LPD's modified to serve as ASW Mothership

You know how to build a ship better then the designers, show it here.
Joined: November 29th, 2004, 7:40 am

February 22nd, 2018, 8:01 pm #171

BSmittyVA wrote:
MattReloaded wrote:
BSmittyVA wrote: Clearly Sea Hunter can't handle the CSG case.  It's just not fast enough.  It could, potentially, handle the ESG and Convoy case, assuming running at 24+kts with a towed array in SS5 is possible, and doesn't reduce its endurance to nothing.
Sea Hunter could also be used as part of an ASW hunter-killer group centered around one cheap helicopter / UAV carrier.
Yes it could be, if it had the requisite tow performance.  
"We need to get closer to that Dane mentality" - Rear Admiral Bryant Fuller, NAVSEA Chief Engineer, March 2015 ASNE Day.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 29th, 2004, 7:40 am

February 25th, 2018, 9:22 pm #172

BSmittyVA wrote:
MattReloaded wrote:
BSmittyVA wrote: I'm curious about the towing capabilities of Sea Hunter.  To move beyond its simplistic ONR mission, I think it'll need to have some form of LFAS VDS.  But the more I read about it, the more it seems like the same things that give it long endurance (slender hull with low installed power), might inhibit it's ability to tow a useful sensor at "task force" speeds (i.e. sprint-drift), especially in high seas.
Geospectrum's TRAPS is said to be suitable for USVs and the single tow with a Vertical Projector Array (VPA) doesn't seem likely to generate much drag.

According to the brochure, "TRAPS is ideal for littoral operations and very useful in deep water as part of a multistatic system". Typical detection range is said to be up to 1 CZ.
TRAPS might be the right solution, I don't know.
Again, that's what TRAPS was supposedly designed for. See Parting shot: TRAPS :

The system is targeted at operators of smaller surface combatants and unmanned surface vessels (USVs) that require anti-submarine warfare (ASW) capabilities.

The TRAPS system is designed to be compatible with other hull-mounted sonar, dipping sonar, and sonobuoys, enabling bistatic and multistatic operations. The system operates at frequencies between 2 kHZ and 4 kHZ - or more - and depending on environmental conditions is said to be able to detect underwater vessels at a maximum range of 50 n miles when operating at speeds of up to 12 kt. 

Curtis-Wright states that as a result of its reduced size and weight, TRAPS will be the first towed active/passive sonar system that will enable smaller navies to perform effective ASW operations. The system's components include a winch drum, a tow cable, a directional passive towed array, a vertical projector array, a neutrally buoyant tow cable, and an operator console. 

In addition to being permanently installed on board a vessel, the TRAPS system can also be modularised in either a 10 ft or 20 ft container, the latter of which will include an operations room for the system's operator. 

Besides the detection of submarines, the directional passive towed array can also be upgraded to detect torpedoes and can be configured as a torpedo decoy.
"We need to get closer to that Dane mentality" - Rear Admiral Bryant Fuller, NAVSEA Chief Engineer, March 2015 ASNE Day.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 29th, 2004, 7:40 am

March 14th, 2018, 9:14 pm #173

From Flight Global :

U.S. Marine Corps puts out request for information for ship-based VTOL drone
12 MARCH, 2018
SOURCE: FLIGHTGLOBAL.COM
BY: GARRETT REIM, LOS ANGELES

The US Marine Corps issued a request for information for its proposed ship-based vertical takeoff and landing drone, the MUX aircraft, on 8 March.

MUX, which is short for Marine Air Ground Task Force – Unmanned Expeditionary Capabilities programme, would operate autonomously from the deck of an amphibious assault ship and is designed to fill what the USMC sees as its current inability to provide persistent multi-role aerial coverage 350nm (648km) beyond its ships.

The MUX’s multiple roles would include early warning defence, reconnaissance, electronic warfare, and communications relay capabilities, according to the USMC’s request for information. A secondary priority for the aircraft would be offensive air support. The aircraft may also be used for aerial escort and cargo missions, but the USMC indicated that those capabilities are lesser priorities and would likely be taken up by other aircraft.

The aircraft is to have a combat radius between 350nm and 700nm unrefueled with a payload, as well as cruise speeds from 200kt to 300kt (370 km/h to 556 km/h) with full payload. The USMC said in the RFI that MUX’s range would complement the long range capabilities of Lockheed Martin’s F-35B and F-35C, Sikorsky CH-53K King Stallion, Bell Boeing V-22 Osprey and its Future Vertical Lift aircraft.



Image courtesy of Bell

The idea for MUX initially was broached by the USMC in August 2016. Thus far, Boeing, Lockheed, Northrop Grumman and Bell each have floated aircraft designs that could possibly be in contention for the MUX role. Lockheed Martin said it intended to submit information for the request. Questions about participating in the USMC’s request for information delivered via email and phone to the other aerospace manufacturers were not returned.

