Kolpaks

Moderator: Assistant Moderator

Kolpaks

Joined: September 3rd, 2014, 1:34 pm

December 8th, 2016, 12:22 am #1

What happens to Kolpaks after March 2019?

Anyone have any idea?

For reference:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/england/con ... 99952.html

Or for those of a more technical disposition:

http://curia.europa.eu/juris/liste.jsf? ... m=C-438/00

Reply
Like
Share

Joined: October 20th, 2013, 8:03 pm

December 8th, 2016, 7:59 am #2

Given the present state of affairs, whatever their fate, it's likely to be a relatively unconsidered consequence of whatever decisions are made for the bigger picture, and they will be an ill-thought out shambles.
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: September 7th, 2015, 9:28 pm

December 8th, 2016, 8:39 am #3

I always think sportsmen will find a way round any restrictions. They might have to start as a club professional and make it on residency rules.
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: May 24th, 2016, 9:00 pm

December 8th, 2016, 8:59 am #4

I find it bizarre that some who voted remain aren't big supporters of Kolpaks, the rule change should be about choosing from quality instead of having a mass quantity available.
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: April 11th, 2014, 2:11 pm

December 8th, 2016, 9:15 am #5

Jacobus24 I hope people who voted remain or leave based their decision on more then overseas rules for county cricket.

Think a good compromise for Kolpacks would be they should be allowed to see out their contracts and after those have expired they must be considered as an overseas player.
Think Derbyshire have just signed Hardus Viljoen as a Kolpack on a three year contract. If for example we are out of the EU in two years he should be allowed to see out his final year as a non overseas player but if re signs after he would be an overseas player.
Hope I have explained that clearly.
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: March 7th, 2014, 11:28 am

December 8th, 2016, 9:40 am #6

There are tens of thousands of small, medium and large legal implications of leaving the EU, which is why as a starting point the government will have to enshrine all existing EU legislation into UK law and then choose what to unpick at its leisure. Rewriting this legislation would otherwise take decades of parliamentary time and it isn't going to happen. Freedom of movement does appear to be highish up on the political agenda though, so you would imagine that this would be dealt with sooner rather than later - but there is no reason why the UK could not choose to continue with a kolpak type arrangement but limit it to certain professions.
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: April 28th, 2016, 12:45 pm

December 8th, 2016, 9:41 am #7

Jacobus24 I hope people who voted remain or leave based their decision on more then overseas rules for county cricket.

Think a good compromise for Kolpacks would be they should be allowed to see out their contracts and after those have expired they must be considered as an overseas player.
Think Derbyshire have just signed Hardus Viljoen as a Kolpack on a three year contract. If for example we are out of the EU in two years he should be allowed to see out his final year as a non overseas player but if re signs after he would be an overseas player.
Hope I have explained that clearly.
all the fuss over kolpack players when over the years England have played south African players with no fuss just look at our own Garry Ballance and Keaton Jennings and so on .
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: February 13th, 2014, 9:14 pm

December 8th, 2016, 12:49 pm #8

For me it's not about where the player is born. Personally speaking I have 3 different South Asian countries and 3 British Countries accounting for me up to my Grandparent levels. I was born and raised in Yorkshire but I won't have anyone tell me I am anything otherwise.

I think the question more comes into to moral compass of who developed you. Morgan is Irish but in my view was developed by Middlesex. That said his famous wrist movement he puts down to his Gaelic upbringing.

In terms of 'Kolpak' I see a huge different in the likes of a Rudolph or the lad whose signed for Derbyshire who have no link to this country other than opportunity...Compared to the likes of Jennings or Pieterson who have an English parent and were developed from their late teens in this Country.

Personally speaking I could understand if Jennings considered himself English because of his mum. Though I consider myself a proud Englishman I have a big soft spot for a country in my paternal heritage and though it would never reach the love I hold for England, I do consider it my spiritual home.
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: July 9th, 2008, 6:18 pm

December 13th, 2016, 1:15 pm #9

An interesting read from the ever-excellent The Spin:

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2016/ ... ket-brexit

Reply
Like
Share

Joined: September 3rd, 2014, 1:34 pm

December 21st, 2016, 8:12 am #10

Thanks for that CaravanShaker. Very interesting and helpful article.

Amused to read " ... still waiting for a reply from the Home Office."

Like the rest of the country.

My guess is that the law will stay in force when the proposed so-called Great Repeal Bill brings all existing EU-wide legislation into UK domestic law. It will then take its turn in the queue for Parliamentary time to be available debate and change it. The ECB will be free to change its own rules, but that will be subject to a legal challenge by any individual or county until such time as the law may be changed.

So, unless it becomes a political priority for some odd reason, it will be likely to stay around for ten years or more.

County cricket as we know it may have gone to its g(G)rave(s) by then ...
Reply
Like
Share