2004 Obituaries

2004 Obituaries

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January 14th, 2004, 4:46 am #1

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January 14th, 2004, 4:49 am #2

Arne Naess (born Dec 8, 1937) summited Everest in 1985, leading one of the must successful Everest expeditions ever. No less than 17 expedition members made the summit, from the South Col SE ridge. The expedition was famous for being very well organized, and included some well known names such as Ang Rita Sherpa (his then 3d summit), Dick Bass (who later coined the idea of the "seven summits"), Imax filmer David Breashears, and Chris Bonington (expedition "Captain"). Arne was the nephew of the famous pioneer and philosopher Arne Naess sr., who in 1950 led the expedition that made the first ascent of Tirich Mir, Pakistan (7706 m).

Arne Naess made a fortune in shipping and married singer Diana Ross in 1986. They had 2 children and divorced in 1999. Arne then married Camilla Astrup, and had 2 kids with her. Arne had in total 7 children. He died 66 years old, the way that he had lived - climbing a mountain.
http://www.mounteverest.net/story/Evere ... 2004.shtml

The accident report in South Africa:
http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/mes ... 1074053039
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January 15th, 2004, 11:36 pm #3

GLENDALE, Calif. - Asher I. "Dick" Kelty, whose innovative design of lightweight backpacks with external frames and waist straps made his brand of packs popular with many hikers, has died. He was 84.
Kelty died of congestive heart failure at home on Monday, said his wife of 57 years, Nena.
Born in Duluth, Minn., Kelty moved to Glendale in 1922. He worked for Lockheed Overseas Corp in England, joined the Navy, and later worked as a carpenter in Southern California.
An avid hiker and camper in the Sierra Nevada mountains, Kelty launched his now well-known brand of backpacks out of his home in 1952.
Kelty Pack was sold to Boston-based CML Group in 1972, and is now owned by Colorado-based American Recreation Products Inc.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercuryn ... 717569.htm
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January 18th, 2004, 12:19 am #4

Kenneth Holmes’ life ended in the New Hampshire mountains he knew well but ultimately could not conquer.
The 37-year-old father of five, who taught his children a love and appreciation of the outdoors, and New Hampshire state park worker who spent time rescuing other hikers, died after spending several days camping in the White Mountains.
His body was found Thursday in the White Mountains near Franconia Notch, deep in the woods surrounded by some of the region’s toughest terrain. Holmes was located in a highly exposed area not far from his loaded backpack in an area where several peaks tower above 4,000 feet.
Although he was well-equipped with gear - including a tent and portable cooking stove - Holmes encountered arctic air that approached 44 below zero and a wind chill that plunged the temps toward minus 100.
Sometimes even with the best gear, "it’s not always going to cut it," said Lt. Robert Bryant of the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department. Still, those who knew the Athol, Mass., resident - a ranger at Mount Monadnock State Park in southern New Hampshire - said they weren’t surprised that Holmes decided to brave the elements.
"For people who go out in these extreme conditions, there’s a drive that’s very difficult to understand," said Don Davis, a regional supervisor for New Hampshire’s Division of Parks and Recreation who knew Holmes. "It compels them to move on and go out into the elements. It’s part of their lifestyle."
Fish and game officials said Holmes was last heard from Tuesday night, when he called a friend from his cell phone and said he was camping near the summit of Mt. Bond in the Pemigewasset wilderness. The friend helped Holmes figure out two routes down from the mountain, and didn’t think Holmes was in trouble, authorities said.
Since he was hired last year to work at the 3,165-foot Mount Monadnock, Holmes was always up for whatever the job had in store: collecting money from campers, rescuing lost hikers or patrolling one of the world’s most-climbed mountains.
"His time working at the park wasn’t just a job to bring in money," Davis said. "It was part of him. It was an extension of himself. He was a mountaineer, and this is what he wanted to be."
http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/0117 ... /70937.htm

The accident report:
http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/mes ... 1074225200
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Jack
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January 19th, 2004, 4:42 pm #5

When the radio announcers were talking about "One person died while camping in the White Mountains." I thought that it probably wasn't some novice, since conditions were pretty rough even before they got deadly. It is a good reminder that just because we have experience and technical equipment there are some conditions that are at or beyond our survival ability.