For its part, Boeing is developing a tail-sitting unmanned flying wing, the MUX-1; Lockheed Martin’s Skunk Works, partnered with Piasecki Aircraft, is develop a tilting duct fan unmanned aircraft, the ARES; Northrop Grumman is developing a tail-sitting flying wing, the Tern; and Bell is developing an unmanned tiltrotor aircraft, the V-247 Vigilant.

The USMC wants an early operational capability drone for land-based vertical takeoff and landing by 2025. It desires an initial operational capability drone for sea-based vertical takeoff and landing by 2028 and a full operational capability drone by 2034.
"We need to get closer to that Dane mentality" - Rear Admiral Bryant Fuller, NAVSEA Chief Engineer, March 2015 ASNE Day.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 29th, 2004, 7:40 am

March 25th, 2018, 8:26 am #174

BSmittyVA wrote:
MattReloaded wrote:
BSmittyVA wrote: I'm curious about the towing capabilities of Sea Hunter.  To move beyond its simplistic ONR mission, I think it'll need to have some form of LFAS VDS.  But the more I read about it, the more it seems like the same things that give it long endurance (slender hull with low installed power), might inhibit it's ability to tow a useful sensor at "task force" speeds (i.e. sprint-drift), especially in high seas.
Geospectrum's TRAPS is said to be suitable for USVs and the single tow with a Vertical Projector Array (VPA) doesn't seem likely to generate much drag.

According to the brochure, "TRAPS is ideal for littoral operations and very useful in deep water as part of a multistatic system". Typical detection range is said to be up to 1 CZ.
TRAPS might be the right solution, I don't know.
From Forecast International :

TRAPS trials that were conducted proved capability to tow the source at vessel speeds exceeding 18 knots, with the receive array proving excellent performance with minimal self-noise. 


"We are very pleased with results of TRAPS testing," said GTI president Paul Yeatman. "We are proud to offer users a high performance, lower cost and compact ASW sensor that represents an excellent and available sonar choice for a wide variety of surface combatant and patrol vessels as well as USVs, with a specific design available for Elbits' Seagull multi-mission USV. TRAPS can be used by navies for Anti-Submarine operations as well as coast guards for anti-Narco-Sub missions"
"We need to get closer to that Dane mentality" - Rear Admiral Bryant Fuller, NAVSEA Chief Engineer, March 2015 ASNE Day.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 29th, 2004, 7:40 am

March 28th, 2018, 5:30 pm #175

From Mönch Publishing :

SEAGULL ON THE HUNT
Published: 28 March 2018

A joint Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) exercise was recently held in the Mediterranean by the Israeli and the French Navies. Under Israeli Navy command, two Israeli ASW vessels, a French Navy frigate and ASW helicopter, alongside Elbit Systems' SEAGULL Unmanned Surface Vessel (USV) performed ASW missions against an Israeli submarine.

The joint force simultaneously operated manned and unmanned surface and airborne vessels, practicing advanced means and tactics for submarine detection and deterrence. 

In addition to ASW capabilities, SEAGULL features switchable, modular mission payload suites and can perform Mines Counter Measures (MCM) missions, Electronic Warfare (EW), Maritime Security (MS), Hydrography and other missions using the same vessel, mission control system and data links. It offers navies a true force multiplier delivering enhanced performance to naval operations, reducing risk to human life and dramatically cutting procurement and operating costs.

SEAGULL is a 12m USV developed for operation from either a mother ship or shore station. Designed for a mission endurance in excess of 96 hours, it marries a highly autonomous core command and control/situational awareness suite with modular payload packages tailored to specific missions including MCM, ASW, electronic warfare, and maritime security.

On14 September 2017, SEAGULL demonstrated a remotely operated ASW mission live. Via Satellite Communication (SATCOM), the USV, sailing in the Haifa Bay, Israel, performed the operational ASW mission using control consoles situated some 3,515km away in Elbit Systems booth at DSEI 2017 in London. Operating its Dipping Sonar and Elbit Systems proprietary software, SEAGULL performed real-time detections and classification of objects, demonstrating capability to deter and dissuade hostile subsurface activity. The Seagull team included two operators, a USV operator and sonar operator.
"We need to get closer to that Dane mentality" - Rear Admiral Bryant Fuller, NAVSEA Chief Engineer, March 2015 ASNE Day.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 29th, 2004, 7:40 am

April 13th, 2018, 8:28 am #176

Bell V247 @ SAS 2018 :

"We need to get closer to that Dane mentality" - Rear Admiral Bryant Fuller, NAVSEA Chief Engineer, March 2015 ASNE Day.
Quote
Like
Share