Sandbagging: A Parable

Sandbagging: A Parable

Joined: May 4th, 2005, 1:31 pm

February 26th, 2010, 3:57 am #1

Sandbagging: A Parable

Once there was a man who came to the confluence of the Tigris and Euphrates. He settled there, built a house, raised a family, and started a farm. He was prosperous most years, but once every dozen years the great rivers would overflow their boundaries and his livelihood would be destroyed. He surveyed his land for a solution to this problem; he prayed; he made sacrifices; he fasted. Still the rivers overflowed. After the third such flood, he wandered into the desert to seek the guidance of the gods. After 4o days wandering and fasting, with weakness and delusion creeping into his body and mind, he looked across the vast expanse of sand and found a solution. He thanked the gods and journeyed home.

When he arrived, he told his wife of his desert vision. "We will collect all the grain bags in town after they have been emptied, and we will fill them with sand. When the waters threaten to overflow their banks, we will shore up those banks with these 'sand bags.'"

"This can never work," his wife said. "Sand cannot hold back water. Isn't sand on the bottom of the ocean, and isn't it carried along by the current of a river?"

"These things are true," the man said. "But when the density of the sand is increased by packing, they will be as large bricks, a wall against the current."

The next time the floods started, the man protected his city and his farm with these bags. The people celebrated with a great party. They made him mayor for a day. They composed songs about his prowess, brilliance, and compassion. Shortly after, an organization was formed: the first sandbaggers association of Mesopotamia. The man wasn't happy with the organization; he believed any person could make their own sandbags, but the organization did good work, so he went to his grave content and prosperous.

Not many generations later, the first sandbaggers association of Mesopotamia came up with a list of by-laws. These included the requirements to be a member of the association. Among the requirements was the stipulation that any sandbagger must acknowledge that the first sandbagger was the greatest sandbagger. Indeed, he was god of sandbaggers. Additionally, they were made to swear that association meetings combined with the confession that the first sandbagger was superior were both required to be an official sandbagger.

Many years later, a young man who grew up in the town showed up to work along the banks of the rivers when the spring rains threatened to swell the rivers beyond their banks. The sandbagger foreman asked to see his membership tablet.

"I am no member," the man said. "I simply desire to help."

"You must first swear that the first sandbagger was greatest," the foreman said. "And then you must agree to regular meetings, at which we will all proclaim together that he was greatest."

"Can't I simply help stop the river from overwhelming the city?" The young man asked.

"No," the foreman replied. "If you don't acknowledge that the first sandbagger is greatest, then you are not truly sandbagging."

The young man was greatly saddened. He thanked the foreman for his time, walked down the river a few miles and began to make his own sandbags.


###
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 13th, 2010, 2:50 pm

February 26th, 2010, 4:06 am #2


But it is the true path.
Quote
Like
Share

truthbetold
truthbetold

February 26th, 2010, 8:01 am #3

Sandbagging: A Parable

Once there was a man who came to the confluence of the Tigris and Euphrates. He settled there, built a house, raised a family, and started a farm. He was prosperous most years, but once every dozen years the great rivers would overflow their boundaries and his livelihood would be destroyed. He surveyed his land for a solution to this problem; he prayed; he made sacrifices; he fasted. Still the rivers overflowed. After the third such flood, he wandered into the desert to seek the guidance of the gods. After 4o days wandering and fasting, with weakness and delusion creeping into his body and mind, he looked across the vast expanse of sand and found a solution. He thanked the gods and journeyed home.

When he arrived, he told his wife of his desert vision. "We will collect all the grain bags in town after they have been emptied, and we will fill them with sand. When the waters threaten to overflow their banks, we will shore up those banks with these 'sand bags.'"

"This can never work," his wife said. "Sand cannot hold back water. Isn't sand on the bottom of the ocean, and isn't it carried along by the current of a river?"

"These things are true," the man said. "But when the density of the sand is increased by packing, they will be as large bricks, a wall against the current."

The next time the floods started, the man protected his city and his farm with these bags. The people celebrated with a great party. They made him mayor for a day. They composed songs about his prowess, brilliance, and compassion. Shortly after, an organization was formed: the first sandbaggers association of Mesopotamia. The man wasn't happy with the organization; he believed any person could make their own sandbags, but the organization did good work, so he went to his grave content and prosperous.

Not many generations later, the first sandbaggers association of Mesopotamia came up with a list of by-laws. These included the requirements to be a member of the association. Among the requirements was the stipulation that any sandbagger must acknowledge that the first sandbagger was the greatest sandbagger. Indeed, he was god of sandbaggers. Additionally, they were made to swear that association meetings combined with the confession that the first sandbagger was superior were both required to be an official sandbagger.

Many years later, a young man who grew up in the town showed up to work along the banks of the rivers when the spring rains threatened to swell the rivers beyond their banks. The sandbagger foreman asked to see his membership tablet.

"I am no member," the man said. "I simply desire to help."

"You must first swear that the first sandbagger was greatest," the foreman said. "And then you must agree to regular meetings, at which we will all proclaim together that he was greatest."

"Can't I simply help stop the river from overwhelming the city?" The young man asked.

"No," the foreman replied. "If you don't acknowledge that the first sandbagger is greatest, then you are not truly sandbagging."

The young man was greatly saddened. He thanked the foreman for his time, walked down the river a few miles and began to make his own sandbags.


###
Four frogs sat upon a log that lay floating on the edge of a river. Suddenly the log was caught by the current and swept slowly down the stream...

The frogs were delighted and absorbed, for never before had they sailed...

At length, one of the frogs spoke, and said, "This is indeed a most marvellous log. It moves as if alive. No such log was ever known before."...

