2004 Climbing Book Reviews and Author Interviews

Joined: February 4th, 2004, 2:58 pm

August 14th, 2004, 4:45 pm #11

"Wings over Denali" was Charlie's team name when he organized and led a climb in 1984.

Explanation of the team flag: "Wings" is Charlie's nickname
Fourteen: approximate number of miles from base to summit
Twenty: approximate elevation in thousands of feet at the summit




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D Winger
http://www.HighpointAdventures.com
http://www.GreatSandDunes.info
http://www.JoshuaTreeTrad.com
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 28th, 2004, 5:13 pm #12

I will post books reviews and author interviews for 2004 here.

The 2003 list is available here:
http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/mes ... 1047145382
Hikers, campers, fishermen and anyone else who want to make the trek to the highlands of western North Carolina and Tennessee have a new aid to help them find just the right hike and know what to expect when they get there. A revised new edition of "Day & Overnight Hikes: Great Smoky Mountains National Park" can point them to the beauty and solitude that can found in the less traveled areas of the park.

Author Johnny Molloy hiked hundreds of miles to gather information on 31 day hikes and 10 overnight treks that rank among the best in the park. Hikers can choose from out-and-back hikes like Sutton Ridge, loop day hikes such as Smokemont, or overnight loops to places like Mount Sterling.

Each trail profile offers commentary on what to expect along the way and rates each hike for things like scenery, difficulty, solitude and other factors. Detailed trail maps, elevation profiles and clear directions make the guide user-friendly, but still leave plenty for the hiker to discover on his own.

While it is impossible to verify how complete and correct any trail guide is without visiting each area mentioned, you can spot-check by examining the notes on familiar places.

For example, in describing the Mount Sterling Overnight Loop, Molloy points out that the Walnut Bottoms backcountry campsite "is popular among both hikers and bears."
http://www.newbernsj.com/SiteProcessor. ... ion=Sports


I can't find the listing of a new book on Amazon. There's a 2001 book listed.

But here's a list of Malloy's books:

http://xml-na.amznxslt.com/onca/xml3?t= ... /store.xsl
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 6th, 2005, 3:27 am #13

I will post books reviews and author interviews for 2004 here.

The 2003 list is available here:
http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/mes ... 1047145382
The New York Times in reviewing Jennifer Jordan’s book about the first five women who climbed K2 (and had unhappy ends) notes the women also had unhappy lifes. The book is entitled “Savage Summit : The True Stories of the First Five Women Who Climbed K2, the World’s Most Feared Mountain.” For instance there’s Wanda Rutkiewicz who climbed 8 of the world’s 14 peak over 8,00 meters. She had three husbands, few friends and fellow climbers stole her sleeping bag on Everest and her fellow male climbers claimed she never summited Annapurna until she produced the pictures to prove it. Chantal Mauduit was derided for using sherpas –which most climbers use. There was Alison Hargreaves who is believed to have perished on K2 as an attempt to safe her flagging fortunes. There other woman are Julie Tullis and Liliane Barrard
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 12th, 2005, 6:01 pm #14

I will post books reviews and author interviews for 2004 here.

The 2003 list is available here:
http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/mes ... 1047145382

Rainier Climbing Ranger Mike Gauthier is embarking on a national book tour to celebrate the second edition of his famous “Rainier Climbing Guide.” The new edition has quite a bit of additional information on: Training, Guiding, Glaciers, History, Biographies and over 60 new
images, many of which are aerial.

The April edition of Seattle Magazine kicked things off with a lengthy piece. The Los Angeles Times ran an article on April 12 with many of Mike’s own pictures.

The Los Angeles Times article may well be one of the best profiles ever written on Gauthier (dubbed Gator by friends) as it traces Gauthier’s transformation in 1995 from just a seasonal ranger to the climbing ranger. The cause for the transformation was when two fellow rangers were killed on the mountain and Gauthier saw how unprepared they were with their crampoons duct taped on. Gauthier revamped rescue operations at Mt. Rainier by insisting that team members be climbers first, rangers second. He’s become a part of local lore for his ability to fish the fallen out of crevasses and lead the stranded out of harm’s way.

The article notes “The deadliest common denominator for Mt. Rainier climbers is the Muir snowfield below Camp Muir at 10,400 feet. The snow consistency varies with exposure to the sun. An easy glissade in soft snow becomes uncontrollable in icier, shaded spots.”
Gautheir said the choice of a partner is the most important decision you make on Rainier.