If anyone has detailed info on this tragic death, please post it here.
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WingLady
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January 20th, 2004, 12:01 am #6

I just found out that Jack Durrance passed away last month. Durrance was best known for his dramatic rescue climb of Devil's Tower (the "Durrance" route is one of the most famous climbs of the tower -- I've climbed it twice) and a controversial and failed attempt to climb K2 in 1939 with Fritz Wiessner.

Jack and his famous skiing brother, Dick, were some of the earliest "extreme" skiers, descending difficult gullys in Tuckerman's Ravine.

http://www.camp4.com/index.php?newsid=514
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 2nd, 2004, 3:51 am #7

The accident report is available here:

http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/mes ... 1075693700

Jeffrey was that, but much more: A graduate of the University of Vermont, a trained wild lands firefighter, an accomplished mountaineer, a first-rate skier, a friend to many in Girdwood, he was also the man who designed and operated the avalanche Web site run by the Chugach National Forest.

That Web site is now out of order.

"Due to a tragic accident on the Glacier Ranger District on Thursday, Jan. 22, the Chugach National Forest Avalanche Center will not be posting advisories until the end of the month,'' the site says. "The Forest Service, the Avalanche Center, friends and family lost Jeff Nissman when a roof avalanched on him Thursday in Portage Valley.

"Jeff had worked for the Forest Service eight years, four of them here on the Glacier Ranger District. Before that he was in Juneau on the Tongass National Forest. Jeff was a key part of the Avalanche Center and the Cabins and Trails program. We were ... looking forward to his cheerful voice bringing us the morning avalanche advisories in the near future."

http://www.adn.com/outdoors/story/46943 ... 5713c.html
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

March 6th, 2004, 12:24 am #8

SEATTLE -- Dorothy Cole, who went from singing for diners on Mount Rainier to an opera career as a Valkyrie, witch, goddess and dozens of other supporting roles with leading companies, is dead at 71.
Cole, best known for her performances in works by Richard Wagner, died Sunday of congestive heart failure, relatives and professional associates said.
A mezzo soprano, she performed at San Francisco Opera and other major companies, toured with Luciano Pavarotti and Joan Sutherland and sang supporting roles in a number of recordings, including Sutherland's "Live in Australia 1965."
One of Cole's early jobs was at the Paradise Inn in Mount Rainier National Park, accompanied by future Seattle Opera colleague Gordon Grant as Everest climbers-to-be Jim and Lou Whittaker rappelled from the ceiling during "Climb Ev'ry Mountain."
http://www.heraldnet.com/Stories/04/3/4/18286310.cfm
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

March 15th, 2004, 8:55 pm #9

A pioneering Adirondacks climber and the first female member and former president of the 46-er's Climbing Club has died.
Grace Hudowalski -- who climbed all 46 major Adirondack peaks at least twice -- died Saturday at the age of 98.
Hudowalski was called "Amazing Grace" by her friends, and climbed her first mountain and the state's highest peak, Mount Marcy, with a camp group in 1922 when she was 15.
http://www.thechamplainchannel.com/news ... etail.html

She was discussed on the forum:
http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/mes ... 1079384080
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 5:18 am

March 16th, 2004, 2:59 pm #10

Anyone familiar with the Adirondack hiking scene knows what a true legend Grace Hudowalski was. For decades, she was not only 46R Club President but literally defined what the 46Rs were all about. In the last couple of years, a movement to rename East Dix (one of the Adirondack 4000 foot peaks) has steadily gained momentum. A growing number of hikers already refer to this mountain as 'Grace Peak' although the USGS has not yet recognized the new name. For all 46Rs, the news of her passing is sad indeed.
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