1-5 Rating System for Snow Storms

1-5 Rating System for Snow Storms

roger
roger

January 9th, 2002, 3:40 pm #1

This article is not quite highpointing but it's interesting since we're all snow freaks.

File it in the "this is so obvious why didn't I think of it" box.
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Gregory A. Zielinski, Maine state climatologist and an associate research professor in the University of Maine Institute for Quaternary and Climate Studies, has developed a way to help weather forecasters and the public understand the likely impacts of winter storms. He describes the basis for his system in the cover story of the January issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS).


"We have classification schemes for tornadoes and hurricanes," he says. "Why not for winter storms? If you look at the category and predicted path of a developing storm, you can go to the past and find that we had a similar storm so many years ago and that this was how it developed. Such a direct comparison might be helpful for the general public."


http://www.earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Ne ... 76823.html
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Here's his page:
http://www.ume.maine.edu/iceage/people/zielinski.html




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John H
John H

January 9th, 2002, 6:58 pm #2

.
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roger
roger

January 9th, 2002, 7:42 pm #3

I couldn't resist...

Here's a photo of my dogs at Niagra Falls during the big Christmas snow (there's "only" two feet on the ground in this shot).

The trip gave the two young pups a new state highpoint -- New Jersey (nothing much to report except that has been earlier noted the scaffolding is down and the place will look very nice when it hosts the 2005 Highpointers Convention).

The dog's page:
http://americasroof.com/dogs/

I haven't posted Zephyr's Utah or the pups Jersey/more snow photos yet.
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roger
roger

February 20th, 2002, 7:07 pm #4

This article is not quite highpointing but it's interesting since we're all snow freaks.

File it in the "this is so obvious why didn't I think of it" box.
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Gregory A. Zielinski, Maine state climatologist and an associate research professor in the University of Maine Institute for Quaternary and Climate Studies, has developed a way to help weather forecasters and the public understand the likely impacts of winter storms. He describes the basis for his system in the cover story of the January issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS).


"We have classification schemes for tornadoes and hurricanes," he says. "Why not for winter storms? If you look at the category and predicted path of a developing storm, you can go to the past and find that we had a similar storm so many years ago and that this was how it developed. Such a direct comparison might be helpful for the general public."


http://www.earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Ne ... 76823.html
------------
Here's his page:
http://www.ume.maine.edu/iceage/people/zielinski.html



Beginning this month, dozens of scientists on the ground, in the air, and using satellite observations will start a multi-year experiment to study winter snow packs on the Colorado side of the Rocky Mountains to improve the estimation of snow amount and forecasting of spring flooding due to snowmelt. The NASA-funded experiment will also study the role of cold lands within the Earth's climate.

Scientists from six federal agencies and students from many universities will use skis, snowmobiles, and aircraft to survey and sample snow during this NASA Cold Land Process Experiment (CLPX). They also plan to use microwave measurements from satellites and aircraft to measure characteristics of the snow pack and the freeze/thaw state of the land surface.
http://www.cosmiverse.com/science02180202.html
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