Blast.

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Blast.

Joined: August 14th, 2007, 12:51 pm

July 7th, 2017, 10:02 am #1

I've noticed that this weekends Blast matches show an interesting trend.

As of this morning, the matches at Chesterfield, Cheltenham, Chelmsford and Worcester are all sold out.
The match at Northampton is close to a sell out.

I don't interpret this as a sign of a competition struggling to attract support. Indeed it would appear that the very Counties likely to be marginalised by the ECB's new City Based Competition are doing remarkably well in attracting an audience.
I doubt whether the sell out crowds at these places will be hurrying to Leeds or Manchester or Birmingham in order to watch cricket.
The real risk is that many of these supporters of the Blast will be lost to the game.
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Joined: October 7th, 2014, 11:05 am

July 7th, 2017, 11:05 am #2

A couple of weeks ago George Dobell reported that ticket sales for the T20 blast were up 16% on last year, which, if memory serves, had a similar increase from 2015.
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Joined: January 7th, 2017, 9:51 am

July 7th, 2017, 11:32 am #3

I've noticed that this weekends Blast matches show an interesting trend.

As of this morning, the matches at Chesterfield, Cheltenham, Chelmsford and Worcester are all sold out.
The match at Northampton is close to a sell out.

I don't interpret this as a sign of a competition struggling to attract support. Indeed it would appear that the very Counties likely to be marginalised by the ECB's new City Based Competition are doing remarkably well in attracting an audience.
I doubt whether the sell out crowds at these places will be hurrying to Leeds or Manchester or Birmingham in order to watch cricket.
The real risk is that many of these supporters of the Blast will be lost to the game.
These "sell-out" venues do, indeed, have something in common. They all have smaller capacities than do the bigger Test Match grounds. It follows that a smaller number of sales are needed to secure a "sell-out"
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Joined: August 14th, 2007, 12:51 pm

July 7th, 2017, 11:44 am #4

I've noticed that this weekends Blast matches show an interesting trend.

As of this morning, the matches at Chesterfield, Cheltenham, Chelmsford and Worcester are all sold out.
The match at Northampton is close to a sell out.

I don't interpret this as a sign of a competition struggling to attract support. Indeed it would appear that the very Counties likely to be marginalised by the ECB's new City Based Competition are doing remarkably well in attracting an audience.
I doubt whether the sell out crowds at these places will be hurrying to Leeds or Manchester or Birmingham in order to watch cricket.
The real risk is that many of these supporters of the Blast will be lost to the game.
Your point is valid Brickyard but doesn't address my point.
I wonder how many of these supporters attending the smaller grounds will attend the larger grounds come 2020 and the dawning of the ECB's brave new age of City cricket?

I'll also add that sell-out means exactly that. More supporters could have been accommodated.
5,000 in Cheltenham is,proportionately, hugely more than will attend tonight's games at Birmingham or Cardiff or Leeds.
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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 7:13 pm

July 7th, 2017, 6:46 pm #5

I've noticed that this weekends Blast matches show an interesting trend.

As of this morning, the matches at Chesterfield, Cheltenham, Chelmsford and Worcester are all sold out.
The match at Northampton is close to a sell out.

I don't interpret this as a sign of a competition struggling to attract support. Indeed it would appear that the very Counties likely to be marginalised by the ECB's new City Based Competition are doing remarkably well in attracting an audience.
I doubt whether the sell out crowds at these places will be hurrying to Leeds or Manchester or Birmingham in order to watch cricket.
The real risk is that many of these supporters of the Blast will be lost to the game.
Sky go on & on about the massive crowds at Essex, but that's because it only holds 5,500. Provided we get good weather there's a cahnce the Scarborough will get that many, for one day of a championship match
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Joined: April 11th, 2014, 7:14 am

July 9th, 2017, 5:36 pm #6

I've noticed that this weekends Blast matches show an interesting trend.

As of this morning, the matches at Chesterfield, Cheltenham, Chelmsford and Worcester are all sold out.
The match at Northampton is close to a sell out.

I don't interpret this as a sign of a competition struggling to attract support. Indeed it would appear that the very Counties likely to be marginalised by the ECB's new City Based Competition are doing remarkably well in attracting an audience.
I doubt whether the sell out crowds at these places will be hurrying to Leeds or Manchester or Birmingham in order to watch cricket.
The real risk is that many of these supporters of the Blast will be lost to the game.
Been to the Lancashire v Leicestershire game today at Liverpool. Without knowing what the capacity is I couldn't hazard a guess at the crowd numbers but it must have been at least 90% full on a tremendous sunny day. A lovely friendly ground and a thrilling end to an even game contested by 2 teams that had very little between them (2 to win off the last ball was achieved with a 6). Mark Cosgrove, in his short innings looked like he could pick the bowlers off at will and I was surprised when he got out. One thing that did stand out was the standard of fielding, both teams must have given away 10-15 runs with fumbles, letting the ball through them and general sloppiness, added to a fairly straightforward drop apiece. Both teams looked very reliant on a couple of batsmen, hopefully if we can nullify them these are teams we can take points from.
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Joined: August 20th, 2013, 11:26 am

July 9th, 2017, 5:51 pm #7

I've noticed that this weekends Blast matches show an interesting trend.

