8:43 pm #4

And, of course, the tried and true "Reaching the summit is optional, getting down is mandatory."
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Joined: January 23rd, 2006, 5:44 am

January 25th, 2006, 6:43 am #5

I appreciate the input, folks. And fun is a definite. I'm thinking about trying sometime in mid-May. Thanks.
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Joined: January 25th, 2006, 8:25 pm

January 25th, 2006, 9:42 pm #6

Are there official rules I should know before attempting to break the "Most State Highpoints in 24 Hours" record?
Hi Clif, In 1991, when 5 of us set out to break the 48 state speed record, I wrote to Guinness Book of World Records to establish criterion in case someone wanted to break the record we hoped to set. My intention was to create a standard set of rules, so if others wanted to break the record they would have to do so in the same way and not be able to break the record by flying a helicopter from highpoint to highpoint or use ATV's. Listed below are most of the rules Guinness Book of Records agreed needed to be in place for future record attempts:
1) Only individuals who start with the original climbing group are allowed to drive. In other words, you can't pick up fresh drivers along the way. However, the driver(s) could be nonclimbers, as long as they were with the team from the beginning and not picked up during the record attempt.
2) The "offical" stop watch is to be started at the summit of the first highpoint and the watch is stopped at the summit of the last high point. This is an extremely important rule for the 50 state record since it allows a team to begin their record attempt on the summit of Denali and does not have to include all the ascent time!
3) All members of the climbing team must reach the summit of each highpoint in order to be included in the record. If someone on the team is sick or injuried, they can keep assisting the team with driving or errands (washing clothes, shopping, vehicular maintenance etc.), but they cannot be included in the list of actual record setters. That is assuming, of course that the sick or injuried team member indeed started from the beginning of the record attempt. If not, then it is illegal to use their help.
4) All traffic laws MUST be obeyed. No speeding, running stop signs or traffic lights etc.
5) All wilderness hiking, climbing and camping etiquette must be followed. Examples: You can't cut switchbacks on trails or abuse accepted camping practices in order to save time.
6) Vehicles can be driven as close to the summit of any high point as long as it is done on established roads that any ordinary passenger car can travel. The use of 4 wheel drive vehicles or ATVs off road or on nonstandard summit roads is not allowed.
This includes the most important rules that I can remember, of course, as the Club has stated, they are not verifing the record claims. They only post them. Every team probably has their own idea as to what is fair or legal. The most recent record of the 48 & 50 state highpoints did not follow all of the above standards that we set, but I feel thair record is still valid. It would be nice if everyone would agree on a standard set of rules, but records of this sort are governed by a lot of individuality, time restraints and, of course, TRUST.
I hope this helps! Good Luck!! Dennis Stewart
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Joined: September 2nd, 2004, 6:03 pm

January 25th, 2006, 9:54 pm #7

Are there official rules I should know before attempting to break the "Most State Highpoints in 24 Hours" record?
Ultramarathoner Buzz Burrell came up with a few basic rules for setting records. These are more sportsmanship rules than technical prohibitions.

Announce your intentions in advance. Like a true gentleman, pay your respects to those who came before you, and tell them what you intend to attempt and when.

Be an open book. Invite anyone to come and watch or, better yet, participate. This makes your effort more fun and any result more believable.

Record your event. Write down everything immediately upon completion. Memory doesn't count.
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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 3:15 pm

January 29th, 2006, 8:45 pm #8

Hi Clif, In 1991, when 5 of us set out to break the 48 state speed record, I wrote to Guinness Book of World Records to establish criterion in case someone wanted to break the record we hoped to set. My intention was to create a standard set of rules, so if others wanted to break the record they would have to do so in the same way and not be able to break the record by flying a helicopter from highpoint to highpoint or use ATV's. Listed below are most of the rules Guinness Book of Records agreed needed to be in place for future record attempts:
1) Only individuals who start with the original climbing group are allowed to drive. In other words, you can't pick up fresh drivers along the way. However, the driver(s) could be nonclimbers, as long as they were with the team from the beginning and not picked up during the record attempt.
2) The "offical" stop watch is to be started at the summit of the first highpoint and the watch is stopped at the summit of the last high point. This is an extremely important rule for the 50 state record since it allows a team to begin their record attempt on the summit of Denali and does not have to include all the ascent time!
3) All members of the climbing team must reach the summit of each highpoint in order to be included in the record. If someone on the team is sick or injuried, they can keep assisting the team with driving or errands (washing clothes, shopping, vehicular maintenance etc.), but they cannot be included in the list of actual record setters. That is assuming, of course that the sick or injuried team member indeed started from the beginning of the record attempt. If not, then it is illegal to use their help.
4) All traffic laws MUST be obeyed. No speeding, running stop signs or traffic lights etc.
5) All wilderness hiking, climbing and camping etiquette must be followed. Examples: You can't cut switchbacks on trails or abuse accepted camping practices in order to save time.
6) Vehicles can be driven as close to the summit of any high point as long as it is done on established roads that any ordinary passenger car can travel. The use of 4 wheel drive vehicles or ATVs off road or on nonstandard summit roads is not allowed.
This includes the most important rules that I can remember, of course, as the Club has stated, they are not verifing the record claims. They only post them. Every team probably has their own idea as to what is fair or legal. The most recent record of the 48 & 50 state highpoints did not follow all of the above standards that we set, but I feel thair record is still valid. It would be nice if everyone would agree on a standard set of rules, but records of this sort are governed by a lot of individuality, time restraints and, of course, TRUST.
I hope this helps! Good Luck!! Dennis Stewart
Thank you Dennis for publishing this important bit of information related to your historic visit of the 48. It would be nice if folks followed similar rules, and folks in the future may do so. In the meantime, I'll try to note what set of rules were used. If someone does the Lower 48 in 10 days using a helicopter I'll note it as such. I would assume that only the nearest legal landing spots are used, just as I assume that no speeding occurs during car attempts, no driving sleepy, no switchback cutting, etc.

