Joined: 3:53 PM - Mar 01, 2005

6:06 AM - Aug 10, 2018 #41

Props, shafts, & supports - but for CVN-65, not any battleship.

And ones for BB-59 Indiana (a bit later than our discussion).
Indiana props.jpg
Enterprise screws.jpg
There it is... the District of Columbia! You will never find a more wretched hive of scum and villainy. We must be cautious.
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Joined: 6:06 AM - Jan 18, 2007

9:23 AM - Aug 10, 2018 #42

You cannot help but wonder at the effect of a lucky torpedo, especially on the upper photo.
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Joined: 4:38 AM - Nov 25, 2014

1:16 PM - Aug 10, 2018 #43

Throd wrote: You cannot help but wonder at the effect of a lucky torpedo, especially on the upper photo.
Hmmm, that stern design with outboard shafts housed in structural skegs and extending abaft of inboard shafts was unique amongst battleships and considered by the USN to provide better protection to the shafts and propellers, at least against contact torpedos.

The Germans seems to have revised H class battleship design to give it similar outboard skegs after Bismarck suffered the fatal stern torpedo hit.
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Joined: 8:56 PM - Oct 06, 2011

3:01 PM - Aug 10, 2018 #44

According to Friedman whole point of skegs was correct flow of water over porpellants. Nothing about protection.
And I seriously doubt about its protection value.
According to drawings in Breyer (I checked it now) H42 to H44 had no such skegs. Only one "central one" separated right and left part of hull, and 4 rudders, each in race after propellant. So totally different solutions.
Noone floowed US pattern.
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Joined: 4:38 AM - Nov 25, 2014

3:37 PM - Aug 10, 2018 #45

I didn’t say the outboard skegs were adopted for its protective value, but that it would reduce the likelihood that contact strike from the side will disable both shafts on that side. 

Wikipedia claimed H-41 still had 3 shafts and added skegs to the outboard shaft.  Central skeg of the outline sketched would be impossible in a 3 shaft ship.
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Joined: 8:56 PM - Oct 06, 2011

4:10 PM - Aug 10, 2018 #46

H41, was H39 with war lessons gained. Still had the same machinery as H39.
I just checked wikipedia's reference G&D 320 page, and there is something about two skegs but nothing about skegs to the outboard shafts.
Drawing in Breyer is "strange" at best. Possibly someone missinterpreted something, but if anything could be understud from that draving that skegs are outboard shafts, and covers all propellants and 3 rudders.
Anyone has better drawing of that design? Specially aft part of ship.
If my memory os correct in "der Z-Plan" some drawing should be, but quite possibly only H39 version of ship.
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Joined: 9:14 PM - Sep 27, 2011

5:21 PM - Aug 10, 2018 #47

This is just my kind of crazy, but what's most interesting to me in that belly-up image are all of the docking keels.
Up and forward on the starboard side, down and aft on the port. 

The question of authority stalks the de-religionist project. (Paul Vander Klay)
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Joined: 6:07 PM - Apr 12, 2009

5:38 PM - Aug 10, 2018 #48

Was there ever a CV/CVN with 4 rudders? (one per shaft) The photos above reminded me of doing a model as a youngster that had equal number of rudders and screws, could have been an error on the part of the model company though. 
Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity.
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Joined: 4:38 AM - Nov 25, 2014

6:16 PM - Aug 10, 2018 #49

Enterprise CVN-65 has 4 rudders and 4 shafts.
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Joined: 3:53 PM - Mar 01, 2005

1:47 AM - Aug 11, 2018 #50

Chuck731 wrote:
FreshAirSnipe wrote: Was there ever a CV/CVN with 4 rudders? (one per shaft) The photos above reminded me of doing a model as a youngster that had equal number of rudders and screws, could have been an error on the part of the model company though.
Enterprise CVN-65 has 4 rudders and 4 shafts.

If you look closely in the photo I posted, you can see the rudders for the outboard shafts - they are perpendicular to the hull at their attachment point, so the outboard two are really angled outward from vertical!

Here is a photo of a model of CVN-65 - you can see how they sit clearly:




Note the rudder number given here:
Cruise Book - USS Enterprise CVN-65: Mediterranean Cruise 1999

DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY
USS ENTERPRISE CVN-65
FLEET POST OFFICE
AE 09543-2810

https://www.gjenvick.com/Military/NavyA ... Cruse.html

There it is... the District of Columbia! You will never find a more wretched hive of scum and villainy. We must be cautious.
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