JVH, an answer to one of your questions

JVH, an answer to one of your questions

Phred
Phred

September 28th, 2010, 8:31 pm #1

JVH>"If the Earth is going around the Sun, then the speed of its satellite would have to adjust due to the differences of the gravitational pull of the Earth. When the satellite is 'in the back' the Earth, it would have to 'follow' the Earth. When the satellite is 'in front' of the Earth, the Earth would 'follow' its satellite.

Since the Earth is supposed to be going around the Sun with an alleged speed of 107,534 km/hr or there abouts, the speed of its satellite - to account for the change of the gravity pull - would have to drastically change. It doesn't, apparently.

If the Earth does not circle the sun, and "the universe" revolves the Earth, Earth's gravitational pull on its satellite would be the same - regardless of its position on the orbit - which seems to be the case."

What you have stated is false. Gravity follows an inverse square law. That is, its power declines with the square of the distance between the attractors. The distance between the earth and the sun is 93,000,000 miles. The distance between the earth and the moon is approx. 384,000 miles. Even given the immense mass of the sun the distance is so great that the moon barely notices the sun in relation to the earth.

If the sun were a basketball and you put it on the goal line of a football field then take a pin and go to the 30 yard line that would be the earth. The moon is 1/6 the size of the head of the pin. It is barely affected by the basketball's gravity at this distance compared to the pin. However... it's still six inches away.

Just in case you're curious. Saturn would be three football fields away. The nearest star would be in Hawaii if the basketball were on a football field in Baltimore.
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Joined: May 4th, 2005, 1:31 pm

September 28th, 2010, 8:54 pm #2

Is the aspirin kickin' in yet?


Also, you're login is:

Phred01


In case you forgot.


On edit, changed your to you're cuz I am a ... bastage.
Last edited by Oscar50 on September 28th, 2010, 9:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: September 2nd, 2004, 3:24 pm

September 28th, 2010, 10:21 pm #3

you slimebastage.
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Joined: January 13th, 2010, 2:50 pm

September 28th, 2010, 11:30 pm #4

JVH>"If the Earth is going around the Sun, then the speed of its satellite would have to adjust due to the differences of the gravitational pull of the Earth. When the satellite is 'in the back' the Earth, it would have to 'follow' the Earth. When the satellite is 'in front' of the Earth, the Earth would 'follow' its satellite.

Since the Earth is supposed to be going around the Sun with an alleged speed of 107,534 km/hr or there abouts, the speed of its satellite - to account for the change of the gravity pull - would have to drastically change. It doesn't, apparently.

If the Earth does not circle the sun, and "the universe" revolves the Earth, Earth's gravitational pull on its satellite would be the same - regardless of its position on the orbit - which seems to be the case."

What you have stated is false. Gravity follows an inverse square law. That is, its power declines with the square of the distance between the attractors. The distance between the earth and the sun is 93,000,000 miles. The distance between the earth and the moon is approx. 384,000 miles. Even given the immense mass of the sun the distance is so great that the moon barely notices the sun in relation to the earth.

If the sun were a basketball and you put it on the goal line of a football field then take a pin and go to the 30 yard line that would be the earth. The moon is 1/6 the size of the head of the pin. It is barely affected by the basketball's gravity at this distance compared to the pin. However... it's still six inches away.

Just in case you're curious. Saturn would be three football fields away. The nearest star would be in Hawaii if the basketball were on a football field in Baltimore.
I was trying avoid pointing out yet another inaccuracy.

It is actually incorrect, or maybe a more correct term would be imprecise, to say that the Moon revolves around the Earth and that the Earth revolves around the Sun.

The Earth and Moon revolve around common focal point(s). That focal point and the Sun revolve around another common focal point(s). All the other planets, moons, stars, and whatnot also participate in this "rotational dance of gravitational pull". In simple appearances, and simple "layman's term" descriptions, we can say that the "Earth revolves around the Sun". However, the actual reality and physics are not quite so simplistic.
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Joined: December 8th, 2003, 1:16 am

September 29th, 2010, 12:51 am #5

Who revolves around whom? Does the 112 lb damsel revolve around the 260 lb Irish bohunk or the other way around?

The little one just doesn't have enough mass to swing the big one around itself but .... the little one has some effect on the big one to deflect its otherwise free state.

Something like that?