“Fitness is a huge factor,” Gauthier says. Many climbers “like to blame weather, glaciers and other things, but people who are generally strong still will push on to the summit.”

The associated text box notes:

There are about 40 routes up Washington’s high point. Last year, 4,951 climbers made it to the top.

First climbed: 1870, Hazard Stevens, Philemon Beecher Van Trump (John Muir summitted in 1888)

The book tour schedule:
Book tour dates and locations

RENO, NV
April 19, Tuesday
Time: 12:30 p.m.

Place: Patagonia, 8550 White Fir Street Reno, NV

Event: Slide show followed by Q&A and book signing
Admission: Private

Contact: Mike Colpo: 888-500-0046

April 21, Thursday

Time: 7:00 p.m.

Place: REI, 2225 Harvard Way, Reno, NV

Event: Slide show followed by Q&A and book signing
Admission: Free

Contact: 775-828-9090

Tacoma, WA
May 3, Tuesday
Time: 7:00 p.m.

Place: Mountaineers Club-Tacoma Branch, 2302 N 30th St, Tacoma, WA

Event: Slide show followed by Q&A and book signing
Admission: Free

Contact: Dan Lauren, Climbing Chair, Tacoma Mountaineers,
dan.lauren@weyerhaeuser.com, or 253-924-3309

Olympia, WA
May 4, Wednesday
Time: 7:00 p.m.

Place: Alpine Experience, 408 Olympia Ave. N.E., Olympia, WA

Event: Slide show followed by Q&A and book signing
Admission: Free

Contact: Dave Sandford, 360-956-1699 or dave@alpinex.com

Hillsboro, OR
May 10, Tuesday
Time: 7:00 p.m.

Place: REI, 2235 NW Allie Avenue (NW 194th at Cornell), Hillsboro, OR

Event: Slide show followed by Q&A and book signing
Admission: Free

Contact: Janet Schmidt, jschmid@rei.com or 503-283-1300

PORTLAND, OR
May 11, Wednesday
Time: 7:00 p.m.

Place: REI, 1405 NW Johnson St., Portland, OR

Event: Slide show followed by Q&A and book signing
Admission: Free

Contact: Janet Schmidt, jschmid@rei.com or 503-283-1300

SEATTLE, WA
May 12, Thursday
Time: 12:30 to 2:00 p.m. presentation

Place: Microsoft, 11/1021 Research Lecture Room, Redmond, WA

Event: Slide show followed by Q&A and book signing
Admission: Free

Contact: Lynn Finnel, lynnf@microsoft.com

BREMERTON, WA
May 12, Thursday
Time: 7:00 p.m.

Place: Olympic Mountaineers, Kitsap Cabin

Event: Slide show followed by Q&A and book signing
Admission: Free

Contact: Kate Kuhlman kate@greatpeninsula.org or Kathy Parker
parker.katherine@epa.gov

SEATTLE, WA
May 18, Wednesday
Time: 7:00 p.m. refreshments and book signing

8:00 p.m. presentation

Place: Feathered Friends, 119 Yale Avenue North, Seattle, WA

Event: Slide show followed by Q&A and book signing
Admission: $6

Contact: Jeff Greiner, Feathered Friends, jeff@featheredfriends.com or
206-292-2210

BERKELEY, CA
May 24, Tuesday
Time: 7:00 p.m.

Place: REI, 1338 San Pablo Ave. (near Gilman), Berkeley, CA

Event: Slide show followed by Q&A and book signing
Admission: Free

Contact: Polly Bolling, REI, 510-527-4140 or pbollin@rei.com

SAN JOSE, CA
May 25, Wednesday
Time: 7:00 p.m.

Place: REI, 400 El Paseo de Saratoga, San Jose, CA

Event: Slide show followed by Q&A and book signing
Admission: Free

Contact: Polly Bolling, REI, 510-527-4140 or pbollin@rei.com

RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CA
May 31, Tuesday
Time: 7:00 p.m.

Place: REI, 12218 Foothill Blvd, Rancho Cucamonga, CA

Event: Slide show followed by Q&A and book signing
Admission: Free

Contact: REI, 909-646-8360

Manhattan Beach, CA
Wednesday, June 1
Time: 7:00 p.m.

Place: REI, 1800 Rosecrans Ave Ste E., Manhattan Beach, CA

Event: Slide show followed by Q&A and book signing
Admission: Free

Contact: REI, 310-727-0728

Santa Ana, CA
Thursday, June 2
Time: 7:00 p.m.

