Mudguards

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Mudguards

Joined: May 9th, 2011, 10:52 pm

October 31st, 2016, 11:01 am #1

It's that time of year again, and with the changing of the clocks this weekend, everyone should have mudguards if attending club rides.

If like me, you seem to go through mudguards each year, share your experiences and recommendations here of which are the best/worst, or hints and tips for getting the most from them. Is it fair to expect them to last more than one season? Which ones can accomodate wider tyres? Which ones are easy to fit, or an absolute nightmare?

Cheers

Iain
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Joined: June 11th, 2014, 11:01 pm

November 2nd, 2016, 11:01 pm #2

Hi, I currently have merida's own make of mud guards on my cx bike that I have set up as a tourer. They have been excellent for wider gauge tyres and have been noise free, durable and keep the mud off me and those behind me. These attach to the eyelets so not suitable for all bikes. 8/10

I use race blades on my old winter bike which I have found good, certainly for my comfort when riding, although I think they don't go low enough to stop all spray to those behind. The are easy to fit with plastic loops and can be removed to clean the guards or bike easier. The carbon ones are quite easy to break. I would buy again. 8/10

I have had crud guards before and rate the least. They look smart but I find a are prone to warping or taking a shape that does not conform to the tyres and therefore they often rub or make irritating noises. They are long so in theory have good coverage but due to them being narrow are more suitable for a sleeker winter bike. I personally would not buy these again. 6/10
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Joined: January 3rd, 2013, 5:33 pm

November 8th, 2016, 12:12 pm #3

Get a winter bike with proper mudguards fitted.

Anything retro-fitted to a road bike doesn't work properly.

1) Total faff to fit.
2) Touches the tyres somewhere.
3) Doesn't cover you properly.
4) Doesn't cover your drivetrain properly.
5) Doesn't keep the rider behind you clean.
6) Doesn't even last a whole winter.

I challenge you to find me a set of mudguards fitting on a 'normal road bike' without mudguard mounts that ticks less than two of the points above.

The money I spent on mudguards over the last seven years, I could have bought a new aluminium winter bike frame and proper mudguards for. The time it took to fit all those mudguards, I could have also built said winter bike.

As I mostly ride on my own nowadays, I am happy to ride my commuting / CX bike with full mudguards. They only ticked point 1) above.
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Joined: May 9th, 2011, 10:52 pm

November 8th, 2016, 1:08 pm #4

Thanks for the feedback! I'd agree that a bike that's built to accomodate mudguards with mounting points will always result in a much sturdier set up, however my Croix de Fer always seems to have issues with front guards when it comes to wider tyres. And even with full front guards, I still get wet feet. Do you need to make some kind of home made extension/mud flap to stop this?
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Joined: January 3rd, 2013, 5:33 pm

November 8th, 2016, 1:18 pm #5

For me the SKS Bluemels mudflaps do the trick.

Otherwise, some sturdy plastic sheet extension is the solution.
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Joined: January 3rd, 2013, 5:33 pm

November 8th, 2016, 1:31 pm #6

... and coming back to Fiona's excellent review. I very much agree on the SKS Raceblades (not long) and the Cruds.

The SKS Raceblades are great for your summer bike on a rainy day. They keep you reasonably dry. Be aware that they WILL scratch your frame unless you wrap the frame tubes with tape. So, they may damage your fancy summer bike and they won't keep others dry on a group ride. In my opinion they are the most annoying and selfish mudguards to use on a club run. Riding behind somebody with them on their bike, I rather would have them not to have any mudguards at all. The Raceblades exactly funnel the road muc into the following rider's face.

The Cruds constantly rub, are an absolute pain to fit and won't last a winter. Because they are so narrow and constantly wobble around, despite their length they don't provide good cover. More often than not, the mudguard is not above the tyre. The only plus side is that they are often the only mudguards that fit on 'real' race bikes that have hardly any tyre clearance.

My favourites in terms of ease of fit, frame clearance and cover have been the SKS Raceblade Long. They have been discontinued for a while ... for a very good reason. They didn't even last half a winter. Although SKS have been great in replacing them, they just broke too often, usually within 4 - 8 weeks. They could not stand the vibrations from rough roads and potholes. They were simply too brittle at low temperatures and would eventually snap from the vibrations. - As far as I understand, SKS have now relaunched them. The blades are now made from a different material and supposed to last longer.

If I do not get a dedicated winter bike and will do some winter group riding the new SKS Raceblade Long will be the replacement of my current old SKS Raceblade Long that are held together at several places with duct tape. If the new ones do last the only disadvantage will be that they don't keep your drivetrain clean/dry.
Last edited by HendrikNahler on November 8th, 2016, 1:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: August 24th, 2012, 9:55 pm

November 8th, 2016, 6:59 pm #7

I have just put a pair of the mk3 Cruds into my winter bike as I wanted to put 25mm tyres onto it. I've not ridden it with them yet but it is a totally different design and they can take much wider tyres. I'll report after the first ride.
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Joined: January 3rd, 2013, 5:33 pm

November 9th, 2016, 10:49 pm #8

And then there are the Portland Design Works Full Metal Fenders for a whopping £75. They are supposed to be the most durable and best protection.

https://www.condorcycles.com/products/p ... tal-fender
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Joined: January 28th, 2010, 3:19 pm

November 10th, 2016, 7:37 pm #9

After years of faffing around with raceblades/crud guards , which always fitted badly and then broke, I decided a few years ago that aside from my good summer bike, which I don't foresee ever wanting to put mudguards on, I only ride bikes that are equipped with eyelets and have clearance for full mudguards. My brand of choice is SKS though I have to say I don't think I have tried any other. As an aside, I have now discovered disc brakes, which of course leave acres of room for mudguards and feel much safer when it's wet.
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Joined: June 12th, 2014, 9:23 am

November 16th, 2016, 8:45 am #10

At the start of 2015 I purchased my 'winter' bike, a Giant Defy 0. One of the selling points was its frame fittings for mudguards. After a bit of online searching I opted for the Giant Defy Fenders as these seemed to receive good reviews. Fitting was straightforward, however they only lasted around a year :(

1) The mudguard plastic was thin and flimsy which meant they constantly rattled.

2) Small rivets which attached the mudguards to metal sections to pass under the brake callipers broke. Replaced rivets and glued around for extra strength.

3) Metal 'L' clamp attaching to brake calliper holding bolt broke , now unusable.

Have just replaced them with SKS Raceblade XL's (wish I had seen this post first as looks like I wont be popular on club runs!!) this Saturday will be the first ride out on them.

Brian
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