-Vince
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Joined: January 13th, 2010, 2:50 pm

September 29th, 2010, 12:56 am #6

A square dance to a Tool song in a quasi-3D/4D hologram created by God in a big bang of an infinite number of parallel universes where, in one of the universes, aliens landed on one planet to order to populate it just so there could be the dance, or not.


Square dancing to this:

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value=""></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>
Last edited by ever-a-newbie on September 29th, 2010, 1:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: May 4th, 2005, 1:31 pm

September 29th, 2010, 2:11 am #7

I think I'm having a flashback.

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Joined: May 4th, 2005, 1:31 pm

September 29th, 2010, 2:14 am #8

I was trying avoid pointing out yet another inaccuracy.

It is actually incorrect, or maybe a more correct term would be imprecise, to say that the Moon revolves around the Earth and that the Earth revolves around the Sun.

The Earth and Moon revolve around common focal point(s). That focal point and the Sun revolve around another common focal point(s). All the other planets, moons, stars, and whatnot also participate in this "rotational dance of gravitational pull". In simple appearances, and simple "layman's term" descriptions, we can say that the "Earth revolves around the Sun". However, the actual reality and physics are not quite so simplistic.
Yeah, everything is in motion. The whole solar system is moving, the galaxy is moving. All the galaxies and all the solar systems and all the stars and planets and asteroids and comets and space junk.

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Joined: December 8th, 2003, 1:16 am

September 29th, 2010, 5:40 am #9

A square dance to a Tool song in a quasi-3D/4D hologram created by God in a big bang of an infinite number of parallel universes where, in one of the universes, aliens landed on one planet to order to populate it just so there could be the dance, or not.


Square dancing to this:

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value=""></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>
That sounds as bad as trying to square dance to a hit&miss grass cutting machine!~

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value=""></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

-Vince
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JVH
Joined: July 20th, 2009, 1:33 pm

September 30th, 2010, 9:52 am #10

JVH>"If the Earth is going around the Sun, then the speed of its satellite would have to adjust due to the differences of the gravitational pull of the Earth. When the satellite is 'in the back' the Earth, it would have to 'follow' the Earth. When the satellite is 'in front' of the Earth, the Earth would 'follow' its satellite.

Since the Earth is supposed to be going around the Sun with an alleged speed of 107,534 km/hr or there abouts, the speed of its satellite - to account for the change of the gravity pull - would have to drastically change. It doesn't, apparently.

If the Earth does not circle the sun, and "the universe" revolves the Earth, Earth's gravitational pull on its satellite would be the same - regardless of its position on the orbit - which seems to be the case."

What you have stated is false. Gravity follows an inverse square law. That is, its power declines with the square of the distance between the attractors. The distance between the earth and the sun is 93,000,000 miles. The distance between the earth and the moon is approx. 384,000 miles. Even given the immense mass of the sun the distance is so great that the moon barely notices the sun in relation to the earth.

If the sun were a basketball and you put it on the goal line of a football field then take a pin and go to the 30 yard line that would be the earth. The moon is 1/6 the size of the head of the pin. It is barely affected by the basketball's gravity at this distance compared to the pin. However... it's still six inches away.

Just in case you're curious. Saturn would be three football fields away. The nearest star would be in Hawaii if the basketball were on a football field in Baltimore.
 

Here's is where my insufficient knowledge of English grammar comes to haunt me. Dammit.

Let me rephrase:

If the Earth is going around the Sun, then the speed of Earth's satellite <strong></strong>would have to adjust due to the differences of the gravitational pull between the earth and its satellite. When Earth's satellite is 'behind' the Earth, it would have to 'follow' the Earth. When earth's satellite is 'in front' of the Earth, the Earth would 'chase' its satellite.

Since the Earth is supposed to be going around the Sun with an alleged speed of 107,534 km/hr or there abouts, the speed of Earth's satellite - to account for the change of the gravity pull - would have to drastically change. It doesn't, apparently.

If the Earth does not circle the sun, and "the universe" revolves the Earth, Earth's gravitational pull on its satellite would be the same - regardless of its position on the orbit - which seems to be the case.
<p align="center"><a href="http://www.network54.com/Forum/272761/% ... ay%3C/a%3E" rel="nofollow"></a> 
<p align="center"><strong>Hearsay</strong>


We don't see things as they are, we see things as we are


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Last edited by JVH on September 30th, 2010, 11:01 am, edited 1 time in total.
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