Then the second frog spoke, and said, "Nay, my friend, the log is like other logs, and does not move. It is the river that is walking to the sea, and carries us and the log with it."...

And the third frog spoke, and said, "It is neither the log nor the river that moves. The moving is in our thinking. For without thought, nothing moves."...


Then, the three frogs began to wrangle about what was really moving. The quarrel grew hotter and louder, but they could not agree...

Then they turned to the fourth frog, who up to this time had been listening attentively but holding his peace, and they asked his opinion...

And the fourth frog said, "None of you is wrong, and each of you is right. The moving is in the log and in the water and our thinking."...

The three frogs became very angry, for none of them was willing to admit that its own was not the whole truth, and that the other two were not wholly wrong...

Then, a strange thing happened. The three frogs got together and pushed the fourth frog off the log into the river...



You might want to walk with persons who seek truth

The person who walks away from you might be the one who has it
Quote
Share

Joined: January 13th, 2010, 2:50 pm

February 26th, 2010, 2:35 pm #4


But it is the true path.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 4th, 2006, 5:18 pm

February 26th, 2010, 3:00 pm #5

Four frogs sat upon a log that lay floating on the edge of a river. Suddenly the log was caught by the current and swept slowly down the stream...

The frogs were delighted and absorbed, for never before had they sailed...

At length, one of the frogs spoke, and said, "This is indeed a most marvellous log. It moves as if alive. No such log was ever known before."...

Then the second frog spoke, and said, "Nay, my friend, the log is like other logs, and does not move. It is the river that is walking to the sea, and carries us and the log with it."...

And the third frog spoke, and said, "It is neither the log nor the river that moves. The moving is in our thinking. For without thought, nothing moves."...


Then, the three frogs began to wrangle about what was really moving. The quarrel grew hotter and louder, but they could not agree...

Then they turned to the fourth frog, who up to this time had been listening attentively but holding his peace, and they asked his opinion...

And the fourth frog said, "None of you is wrong, and each of you is right. The moving is in the log and in the water and our thinking."...

The three frogs became very angry, for none of them was willing to admit that its own was not the whole truth, and that the other two were not wholly wrong...

Then, a strange thing happened. The three frogs got together and pushed the fourth frog off the log into the river...



You might want to walk with persons who seek truth

The person who walks away from you might be the one who has it
A parable must be a real event that actually happened

Everyday conversation contains parables, just so long as the truth is being spoken.





"Error does not become Truth because it is widely accepted; Truth does not become error, even when it stands alone!" <i>
(Thanks Kristy)
</i>
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 13th, 2010, 2:50 pm

February 26th, 2010, 3:06 pm #6


This subject has come up before. And since it's not what I learned, my interest was sparked... So I went to check it out.

Google's definition:
fable: a short moral story (often with animal characters)

Dictionary definition:
par·a·ble /pærbl/ Show Spelled[par-uh-buhl]
noun
1.a short allegorical story designed to illustrate or teach some truth, religious principle, or moral lesson.
2.a statement or comment that conveys a meaning indirectly by the use of comparison, analogy, or the like.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 4th, 2006, 5:18 pm

February 26th, 2010, 3:21 pm #7

Metaphors, analogies, allegorical stories etc may be interesting - but they are not parables.

The Word of God ia always true - in every way and from every perspective.

Believe it or not.






"Error does not become Truth because it is widely accepted; Truth does not become error, even when it stands alone!" <i>
(Thanks Kristy)
</i>
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: October 1st, 2006, 10:04 am

February 26th, 2010, 3:31 pm #8

But it is the true path.
I am finding that to be true.



Know Thyself
Quote
Like
Share

truthbetold
truthbetold

February 26th, 2010, 5:13 pm #9

Metaphors, analogies, allegorical stories etc may be interesting - but they are not parables.

The Word of God ia always true - in every way and from every perspective.

Believe it or not.






"Error does not become Truth because it is widely accepted; Truth does not become error, even when it stands alone!" <i>
(Thanks Kristy)
</i>
The dictionaries seem to disagree with you.

However, when you are right, the dictionaries, all of them, are mistaken.

On the other hand, when you are mistaken, the dictionaries may be right.

It begs the question, how are you going to show true what you assert?



I'm a sucker for arguments that work, I chuckle over those that don't
Quote
Share

truthbetold
truthbetold

February 26th, 2010, 5:47 pm #10

Metaphors, analogies, allegorical stories etc may be interesting - but they are not parables.

The Word of God ia always true - in every way and from every perspective.

Believe it or not.






"Error does not become Truth because it is widely accepted; Truth does not become error, even when it stands alone!" <i>
(Thanks Kristy)
</i>
"Believe it or not."

I don't believe. I find out.

So, let's take your assertion to the test.


According to the bible, purported to be "God's inerrant word" ...

... "hares and coneys are unclean because they "chew the cud" but do not part the hoof"
Unfortunately for "god", hares and coneys are not ruminants, they therefore do not "chew the cud."

... camels do not have a split hoof"
Unfortunately for "god", any teenager can tell you what a "cameltoe" is.

... "bats are fowl"
Unfortunately for "god", bats are not birds, bats are mammals.

... "all fowls that creep, going upon all four, shall be an abomination to us"
Unfortunately for "god", no such birds exist, and, on side note, "god", the creator of all that is, created abominations.

... "the musterd seed is the smallest of seeds"
Unfortunately for "god", the smallest known seed is that of the orchid.

... "talking snakes are condemned to crawl on their bellies and eat dust"
Unfortunately for "god", no one knows, not even "god", how the snakes got around before and why they ceased talking.



I'm a sucker for arguments that work, I chuckle over those that don't
Quote
Share