Royal Marines minor news thread

Joined: December 7th, 2016, 12:00 pm

March 8th, 2018, 3:23 pm #1

Since the Royal Marines have been in the spotlight (negatively and positively) for the last few months, I thought it might be better to have a RM minor new thread.

Mods, do you agree?

A good article from the RN website:

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https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/news-and-l ... l-exercise

Royal Marines donned gas masks for three weeks as they tested Britain’s ability to fight in the event of a chemical – or, worse, nuclear – attack.
Troops from 40 Commando, based at Norton Manor, near Taunton, joined the country’s leading experts in Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear warfare to make sure they could cope in a worst-case scenario.
The Corps trained extensively for the threat of chemical warfare in both Gulf wars – thankfully they were not used by Saddam Hussein’s forces against British troops in either conflict.

Fifteen years later, and the threat remains – though not in Iraq. But the conflict in Syria has shown that some nations not only possess weapons of mass destruction, but are prepared to use them.

Which is where Exercise Toxic Dagger – the largest of its kind in the UK – comes in, involving Public Health England, the Atomic Weapons Establishment and the government’s military labs, Defence Science and Technology Laboratory.
While the commandos have kept up with the latest developments and tactics on the battlefield, the scientists have monitored CBRN progress – and how to defeat them.

40 Commando would be first on the ground in the event of a CBRN incident as the Lead Commando Group, but their brawn requires scientific brain behind it; at DSTL’s headquarters a team is on hand to provide the crucial information to tell them what dangers they face and how to deal with them.
“Because the threat is a technical, scientific one, the ability to reach out to organisations with specialist skills greater than ours is crucial,” said Lieutenant Colonel Paul Maynard, 40 Cdo’s Commanding Officer.

The three-week exercise included company-level attacks and various CBRN scenarios based on the latest threats for ultimate realism, such as a raid on a suspected chemical weapons lab.

It climaxes with a full-scale exercise involving government and industry scientists and more than 300 military personnel, including the RAF Regiment and the RM Band Service – casualty treatment was a key part of the Salisbury Plain exercise.
A chemical decontamination area was set up not merely to treat ‘polluted’ commandos, but also any wounded prisoners they may have brought in; once cleansed, casualties can be treated in field/regular hospitals.

Everything is a lot slower because of the chemical agents we come across with chemical casualties there’s the clean/dirty process to go through which is manpower intensive. First there is dry decontamination, a clean area to remove contaminate clothes, before moving to the wet area, where the naked casualty is hosed down.

“It’s quite hard work because everyone needs to get involved moving casualties – big lads with all their equipment on, they are quite heavy,” explained B/Sgt Caitlin O’Malley of RM Band Plymouth, helping to run the casualty clearance station.
"The chemical weapons suits and respirators don’t merely make stretcher bearing more difficult – they make everything more difficult. Walking. Talking. Breathing. Shooting."

"So it’s good that every year the Corps refreshes its skills with such an exercise", says Bravo’s Officer Commanding Maj Rob Garside.
“Working with DSTL means we have the most up-to-date information and a realistic exercise. This ensures we are well prepared for a CBRN operating environment.

“It is vital we can make rapid decisions and are able to protect and support specialists who come in to deal with any incident. On operations these specialists are on hand to advise and we must ensure we already have a strong understanding of their capabilities and what they require of us as a military force.”
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Joined: December 7th, 2016, 12:00 pm

March 10th, 2018, 3:17 am #2



And elements of 40 Commando are deployed to Salisbury to assist the police for the Sergei Skripal case.
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Joined: December 7th, 2016, 12:00 pm

March 14th, 2018, 3:29 am #3

http://www.parliament.uk/business/publi ... 05/HL6063/

The Government can call on the Royal Navy's existing amphibious ships and the Bay Class ships of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary.

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Well this is a new admission but quite true until HMS Queen Elizabeth is declared IOC/FOC as a LPH.
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Joined: December 7th, 2016, 12:00 pm

April 20th, 2018, 7:44 am #4

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Joined: December 7th, 2016, 12:00 pm

April 22nd, 2018, 6:05 am #5

http://www.janes.com/article/79465/uk-a ... -in-merger

Cuts to the Royal Marines.

The UK’s standalone two-star amphibious headquarters is to be lost in a shake-up of maritime command and control organisations by the Royal Navy (RN), which controls the country’s amphibious shipping and the Royal Marines landing forces.