Age records pose similar problems. So far we have not counted in-the-womb summits, although we have a front-runner in that category (see current issue).

Who wants to step forward and provide a count for "dragging a resistant spouse along?"
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Joined: January 31st, 2006, 6:01 am

January 31st, 2006, 6:26 am #9

Hi Clif, In 1991, when 5 of us set out to break the 48 state speed record, I wrote to Guinness Book of World Records to establish criterion in case someone wanted to break the record we hoped to set. My intention was to create a standard set of rules, so if others wanted to break the record they would have to do so in the same way and not be able to break the record by flying a helicopter from highpoint to highpoint or use ATV's. Listed below are most of the rules Guinness Book of Records agreed needed to be in place for future record attempts:
1) Only individuals who start with the original climbing group are allowed to drive. In other words, you can't pick up fresh drivers along the way. However, the driver(s) could be nonclimbers, as long as they were with the team from the beginning and not picked up during the record attempt.
2) The "offical" stop watch is to be started at the summit of the first highpoint and the watch is stopped at the summit of the last high point. This is an extremely important rule for the 50 state record since it allows a team to begin their record attempt on the summit of Denali and does not have to include all the ascent time!
3) All members of the climbing team must reach the summit of each highpoint in order to be included in the record. If someone on the team is sick or injuried, they can keep assisting the team with driving or errands (washing clothes, shopping, vehicular maintenance etc.), but they cannot be included in the list of actual record setters. That is assuming, of course that the sick or injuried team member indeed started from the beginning of the record attempt. If not, then it is illegal to use their help.
4) All traffic laws MUST be obeyed. No speeding, running stop signs or traffic lights etc.
5) All wilderness hiking, climbing and camping etiquette must be followed. Examples: You can't cut switchbacks on trails or abuse accepted camping practices in order to save time.
6) Vehicles can be driven as close to the summit of any high point as long as it is done on established roads that any ordinary passenger car can travel. The use of 4 wheel drive vehicles or ATVs off road or on nonstandard summit roads is not allowed.
This includes the most important rules that I can remember, of course, as the Club has stated, they are not verifing the record claims. They only post them. Every team probably has their own idea as to what is fair or legal. The most recent record of the 48 & 50 state highpoints did not follow all of the above standards that we set, but I feel thair record is still valid. It would be nice if everyone would agree on a standard set of rules, but records of this sort are governed by a lot of individuality, time restraints and, of course, TRUST.
I hope this helps! Good Luck!! Dennis Stewart
Several things:

For completeness, I think it should be added that the Guinness Book of World Records no longer recognizes any records involving vehicular (car/truck) travel over public roads.

With that said, ever since I started looking into the subject, I have always regarded the Highpoint Hoppers trip as the greatest feat in highpointing history, and Dennis Stewart is THE man to lionize for the triumph.

BUT I have to add that traveling tens of thousands of miles without ever going over the speed limit sounds like a recipe for insanity and a little incredible unless Herculean efforts were made.

Finally, I think the Highpointers Club should step up to the plate and recognize records. After all, if not this club, then who, now that Guinness is out? After all, the club recognizes completers; I don't think it's much of a stretch.

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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 3:15 pm

January 31st, 2006, 4:52 pm #10

Agreed, re Dennis and his group!

As for records, the HP Club recognizes records in essentially the same manner as we do Completers. If you send it to us, we'll believe it.

The main mission of the Club is to facilitate communication and provide a forum for discussion.

Too much to do. Too little time. Anyone wishing to assume command over the HP Records can do so. Please contact me. Your responsibility will be to provide an annual update for the Club Directory and send me interesting articles or updates from time to time. Or...?

Those wishing to claim a record or those inventing a new record, should send me their information at newsletter@highpointers.org (or my personal email) (or use the Golden PO Box).
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