As of this morning, the matches at Chesterfield, Cheltenham, Chelmsford and Worcester are all sold out.
The match at Northampton is close to a sell out.

I don't interpret this as a sign of a competition struggling to attract support. Indeed it would appear that the very Counties likely to be marginalised by the ECB's new City Based Competition are doing remarkably well in attracting an audience.
I doubt whether the sell out crowds at these places will be hurrying to Leeds or Manchester or Birmingham in order to watch cricket.
The real risk is that many of these supporters of the Blast will be lost to the game.
Who would have thought it.

Leics & Derbys with 100% records, Notts have 2 losses from 2.

Lots of close matches. It is probably going to be one of those seasons where anyone can beat anyone, and the perceived wooden spoonists, finish in the top 4.
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Joined: September 3rd, 2014, 1:34 pm

July 10th, 2017, 7:08 am #8

I've noticed that this weekends Blast matches show an interesting trend.

As of this morning, the matches at Chesterfield, Cheltenham, Chelmsford and Worcester are all sold out.
The match at Northampton is close to a sell out.

I don't interpret this as a sign of a competition struggling to attract support. Indeed it would appear that the very Counties likely to be marginalised by the ECB's new City Based Competition are doing remarkably well in attracting an audience.
I doubt whether the sell out crowds at these places will be hurrying to Leeds or Manchester or Birmingham in order to watch cricket.
The real risk is that many of these supporters of the Blast will be lost to the game.
Bit like the Championship then. Essex anyone?
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Joined: September 7th, 2015, 9:28 pm

July 12th, 2017, 8:51 pm #9

I've noticed that this weekends Blast matches show an interesting trend.

As of this morning, the matches at Chesterfield, Cheltenham, Chelmsford and Worcester are all sold out.
The match at Northampton is close to a sell out.

I don't interpret this as a sign of a competition struggling to attract support. Indeed it would appear that the very Counties likely to be marginalised by the ECB's new City Based Competition are doing remarkably well in attracting an audience.
I doubt whether the sell out crowds at these places will be hurrying to Leeds or Manchester or Birmingham in order to watch cricket.
The real risk is that many of these supporters of the Blast will be lost to the game.
I watched some of the Sussex/Hants game tonight and the crowd looked pretty thin at Hove, especially for a local derby.

Sussex I thought were good at filling the ground for T20.

Either they have lost favour with the paying public, Wednesday nights are certainly not cricket nights, or the Sussex faithful have all got Sky!

Small local derby at Old Trafford on Friday sold out with 19,000 people, and that's on Sky too.
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Joined: August 14th, 2007, 12:51 pm

July 13th, 2017, 7:28 am #10

I've noticed that this weekends Blast matches show an interesting trend.

As of this morning, the matches at Chesterfield, Cheltenham, Chelmsford and Worcester are all sold out.
The match at Northampton is close to a sell out.

I don't interpret this as a sign of a competition struggling to attract support. Indeed it would appear that the very Counties likely to be marginalised by the ECB's new City Based Competition are doing remarkably well in attracting an audience.
I doubt whether the sell out crowds at these places will be hurrying to Leeds or Manchester or Birmingham in order to watch cricket.
The real risk is that many of these supporters of the Blast will be lost to the game.
One of the difficulties for the counties this year is that the notion of 'appointment to view' on a Friday night has been undermined by the return to a more concentrated dose of short-form cricket.
Sussex played their first match, which they lost, on Sunday at Arundel - in front of their usual 5,000+ - and their next home match, played in cool draughty conditions, was yesterday. Two matches in four days.
Soon Yorkshire will play three home matches in six days. Other counties experience the same concentration of fixtures. Somerset, for example, play three matches in five days at home, from the 21st of July,including their big Derby match with Gloucestershire. Even Somerset will struggle to sell out each of those matches.

When consulted, the counties asked for matches to be spread out over time and for most to be played on Friday.This resulted in increased attendances. The ECB have undermined these improvements in attendance by the change in scheduling and will, doubtless, be hoping for more unsettled weather and viewer exhaustion. Their agenda doesn't, any more, include the continued success of the Blast.
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