Violence against Umpires on the up :-(

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Joined: May 24th, 2016, 9:00 pm

November 6th, 2016, 10:04 pm #11

Ashes 2013: Stuart Broad is a blatant cheat - Darren Lehmann.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/cricket/23778598
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Joined: April 2nd, 2014, 9:31 am

November 6th, 2016, 10:06 pm #12

Stokes told the BBC: "We're trying to win a game here playing for our country, so give us a bit of leeway."

England's vice-captain for the one-day series in Bangladesh also claims some fans want players to sledge each other.

"They like to see passion and desire to win, so I think there could be a bit more lenience towards stuff like that, definitely,"
Don't disagree with anything he says there and also agree that quite often umpires getting involved does blow situations up more than it helps sometimes.
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Joined: April 2nd, 2014, 9:31 am

November 6th, 2016, 10:09 pm #13

Ashes 2013: Stuart Broad is a blatant cheat - Darren Lehmann.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/cricket/23778598
Right, so in a thread about showing respect for umpires your contribution is to slate a player for accepting the umpires decision? Couldn't make it up really.
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Joined: May 24th, 2016, 9:00 pm

November 6th, 2016, 10:35 pm #14

Don't disagree with anything he says there and also agree that quite often umpires getting involved does blow situations up more than it helps sometimes.
The fact that you're defending someone like Stuart Broad shows how much bias you have towards England.
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Joined: May 6th, 2015, 12:10 pm

November 7th, 2016, 8:21 am #15

I'm unaware of Stokes saying 'fans want to see passion' but I'll take your word for it he did.
I'm certainly bemused what their size has to do about anything though. One of the biggest sledgers in recent history was Warne and I'd describe him as physically intimidating.
Warne was the joker in a playground mob; Broad et al are playground bullies. Do you mean to say that when Stokes puffs his chest out, swears and advances belligerently towards an opponent, that his physical size is neither here nor there?
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Joined: September 7th, 2015, 9:28 pm

November 7th, 2016, 8:44 am #16

Well of course the whole thing is down to letting oik's play a game designed for gentlemen!
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Joined: October 20th, 2013, 8:03 pm

November 7th, 2016, 9:30 am #17

Not a Broad fan - though he surprised and impressed me for Notts at Headingley in 2015, but the cheat business is ludicrous, and not one of Boof's finest moments. Broad edged a ball to the wk who knocked it to slip. The Aussie media talked nonsense about him edging it to slip and refusing to walk.

Nevertheless Broad is petulant and surly. I can perfectly accept him saying he doesn't walk but leaves it to the umpire. The natural flip-side of that should be accepting it when opponents do the same off his bowling, but when that happens he tends to throw his toys out of the pram.

I used to umpire a lot of colts' matches. A couple of years back I stood in in an emergency and was amazed at how much the atmosphere had altered in five to ten years. Easier to deal with kids. I started to tell one of them who'd been grumbling that his off-drive would be more effective if he got his elbow higher, and we quickly agreed that we'd leave each other to get on with our own roles in the match without any further comments. An adult might have thumped me.
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Joined: April 18th, 2014, 12:12 am

November 7th, 2016, 3:59 pm #18

Hi all
Has anyone seen this http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-37865718
I am looking to get into umpiring and feel this is a disturbing story
Cricket should be played with respect to everyone...team mates,opponent and officials
If it's getting to chavvy levels,as football has,I might not bother trying my hand at standing in the middle
It mentions penalty runs...the laws already allow for this so perhaps they should be applied much more....in the same way as they should be more rigorously applied to slow bowling...but that's a different receptacle of seafood !!!!!
Opinions please
The article strikes me as a bit of sensationalism with a lack of detail about the type of abuse, when it occured and what level of punishments respective leagues issue. How can percentages be used if the number of umpires are in "hundreds", it could mean anything from 101-999.

It would be interesting to know what types of punishments that are issued in the Derbyshire area, because verbally abusing an umpire carries a six match ban in a local league I recently played in and captains are held responsible for player conduct. For what it's worth I wouldn't be deterred with the article and some local leagues have umpires shortages to a point where lower division fixtures are in danger of not even having one umpire at a game.



No Pyrah, no party
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Joined: June 4th, 2015, 6:32 pm

November 7th, 2016, 6:25 pm #19

In the end if you can't get umpires you will struggle to get a game. It's up to clubs and skippers to get hold of this and nip in the bud just as much as it is for the authorities to hand out suspensions.

Yes some of the named England players set a poor example but they are fined out of their match fees if they overstep too far but none have been violent to umpires. They do of course have DRS to fall back on if they don't like a decision but sadly your average club third team won't offer that luxury.

I think sledging comes in various forms. The good stuff is funny rather than physical threats or foul language. But the Hughes legacy that promised a return to gentlemenly behaviour lasted very little time at all.
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Joined: September 7th, 2015, 9:28 pm

November 7th, 2016, 8:01 pm #20

In the professional game there seems to me to be an increase in the number of players being hauled over the coals and fined or reprimanded. The umpires and match referee seem to have things under control.

Perhaps the level of the fines should be looked at, especially for a second or subsequent offence. We all make the odd mistake and it might be best to hit the repeat offenders hardest.

On an amateur level I remember similar shock headlines about violence towards football and rugby refs. Sign of the times I'm afraid.

People going into umpiring should take a good look at themselves and be sure they are doing it for the right reasons. If you suspect you might be a bit of a control freak, think again. Affable chaps who love the game are very unlikely to come into much conflict.
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