"modern" archeology of Twice Brewed

Badger
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Badger
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Joined: 1:10 PM - May 12, 2008

2:29 AM - Dec 11, 2009 #1

Digging roman stuff makes you forget that not all archeology is "ancient". In recent years there has been considerable interest in aviation archeology, especially of the Second World War.

In the early morning of 24 March, 1943 a Dornier 217E crashed near Twice Brewed. It appears to have hit Steel Rig, but accounts vary as to whether it was shot down or just flying too low. All five crew were killed in the crash, and were buried at Carlisle.

Anybody have a clue as to where exactly this site is?

Tim Wolter
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SacoHarry
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Joined: 9:29 PM - Aug 22, 2006

12:35 AM - Dec 30, 2009 #2

I love the Internet. Check it out, a fairly full account including pics -- though the cause of the crash isn't completely clear. Remarkably, the depression in the ground where the bomber hit is still visible today. http://www.acia.co.uk/crashsites/area1/dornier-1182.asp At the moment I can't quite picture that track or the exact location in my mind, though it seems clear that impact was up on the high ground on one side or the other of Peel Gap.

- Harry
Last edited by SacoHarry on 12:36 AM - Dec 30, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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Badger
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Badger
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4:39 PM - Dec 30, 2009 #3

Confusing pictures, but this would seem to be on Steel Rig, west of Peel Gap. In the background of one of the pictures I am pretty sure I am seeing the cliffs on the east end of the Gap, popular with rock climbers.
Lets send Michael H. up there to have a look around!
Or maybe just have another excuse for an after dinner hike next spring.

Odd that this lists four crewmen killed, when other accounts list five.

Tim Wolter
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