Justin-T
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Joined: August 19th, 2009, 4:30 pm

June 26th, 2012, 3:04 pm #11

I guess they could have used it essentially as a well, removing water as needed with buckets? The spring would have kept refilling it, so could have served as a larger daily source for agricultural/small industrial needs??

Rest assured that many are looking at the pictures with interest, to a man/woman wishing they were digging with you!
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SacoHarry
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Joined: August 22nd, 2006, 9:29 pm

June 26th, 2012, 3:22 pm #12

Or could this have been a settling tank? If the springwater coming in from higher up was loaded with sediment, maybe a tank in the ground like this would settle out some of it, making it cleaner & clearer going on. Did Romans do that?
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Joined: December 10th, 2008, 4:10 pm

June 26th, 2012, 3:46 pm #13

Yes they did.
The London ampitheatre still has a lot of its plumbing and includes a silt-trap, and there are settling tanks associated with the floodwater harvesting systems in Libya (although these are primarily indigenous, the technology is definitely in use).
I believe that there is a settling tank at Chesters too (anyone know for sure?).

Last edited by mooseandhobbes on June 26th, 2012, 4:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Justin-T
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Joined: August 19th, 2009, 4:30 pm

June 26th, 2012, 4:10 pm #14

That would make sense, and having it close to the source, high above the level of the vicus and fort below. However, Justin is talking about (in his tweet today, includes a nice pic) a "drain" leading away from it. Wouldn't that just get it "dirty" again?
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SacoHarry
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Joined: August 22nd, 2006, 9:29 pm

June 26th, 2012, 4:23 pm #15

Justin-T wrote:"...Wouldn't that just get it "dirty" again?
If the stone lining was nice & tight when it was first laid down, and capped well, I bet water could get through it nicely without picking up much "gunk" at least along the 100 yards or so til its destination. The natural clay there on site doesn't get scooped up too easily by flowing water. Sand would, but clay kind of wants to stay put once it's packed down into the ground.

And how cool is that, Sunny, that there are still signs of how they used to do it all??
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Justin-T
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Joined: August 19th, 2009, 4:30 pm

June 26th, 2012, 4:56 pm #16

Those clever Romans. I had been thinking it would need lead, which the Romans were very adept at using in water supply systems (the adjustable/shut-off valves from Pompeii blew my mind when I saw them the other day in Boston), and I figured some of the lining would have been left behind for us to find. But clay would do the trick pretty well as long as it stayed damp. Which as we know, is a given in that particular spot...

I wonder if they've found anything dateable in the tank yet?
Last edited by Justin-T on June 26th, 2012, 4:58 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Fiona D
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Fiona D
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Joined: May 30th, 2010, 10:07 pm

June 27th, 2012, 12:18 pm #17

Fantastic photos Pete - your pictures always appreciated - never think not.

Can't get up for Friends night, but regards to all and I really hope all diggers get better weather than so far this season. :)
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Joined: December 10th, 2008, 4:10 pm

June 27th, 2012, 12:52 pm #18

I've just seen Justin's tweet. Rained off again. The weather webcams tell a sorry tale :'(


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SacoHarry
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Joined: August 22nd, 2006, 9:29 pm

June 27th, 2012, 1:13 pm #19

mooseandhobbes wrote:I've just seen Justin's tweet. Rained off again. The weather webcams tell a sorry tale :'(

Holy wow! The Winshields one is nothing but a big ball of gray. The other two little better. :(
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snowglobe
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Joined: May 6th, 2010, 12:16 pm

June 27th, 2012, 2:53 pm #20

Rain all night and a misty morning which turned to rain, managed a mornings digging (sliding) then retired for a long lunch and a lecture on leather shoes by Beth.
Lodging photos with Harry, glad they are coming in useful.
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