The Commander UK Amphibious Forces (COMUKAMPHIBFOR) Headquarters is to be folded into a revamped Maritime Battle Staff (MBS) later this year, according to a briefing document for Royal Marines personnel seen by Jane’s . Naval sources have claimed that the re-organisation would free up navy and marine staff officers to be redeployed to expand the one-star Carrier Strike Group headquarters supporting operations by the new carriers, HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Prince of Wales .
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Joined: August 24th, 2007, 11:14 pm

April 28th, 2018, 7:01 am #6

Whist I am no fan of the 'Snail' this article has some great photo shots :-

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... roops.html
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Joined: December 7th, 2016, 12:00 pm

April 29th, 2018, 7:08 am #7



Who is the biggest operational ship in the Royal Navy? UK in Brunei gets into a debate over it.
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Joined: December 7th, 2016, 12:00 pm

May 11th, 2018, 2:40 am #8

https://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/news-and-l ... the-jungle

Stifling humidity, tropical diseases and crocodile-infested rivers were just some of the challenges facing HMS Albion’s Royal Marines as they exercised in Brunei earlier this month.
As the United Kingdom’s ‘go to’ force for global operations, Royal Marines must be ready to operate in any environment - be it urban, arctic, desert or, in this case, jungle.
"This is the first time a Special Purpose Task Group has been sent to the Far East which is why we wanted to exploit whatever training we could in this part of the world. Brunei offered 80 per cent of my guys their first opportunity to work in the jungle”, explains 45 Commando’s Major Mick Trafford.
"The jungle is probably the best possible environment for honing Commando skills.
"In the Arctic the elements will always be your biggest enemy, whereas in the jungle once you learn how to manage the heat and humidity you can actually focus on pure soldiering."
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Major Mick Trafford, RM wrote:The jungle is probably the best possible environment for honing Commando skills. In the Arctic the elements will always be your biggest enemy, whereas in the jungle once you learn how to manage the heat and humidity you can actually focus on pure soldiering.
A Special Purpose Task Group (SPTG) is a high-readiness force of Royal Marines that can be forward deployed on a variety of ships – from auxiliaries to aircraft carriers – to fulfil a range of missions, including disaster relief and maritime security through to classic amphibious operations.
HMS Albion’s SPTG consists of some 160 officers and men, predominantly from 45 Commando’s Y Company but with engineer, logistics, signals and fire support elements drawn from various other Royal Marine and British Army Commando units.
Joining them in the jungle were HMS Albion’s own landing craft specialists from 4 Assault Group Royal Marines. One of them was Marine Jack Cameron who said:  “The humidity hit me as soon as were on the vehicle deck, even before we boarded the landing craft, and I didn’t stop sweating throughout.
"Once we got under the tree canopy it was cooler, but we had to do things differently. There was no crashing through the jungle. We had to slow right down and stay hydrated."
The first few days in the jungle focused on the core skills needed to operate in the unique environment, building basic competence from which to progress.
"The amount of personal administration to do with kit and healthcare was immense but you can’t afford dehydration or prickly heat to get in the way when you need to focus”, explained Lt James Smith of 45 Cdo.
The latter part of the week saw the Royal Marines conducting break contact drills, close target reconnaissance, patrol and navigation training and riverine exercises.
“It’s difficult to spot people in dense vegetation so you quickly become reliant on sound instead. But the more time you spend in the jungle the more attuned you become to the environment around you. Before long, you start to see the clues that people leave behind”, said Lt Smith, adding:
“When the terrain becomes too tough, the Royal Marines naturally take to the water. Our zodiac craft enabled us to move quickly and covertly in a way that would be impossible on foot or by road."
The Royal Marines were joined by a small group of officers and ratings from HMS Albion’s Ship’s Company, who were specially selected to gain an insight into how Commando Forces operate ashore.
HMS Albion’s ‘Bish’, Chaplain Eddie Wills, was one of them.
“I’ve spent quite a bit of time in the woodlands of the UK and so I felt entirely comfortable living among the trees but entirely uncomfortable in the heart and humidity.
"Nevertheless, it was a hugely memorable experience. You can count on the Royal Marines to put their heart and soul into any challenge, and that was absolutely true for the jungles of Brunei.”
Major Trafford said: “We crammed in a lot over six days, but it meant we had to move on quickly.
"This time we focused on section level drills rather troop or company level exercises, so it would be great to go back and do it all again in more depth and on a larger scale.”
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Joined: August 24th, 2007, 11:14 pm

May 16th, 2018, 2:24 pm #9

A very interesting government article in regards to the future of UK Amphibious ops, and the Royal Marines.

https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/c ... 4/1044.pdf
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Joined: December 7th, 2016, 12:00 pm

May 17th, 2018, 11:46 am #10

eldritch wrote: A very interesting government article in regards to the future of UK Amphibious ops, and the Royal Marines.

https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/c ... 4/1044.pdf
Basically, the government response clarifies some rumours and denies any big cuts. So it is still nothing sure until the MDP is published.
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