Place: REI, 1411 Village Way (McFadden Place), Santa Ana, CA

Event: Slide show followed by Q&A and book signing
Admission: Free

Contact: REI, 714-543-4142

VENTURA, CA
TBA: Either June 1, 2, or 3.

Time: 12:30 p.m.

Place: Patagonia, 259 W. Santa Clara Dr. Ventura, CA

Event: Slide show followed by Q&A and book signing
Admission: Private

Contact: Andy Marker, 805-667-4828 direct andy_marker@patagonia.com

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 31st, 2005, 5:00 am #15

I will post books reviews and author interviews for 2004 here.

The 2003 list is available here:
http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/mes ... 1047145382

The Democrat Chronicle reports Carol White wrote a book entitled “Women With Altitude: Challenging the Adirondack High Peaks in Winter (North Country Books, $19.95).

White wrote the book, due out in November, after becoming the 20th woman Winter 46er in 1997.

A Winter 46er is a person who has climbed all 46 4,000-foot mountains in the Adirondacks during the winter months (Dec. 21 to March 21). After last winter, there were 313 Winter 46ers, including 50 women.

Women With Altitude tells the stories of 33 of the 36 women who became Winter 46ers during the canister era. Summit canisters, where climbers signed a register, were removed in late spring 2001.
http://americasroof.com/wp/archives/200 ... -in-winter/
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 1st, 2005, 5:07 pm #16

I will post books reviews and author interviews for 2004 here.

The 2003 list is available here:
http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/mes ... 1047145382

The Town Times reports The Connecticut Forest and Park Association (CFPA) has released 19th edition of the Connecticut Walk Book. One of two volumes, the first to appear on the shelves is the Walk Book East covering all the trails in eastern and central Connecticut.

The arrival of the book comes on the heels of the 75th anniversary of the Blue-Blazed Hiking Trails, a network of over 800 miles of trails that blanket the state.

Open to the public and free of charge, the Blue-Blazed Hiking Trail System has been operated and maintained by CFPA as a public service since 1929. The trails boast historic sites, breathtaking views and a variety of terrain from easy to challenging.

A volunteer corps of several hundred trail maintainers ensure that the trails are kept open and well marked. Most residents in eastern Connecticut will find a Blue Trail within 20 minutes of their home.

Edited by Ann Colson and Cindi Pietrzyk, the new edition is a departure from earlier versions, with easier-to-read two-color maps accompanied by informative historical, botanical and archeological explanations for sites along the trails. Its three-ring binder format enables users to remove the maps for convenience.

The maps are the result of a three-year odyssey for volunteers equipped with global positioning units who traversed all 800 miles of trails collecting data. The first Walk Book was published by the association in 1937.

The Connecticut Forest and Park Association is a private, non-profit, membership organization founded in 1895 to conserve the land, trails and natural resources of Connecticut through education, advocacy and stewardship. The 800-mile Blue-Blazed Hiking Trail System was founded and is maintained by the association as a free public service for all.
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Joined: November 25th, 2000, 10:31 pm

November 1st, 2005, 6:04 pm #17


The Democrat Chronicle reports Carol White wrote a book entitled “Women With Altitude: Challenging the Adirondack High Peaks in Winter (North Country Books, $19.95).

White wrote the book, due out in November, after becoming the 20th woman Winter 46er in 1997.

A Winter 46er is a person who has climbed all 46 4,000-foot mountains in the Adirondacks during the winter months (Dec. 21 to March 21). After last winter, there were 313 Winter 46ers, including 50 women.

Women With Altitude tells the stories of 33 of the 36 women who became Winter 46ers during the canister era. Summit canisters, where climbers signed a register, were removed in late spring 2001.
http://americasroof.com/wp/archives/200 ... -in-winter/
Why were the canisters removed?
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Joined: January 20th, 2004, 5:18 am

November 2nd, 2005, 2:04 am #18

The cannisters were part of Adirondack 46R lore and were part of the 46R experience until just a few years ago (circa 2000). It was at that point that a joint State DEC/46R Club effort was undertaken under the banner of "land use management." The major result of this was the consolidation of the multitude of herd paths to the trailless summits into one main path (not officially labelled a trail) to the the summit of each peak. The cannisters were originally put in place when the summits were much more difficult to find as a way of signing through to prove you were there. With the herd path consolidation, it was determined that such cannisters weren't really necessary anymore so they were replaced with simple wooden signs.

Notably, the cannisters still remain in place on the trailless Catskill 3500 club peaks, which receive much less use and often require bushwhacking skills to reach.

46R #3593
Catskill 3500 Club #1230
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